Problem

#1
Hi guys I need some advice,

I plan on joining the royal navy but have a problem. A few years ago I smoked cannabis and tired a number of class A drugs. Looking back I understand how foolish it was, at the time I was in a dark place. The drug use was recorded on my local police forces record as i tired to join the police but admitted my previous drug use. This was not classed as a conviction but is down on my record as intell. I am a different person now and this was years ago. Will it affect my chances of joining? Will the royal navy appreciate my honesty on this matter?Any advice would be appreciated
 

Blackrat

War Hero
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#2
MOD note;

As tempting as it is, sensible answers please.

BlueWhale. In relation to your other questions, try the search function first. You're posting all over the place and it's becoming annoying. You only need to ask once.

Posted from the Navy Net mobile app (Android / iOS)
 
#3
I read in the jsp 950 that you need to be three years clear of any cannabis use. I used cannabis for 1 year from the age 15-16, I'm 17 and I've been off for over a year now, I expect to be tmu'd but does anyone think I might get a permanent bar?

Posted from the Navy Net mobile app (Android / iOS)
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#5
I read in the jsp 950 that you need to be three years clear of any cannabis use. I used cannabis for 1 year from the age 15-16, I'm 17 and I've been off for over a year now, I expect to be tmu'd but does anyone think I might get a permanent bar?

Posted from the Navy Net mobile app (Android / iOS)
As you'll be aware, habitual recreational drugs use is a medical issue rather then just at odds with the service drugs policy. Medical issues aside, there's no point joining if the only reason for giving-up recreational drugs use is to seek employment in a job that insists on zero tolerance throughout your career - not just in order to join. The issue is attitude & long term intent, nothing less. The only way to genuine demonstrate this, is to remain drugs free for a significant period.

The drugs issue is no longer part of the selection interview, presumably because people say one thing to gain selection, but do another in reality - the only way to determine the reality, is to test - until someone comes up with a more accurate alternative.
 
#6
As you'll be aware, habitual recreational drugs use is a medical issue rather then just at odds with the service drugs policy. Medical issues aside, there's no point joining if the only reason for giving-up recreational drugs use is to seek employment in a job that insists on zero tolerance throughout your career - not just in order to join. The issue is attitude & long term intent, nothing less. The only way to genuine demonstrate this, is to remain drugs free for a significant period.

The drugs issue is no longer part of the selection interview, presumably because people say one thing to gain selection, but do another in reality - the only way to determine the reality, is to test - until someone comes up with a more accurate alternative.
Thank you ninja, I understand that, and honestly I hate drugs now, I quit for myself, so I can be a better person not some twat who does nothing with his life but smoke weed and hang around with idiots. How will I go about showing I'm free of cannabis? Should I get my GP to write a letter saying how long I have been free of cannabis for, I was thinking of trying to get a private doctor I saw to write a short letter but he will most likely charge me, and I am only 17 and my family live abroad now, so I don't have enough to pay for that. Do you think It could be a bar for me if I applied after one year clear of cannabis or do you think I will get deferred? Thank you for all the help.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#7
Unless you have a medical or criminal history which records drugs related incidents, you won't need to provide any evidence beyond a negative urine sample during initial training and at random junctures throughout your career. If you have a medical history that does record a drugs related medical condition, then unfortunately it's out of your hands.
 
#8
Unless you have a medical or criminal history which records drugs related incidents, you won't need to provide any evidence beyond a negative urine sample during initial training and at random junctures throughout your career. If you have a medical history that does record a drugs related medical condition, then unfortunately it's out of your hands.
I do have a medical record with some cannabis related history, I just got off the phone to the AFCO and they told me it will most likely be a deferral of a couple of years, which I would happy with, its a couple more years to train and to mature myself even more, but if its a permanent rejection then I will send off an application to the army and wish for the best, thank you!
 
#11
I do have a medical record with some cannabis related history, I just got off the phone to the AFCO and they told me it will most likely be a deferral of a couple of years, which I would happy with, its a couple more years to train and to mature myself even more, but if its a permanent rejection then I will send off an application to the army and wish for the best, thank you!
JSP = Joint Service Publication, ie the standards are joint. If you get Permanently Unsuitable for drug reasons from one, you can probably see where this is going....
 
#12
JSP = Joint Service Publication, ie the standards are joint. If you get Permanently Unsuitable for drug reasons from one, you can probably see where this is going....
Now I know what JSP stands for! Thank you, well I just hope It's not a permanent bar, hopefully the fact that I was a teenager in school hanging out with the wrong crowd, and I didn't use it for an extremely long time like 5-6 years I should just get deferred.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#14
To be fair, in this case, the guy was 15/16 and states there were other issues going on at the time. Short term experimental drugs use amongst people of this age is very common unfortunately. For those who manage to pick themselves up, move on, recognise the implications and genuinely seek to better themselves, it's not the services place to pass judgement and condemn them out of hand for the rest of their lives.
 
#15
To be fair, in this case, the guy was 15/16 and states there were other issues going on at the time. Short term experimental drugs use amongst people of this age is very common unfortunately. For those who manage to pick themselves up, move on, recognise the implications and genuinely seek to better themselves, it's not the services place to pass judgement and condemn them out of hand for the rest of their lives.
Thank you, I know drugs are bad, and am ashamed to have ever been a cannabis user to be honest. I would just be gutted if it ruined my chances at the military, especially the marines. After reading other threads on a different website, I may consider not going for the marines and going for the army, as I heard they can be more lenient when it comes to certain cases. I'm not sure how true that is I know the medical requirements are for all branches of the military, but I just read that the army can be more lenient and maybe consider the persons case more individually and take into consideration of my past, and my age and how long I did it for. What is your thought on this?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#16
The medical standards are the same but the Royal Navy, being the smallest of the UK Armed Forces, tends to be more "risk averse" on grounds of cost. In other words we have less flex with regard manpower and seek to reduce medical "wastage" by minimising those in the higher than average training risk groups. In other words, there's no harm in trying but equally, no guarantee the Army will apply a greater degree of latitude in this particular area.
 
#17
James

You could, if you wanted to, ring the main RN Careers Enquiries number, which is 08456 07 55 55 and get yourself a place on an Initial Careers Presentation and see how things go from there.
 
#18
To be fair, in this case, the guy was 15/16 and states there were other issues going on at the time. Short term experimental drugs use amongst people of this age is very common unfortunately. For those who manage to pick themselves up, move on, recognise the implications and genuinely seek to better themselves, it's not the services place to pass judgement and condemn them out of hand for the rest of their lives.
Hopefully my post (pic) wasn't construed as any sort of judgment of drug users, former or current. Quite the contrary, Seth Rogen, James Franco, Snoop Dog, Willie Nelson etc etc are doing very well in their careers, despite, or perhaps because of their consumption of massive quantities of Ganj.

Cant say that it would help one complete the Leopard crawl though.
 
#19
James

You could, if you wanted to, ring the main RN Careers Enquiries number, which is 08456 07 55 55 and get yourself a place on an Initial Careers Presentation and see how things go from there.

I have already been to an initial careers presentation, I sat and failed the psychometric test so I cannot re apply until July this year, I also have an application with the army that was deferred at the medical questionnaire stage until 2015 for other reasons. I may stick to the army as there is a greater chance of me getting in, and by the time I can re apply to the army a year would have gone by and it would probably look better on my record that I haven't had anymore issues for a couple of years. But I'm just not sure on how the doctor at the medical will know how I've been clear for three years? Because when I quit smoking weed I didn't book an appointment with my GP to tell him. I just quit and never went back. Should I go to my GP just to tell him how long I have quit for just so its on my record?
 
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