Preparing for the AIB - Tips?

slim said:
Good on you Credders, you have now joined the ranks of us dirty unwashed sh!t slingers, Welcome to the club. Many who dish it out can't take it, keep going for the jugular.
Your response to Calvin was brilliant!

When have I 'Dished' it out though?

In fact, I've had it dished out to me. Mockery for not understanding your Naval speak and jokes and Calvin's response was the final straw.

All I said was it must be scary being in front of a panel of Officers trying to prove you could be one of them. Can I ask what is wrong with that?
 

slim

War Hero
creddly said:
slim said:
Good on you Credders, you have now joined the ranks of us dirty unwashed sh!t slingers, Welcome to the club. Many who dish it out can't take it, keep going for the jugular.
Your response to Calvin was brilliant!

When have I 'Dished' it out though?

In fact, I've had it dished out to me. Mockery for not understanding your Naval speak and jokes and Calvin's response was the final straw.

All I said was it must be scary being in front of a panel of Officers trying to prove you could be one of them. Can I ask what is wrong with that?

Not a thing wrong there Credders. I think that you have proved to everyone on the site that you can take criticism both constructive & destructive. time though for you to respond more often in the manner of the Calvin response.
Best of luck with whichever branch you go for.
 
slim said:
creddly said:
slim said:
Good on you Credders, you have now joined the ranks of us dirty unwashed sh!t slingers, Welcome to the club. Many who dish it out can't take it, keep going for the jugular.
Your response to Calvin was brilliant!

When have I 'Dished' it out though?

In fact, I've had it dished out to me. Mockery for not understanding your Naval speak and jokes and Calvin's response was the final straw.

All I said was it must be scary being in front of a panel of Officers trying to prove you could be one of them. Can I ask what is wrong with that?

Not a thing wrong there Credders. I think that you have proved to everyone on the site that you can take criticism both constructive & destructive. time though for you to respond more often in the manner of the Calvin response.
Best of luck with whichever branch you go for.

Phwew - I thought for a second you were having a go! lol

Thanks for the praise Slim!

I actually don't yet know which branch to go for, the subs or the surface fleet!
 
Thanks for all of your help guys - excellent tips! It was interesting that I seemed to open a can of worms on my first post!!

If anyone else has any other useful tips please post them - the more the better. I’ll definitively brush up on the time/distance/speed stuff – sounds like it catches everyone out.
 

simonjgriffithshr

Lantern Swinger
This was written about six months after my AIB for another RR member so it may be a little patchy, but this is what I can remember:

"The first thing you do when you arrive is obviously take your stuff to your room (kind of like a cheap travel inn…). There is a welcome meeting with a SNCO and dinner. You’re kind of expected to go for a drink at the local pub (be warned, it’s about 200 metres away at most, but requires about a 1km walk to get there because of where the base entrance is!). They are right when they say that it is very useful to go for a drink with each other. Just chatting for a bit and feeling more comfortable with each other makes the Practical Leadership Tasks much easier (more on PLTs later).

The next day is the psychometric tests in the morning. Before you start one of the board presidents will give you a short pep talk type thing! The psychometric tests are for the most part very similar to IQ tests (so lots of practice with them is useful – I found that still being at school and doing maths was very helpful. I don’t think I would do as well now without being in practice so to speak). There is also a test where you have to search through something and find mistakes and mark them somehow (I can’t remember exactly how it worked, but that was the gist of it – I suppose quite important for loggies). The spatial orientation test can catch you out if you can’t visualise and concentrate. Questions would be along the lines of describing the positions of the ships in a fleet relative to the other ships (e.g. Ship B is 3km SW of ship A, ship A is 4km SW of ship C. Where is ship C in relation to ship B? Ship C is 7km NE of ship B – of course they will be better questions than that!) or, “A marine leaves a base, walks here, then there and then somewhere else, where is he in relation to the base?â€. There will be a service knowledge test (questions like: What is Harpoon? 1. A type 23 frigate. 2. An anti-ship missile. 3. A land attack missile). Finally you are given a selection of titles/questions from which you can choose to write an essay on (testing writing skills, ability to argue coherently etc. or even original thought – apparently my slant on why the Queen and the Royal family were necessary/relevant today was one they hadn’t heard before and they were intrigued).

After all the tests, you get lunch and run through a practice group discussion exercise (see info about group discussion later). You also get to go and have a look the PLT equipment and run through the necessary safety points and get a bit of practice. Then is the fun part… the fitness test – a bleep test. This is apparently to test courage rather than fitness – how far can you push yourself. They would probably look at someone with a fairly poor build that achieved a level 10 in a better light than an athletic person who only reached 11 because the person who reached 10 would have pushed himself much more. (Oh yes, then they run you back to the AIB building…) TIP: Whatever you do, avoid doing one thing. At my AIB one of the person, when the PTI asked if we wanted to get started after a basic warm-up asked for more of a warm up. Not popular!

The final day is fun (well, I found it fun anyway – but then I also enjoyed the bleep test…), but can be very nerve-wracking if you’re susceptible to nerves (I was fine until it was finished, then waiting for the result I was pacing, drinking water by the gallon, making very pointless comments – anything to stop thinking about what they were going to say). First up are the PLTs. I have to admit being very apprehensive about these before I arrived, but the run through the day before made everything settle. The night before, make sure you use the posters in your room with all the techniques so that you are aware of what you can/can’t do. When you arrive for your PLTs you will be given your task, then you’ll have to work out how to achieve it. I think they gave ten or fifteen minutes (although it felt more like five!) to work it out and draw diagrams etc. If you’re not sure what you have to do for the PLTs, you have to cross a gap (either over land or over a pool) using various pieces of equipment (planks of wood, ropes etc.), but as I say, this will become much clearer after the practice run. You will lead one of them, the other three in your group will also lead one each and then there will be a ‘team’ one where you have to work it out together. This is where they look for quite a bit of the leadership potential (as the name would, I suppose suggest). On other people’s tasks be supportive, do as they ask you to (team-work), but also point out potential problems with what they are suggesting. On your task be assertive, loud and clear (do you do any drama or are you used to public speaking?). Don’t forget to take on board any worthy suggestions from your team.

After the PLTs it’s back to the AIB building to (potentially dry off), change and get ready for the discussion. You’ll be given a booklet with lots of details in about a mission. You will probably have to rescue/find multiple groups, using certain equipment (with certain ranges, speeds, times of operation etc.) As a group you will then decide the best course of action. Between you let the board know what you intend to do. The Personnel Selection Officer (usually a female Lieutenant) will then ask lots of questions about your plan, picking any potential holes in it. There will be lots (and lots and lots) of speed/distance/time questions. Get practicing them – they will usually be using 3s and 2s (including 6s and 12s – and 60s for time). Questions may be similar to your vehicle travels at 30mph, how far can it travel in 20 minutes? 10 miles. After the PSO has shot your plan to pieces (or not as the case may be – we got lots of s/d/t questions, so our plan must have been okay) you will be sent out and told to come up with a personal plan – it can be the team plan (if you’re unimaginative, but I would suggest changing it at least slightly), an adapted version (most likely) or a completely new plan. You then get two minutes to present it to the board (it is nowhere near as long as it sounds, so be very succinct in your description). Finally, after all of that, you have the interview. There will be questions about you and your interests and activities. (You will fill in a form with details about such things before you attend, so elaborate on the things included on that). For example I talked about my involvement with rugby and the Duke of Edinburgh Award – they are likely to ask about any problems you have had to overcome during you life (perhaps relating to you hobbies or school etc.) and times when you have used/shown leadership skills. Then you will be asked about the service – give a couple of examples of where ships are currently serving (Falklands and Caribbean being safe bets, as well as the Gulf at present). You may be asked why they are there and what they are likely to be doing (Caribbean – drug interdiction). You’ll be asked to identify ships from pictures on the walls and what their role is. They will probably also ask how you recognised it (e.g. vertical launch Sea Wolf system on Type 23s). There will of course be the obligatory “How would you feel giving an order which may lead to the deaths of other people?†You will definitely be asked why you want to join the Royal Navy, only you can answer that of course (I don’t think the wanting to be like Bond answer would work for a woman though).

Then you wait. Become exceptionally nervous and start doing things you would never normally do (like read a magazine that doesn’t interest you in the slightest, or spend an inordinate amount of time studying a poster showing the badges of rank in all three services). Then, you find out – pass or fail? If you pass, you’ll be on cloud nine (I didn’t care that I got completely soaked walking down for the medical, or that I had a horrid train journey home. Of course, you still have the medical to go, and even if you passed, if you’re declared unfit you might feel equally awful…

Hope that’s helpful, if you want to know anything else feel free to ask."

That took an awfully long time to write, and I'm just thankful for copy and paste!
 

SUYAIB

Badgeman
TattooDog said:
SUYAIB said:
TattooDog said:
I take it you passed SUYAIB?

Yes I did!! Thanks! Hopefully I'll get selected some day soon

Congrats!! When does the selection signal come out? I think there's usually about 8 - 10 on there each year. I assume it depends on your AIB score.

Thanks!
September, for Warfare there's 2 places each year for the next 3 years. I believe there's at least 8 eligible for selection now so fingers crossed.

I think it's more on write ups for SUY although I believe AIB score may be a factor when chosing between 2 close candidates
 
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