Pre-Hospital Opportunities in Royal Navy

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by Navywannabe, Jun 2, 2016.

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  1. Firstly, apologies if this is posted in the wrong place.

    I am currently in the process of applying to the Royal Navy for the role of Medical Officer, and feel I have a rough idea of how things work etc.

    I was wondering if any current Medical Officers knew if there are any opportunities for getting involved in the Pre-Hospital/Emergency Care side of things at a later point in the career? Obviously all care given onboard a ship is technically pre-Hospital Care, but I was wondering if there were opportunities for Anaesthetists etc.

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Thank you, will certainly pop them a message, however they haven't logged in for a month, so expect are at sea!
     
  3. Only if the Press Gang got him.
     
  4. Or he got very lost.
     
  5. Because I have a weird and savant like ability to navigate DII, I've found the latest Recruitment Guide to Specialty Training, 2016.

    It lists PHEM (which I what I think you are referring to) as a specialty for ST3+, but at the moment the RN has 0 (zero) openings. I would note, however, many of my Medical Officer friends have not necessarily been limited by what the "book" says. However, against that, you will be trained for the needs of the RN first, and your preferences second. If they align, great, if they don't, tough. I know a MO who was awarded an MBE for their efforts on Op HERRICK, and then denied their choice of specialty training.

    In short, yes, you probably could do PHEM, but don't join the Armed Forces as your only option for it.
     
  6. Alfred, thank you very much!

    That is what I am referring to, it's shame there don't seem to be options for it right at the moment. However, fingers crossed that the service needs change over the next few years. Also, glad to hear that your colleagues have not been necessarily be limited.

    It does seem like there should still be opportunities, particularly onboard the larger ships and supporting any teams based on land (As a matter of interest, did the RN have much of a presence on land in Afghanistan etc? - Please excuse my ignorance).

    I was told that secondments are allowed still, so I would probably aim to go into Anaesthetics or Emergency Medicine for my Registrar training, strive for a secondment to Air Ambulance/HEMS somewhere, and then hope the Navy will want to keep me on in a PHEM role.
     
  7. Ive reached the limit of my knowledge so I can't offer much more.

    There is a presence in Afghanistan, however there is no MERT any more.

    Good luck in your endeavours.
     
  8. At times the RN personnel in Afghanistan outnumbered the Army! This includes ships on station, Fleet Air Arm pilots and the Airy Fairies that go with them, and of course the Loyal Machines.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Hello. I can answer this for you, and will be posting a detailed thread for MO applicants soon.

    You must remember that PHEM is a sub-speciality associated with anaesthetics/EM, and it adds a year to your training. It isn't possible to be a consultant in PHEM alone: you must dual-qualify with either EM or anaesthetics. The day job will be EM or anaesthetics, with PHEM taking up a few clinical sessions. Even the guys at London HEMS aren't exclusively PHEM doctors - they are EM or anaesthetic doctors first, who do PHEM on the side.

    After your 3 years as a general duties are up, you then specialise. Your speciality is decided with your careers manager, but the Service's needs come first - although a mutually beneficial agreement is normally sought. For EM and anaesthetics, you will be sent through the Acute Common Care Stem (ACCS) training pathway.

    The specialities that are mainly being recruited for at the moment are GP, EM and anaesthetics. There may be chances to undertake training in Psychiatry, acute medicine, surgery, radiology, opthalmology, etc. - but this cannot be guaranteed.

    The PONG specialities (paeds, obstetrics, neonatology and gynaecology) are not required by the service and thus unavailable. Most speciality care is now provided by RNR doctors, so cardiology/neurology/etc. are not routinely available.

    In short: you will be able do train as an anaesthetist in the Royal Navy, and will almost certainly be able to add PHEM to your repertoire!

    Best of luck.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Hang around long enough and someone half decent will always turn up!
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  11. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    True, true :)

    Medical recruiting is a specialist area due to the branch specific technicalities already highlighted on this thread.

    In the event the excellent pointers already posted on this thread leave the OP wanting to find out more, give the specialist recruiters a call: 02392 727096. They may even be able to offer an all expenses acquaint visit.

    May...
     
  12. expenses = stale biscuits and a curling at the edges sandwich, with a magical mystery tour of NCHQ...
     
  13. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    Luxury. I've only ever had tepid gravel ;)
     
  14. You were lucky.............I used to dream of tepid gravel...........
     
    • Like Like x 1
  15. Thank you very much for your detailed response and to everyone else who has previously posted.

    That's absolutely perfect and was exactly what I was hoping to be able to.

    The ACCS was what I would've wanted to do if I get rejected from the Navy and stay in the NHS so am glad to hear that it fits in well with what the Navy need and that there are opportunities.

    I know it obviously depends on what the RN is involved in at the time, but what kind of PHEM opportunities would there be? (In terms of day-to-day work). Is it a case of you work within a team as an Anaesthetist/EM Doc on board a larger ship (my understanding is that the smaller ships normally only have a GDMO, and sometimes just LMA), and that when a PHEM 'situation' arises, you go with the team that deals with it?

    This brings me onto another question I have: How does Medical Facilities vary from Ship to Ship? As part of the Portsmouth tour we visited HMS Richmond, where the sick-bay essentially seemed to me to have similar equipment levels as used in the back of an ambulance, with not much more diagnostic equipment. Is this pretty standard, or is there a lot of variance? I.e. What Medical facilities would I be working within if posted aboard a larger ship?

    I appreciate I am jumping the gun, so to speak, but the more info the better so I know what I'm getting myself in the for!

    When you post the thread to the MO applicants, please link me to it so I can read that too!

    Thanks again.
     
  16. Note - Just seen the thread you made, will read it now!
     
  17. "I know it obviously depends on what the RN is involved in at the time, but what kind of PHEM opportunities would there be? (In terms of day-to-day work). Is it a case of you work within a team as an Anaesthetist/EM Doc on board a larger ship (my understanding is that the smaller ships normally only have a GDMO, and sometimes just LMA), and that when a PHEM 'situation' arises, you go with the team that deals with it?"

    You receive your PHEM training, including Battlefield Advanced Trauma Life Support (BATLS), in the NEMO Course.

    As a GDMO, your PHEM exposure will be very limited in terms of attending road traffic accidents, cardiac arrests, stabbings etc. if that's what you mean?

    On a ship, your job is to provide primary care. Anything requiring more will require a helicopter and MEDEVAC: remember as a GDMO you're "only" working to the standard of an FY2 doctor. Even something like cellulitis or a severe infection would probably require MEDEVAC.

    If you want to do proper PHEM, that won't come until you are at least an ST4+ emergency medicine/anaesthetic trainee, which is the only time that you can do PHEM in the NHS.


    "This brings me onto another question I have: How does Medical Facilities vary from Ship to Ship? As part of the Portsmouth tour we visited HMS Richmond, where the sick-bay essentially seemed to me to have similar equipment levels as used in the back of an ambulance, with not much more diagnostic equipment. Is this pretty standard, or is there a lot of variance? I.e. What Medical facilities would I be working within if posted aboard a larger ship?"

    Naturally these capabilities are going to vary and even if I knew the answer in detail, I assume they should not be posted on a public forum. You have, however, probably already answered your own question with what you've written (!), and this indicates the standard of care you'll be providing when at sea. There is a reason the RN medicals are so thorough: they don't like or expect people to get too ill at sea!

    Now, the hospital ship RFA Argus is a whole different ball game. Have a Google and you'll see that it is essentially a floating hospital complete with operating theatre and ITU!
     
  18. Thanks for your response. What I meant is, after the ST4+, what would I be doing PHEM-wise in the RN? What kind of work/jobs/opportunities? Obviously I understand as a GDMO it will be very limited in terms of PHEM work.
     
  19. You'd be working full time in the NHS as a speciality registrar, and deployed to fulfil that role if there's a war going on which requires PHEM input.
     

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