powers that be.

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by ANDY_224, Aug 8, 2010.

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  1. Was wondering could anyone tell me who is it that ultimatley decides on letting someone in with an unspent conviction, after the careers advisor has put a waiver on the application. what factors come into play i.e. is it just down to what ever mood he's in that day? would the likes of a one off motoring offence be likley to be rejected? cheers for any feedback!
  2. Andy

    Remind me please.

    What was the offence?


  3. Captain Naval Recruiting (CNR) delegates the decision to the SO1 Recruiting (Usually a RN Commander) for your region.

    And no, it won't depend on the mood he is in.

    The decision will depend on the seriousness of the offence, your circumstances, the letter you provided and (probably most importantly) the Careers Advisor's assessment of your suitability for Naval service.

    Hope this helps, although I'm happy to be corrected by NS or SM.
  4. soleil, it was for no insurance or MOT £150 & £50 fines and 6 points it was about 3 years ago roughly.

    cheers for that advice tattoo dog - I'm confident in how i done with my fittness and psychometric tests and interview etc.
    I also served in the TA for 3 years do ya think that would help factor in my favour? the branch i'm applying for was in high demand but unfortunatley it's not now so i'm guessing that would be another factor?
  5. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    T-D has it spot-on.

    Again depends on the individual's circumstances & the Careers Advisers recommendation.

    As we have more than enough applicants without unspent convictions, we seldom apply for waivers - to give an idea, I've only felt two people worthy of the effort in the last 6 years, but generally if you're assessed as a good egg, snappy dresser etc., etc there's a reasonable chance of achieving a waiver. that said it isn't a right & individuals should not ask for them as a refusal often offends.

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