Powder Inhaler bar to entry?

Discussion in 'Health & Fitness' started by WelshWannabe, Jul 21, 2015.

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  1. Hello all, my first post, I am currently in the process of applying to the Royal Navy but have run into a bit of confusion, I am eight years clear of asthma (unsure definite date) however i was prescribed I believe two steroid inhalers to try and improve my airways (it didn't work, no inhaler did, it just gradually went away) is this a bar to entry? I have been reading JSP 950 and it states,
    4D.05 Candidates with a recorded history of asthma, with the following features, would be normally graded P8.
    a. Those who have experienced symptoms or taken, or been prescribed any form of treatment within the last 4 yrs.
    b. Those who have required more than one course of oral steroids3 .
    c. Those who have required more than one nebulisation since the age of 5.
    d. Those who have had a single admission to Intensive care or high dependency, or multiple admissions to hospital.
    None of these apply to me except part b. Does b mean oral steroids as in the tablet form or does it include steroid inhalers (i was told one of them was a steroid inhaler by my GP at the time) , if it helps I believe was called Bricanyl Turbohaler and the red one was called Symbicort Turbohaler.
    http://www.mims.com/resources/drugs/Malaysia/packshot/Bricanyl turbuhaler 0.5 mg_dose6002PPS0.JPG
    http://www.docsimon.com/article_images.php?action=sendtype&type=9&id=10689
    Any information from any medical guys or anyone would be appreciated!
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2015
  2. Go and speak to your recruiter as every medical issue will be looked at, and you may find they will want to write to your GP.
     
  3. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    Steroidal inhalers are a significant issue with regards suitability for service, regardless of elapsed time.

    Ultimately the medical examiner is the only person qualified to give definitive advice, once in possession of the full medical history.
     

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