Potential problems

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by MafiaManion, May 14, 2015.

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  1. Howdy.

    I'm a first year university student who's very interested in joining the RN. I'm going to try joining my URNU at their next application cycle and getting into shape in advance of trying to send my application in.

    I've got a couple of problems, though. Firstly, I have femoral retroversion; I know I'll be able to pass the fitness test regardless (although I'm probably not going to get the best score), but I'm not sure from the eligibility guidelines if it's a condition the RN allow. Secondly, I'm moderately dyspraxic. I'm not a complete clutz, but when it comes to fine motor skills (writing, for example), I'm pretty abysmal.

    Thirdly, and probably the most ominous one, is the diagnosis of autism (Aspergers) hanging over my head. I'm currently in talks with my GP and the mental health service at home to try to get the diagnosis rescinded - I don't believe it's justified now, and I believe it was a mistaken diagnosis when I was younger. I'm sure I can get the diagnosis overturned, but I believe it may be on my record and I'm unsure as to whether or not the RN will accept it.

    Is dyspraxia/femoral retroversion/soon-to-be-prior AS diagnosis will be enough to harm my application in of themselves?
     
  2. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    The medical standards for entry into the URNU are now more closely aligned to RN entry standards, so there may well be issues although definitive guidance can only be given by a qualified service healthcare professional once in possession of the full medical details.

    Firstly dyspraxia isn't an issue for the regular service so long as the individual can pass the entry test(s) without any concessions with regard time allowed/additional aids.

    ASD is in itself a bar to entry in accordance with the medical standards for entry unfortunately. Bone/joint disorders are also a significant issue and suitability may well depend on the severity, increased likelihood of injury/complications and any restrictions in relation to a person unaffected by this condition.
     

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