Potential Medical Bar to Entry?

Nezoat

Newbie
Hi everyone. I'm currently considering applying to join the navy, in fact I've been thinking about it quite hard for a while. I can definitely pass the fitness requirements and with a bit more practice I reckon I could score decently in the psychometric test. My one glaring issue is that I have Hyperhidrosis - basically, my hands, armpits and feet sometimes have bouts of sweating, while at other times are completely dry.

Now I applied to the army about two years ago and got knocked back for having this condition but the letter I got stated because I was getting treatment (iontophoresis) that couldn't be continued if I was training, that I am technically medically unfit for service. Now I don't use the treatment anymore, in fact the main reason I got it was purely because the condition is a slight social pain ("Oh nice to meet you" *extends hand* "You're hands are sweaty ew"). Not because the condition inhibits my ability to do anything.

I've checked the medical requirements on the RN website and it doesn't state anything about Hyperhidrosis, whereas the army site does. So I'm hoping that I can still be able to pursue military service through this avenue. Can anyone give me advice on the matter, despite the medical list not mentioning it, will it still be a bar to entry etc?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
The medical standards for entry are pretty much tri-service inasmuch as the Joint Service Publication (JSP950) will stipulate if the standard applies to one service, not another.

The rough rule of thumb is you must be fully free from any prescribed treatment and fully capable of doing your job without hindrance in any climate or environment.

The 'staff answer' is "each person is viewed on a case by case basis" but if the same conditions exist which preclude entry into the Army, then you can be fairly certain the outcome will be the same. If you can now join the Army, odds are you can join the Navy too in most cases.

Best of luck.
 

Nezoat

Newbie
The medical standards for entry are pretty much tri-service inasmuch as the Joint Service Publication (JSP950) will stipulate if the standard applies to one service, not another.

The rough rule of thumb is you must be fully free from any prescribed treatment and fully capable of doing your job without hindrance in any climate or environment.

The 'staff answer' is "each person is viewed on a case by case basis" but if the same conditions exist which preclude entry into the Army, then you can be fairly certain the outcome will be the same. If you can now join the Army, odds are you can join the Navy too in most cases.

Best of luck.

Thanks for the reply Ninja. The section I've highlighted is the sticking point because the reply I got for the medical failure before seemed to indicate it was the treatment for the condition as opposed to the condition itself that was the deciding factor in deeming me unfit for service. I hope I can work past this.

Thanks for the advice.
 

Lommy95

Newbie
Hi Nez,

I had an oppo who had joined with sweaty palms, remember very well during our technical training he'd try and spray his hands with antiperspirant during electrical practicals ha ha.
He managed to get in with the condition, and he also managed to get treatment for it while he was in so you I would say you'd be ok.

Regards,

Mitch
 

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
Hi Nez,

I had an oppo who had joined with sweaty palms, remember very well during our technical training he'd try and spray his hands with antiperspirant during electrical practicals ha ha.
He managed to get in with the condition, and he also managed to get treatment for it while he was in so you I would say you'd be ok.

Regards,

Mitch
Unless you're a Doctor in the recruiting system I'd be careful with the advice you're giving.
 
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