Pompey News: "HMS Ark Royal To Leave Portsmouth For Scrapyard"

AAF

War Hero
Cheers for the pic mate, one I saw was a french test and the whole front end had gone so must have been a full charge, this was some years ago and have tried to find pic since but no luck.
 
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Deleted 493

Guest
F53+target+3.jpg

Opposite image of another hit.

Sheffield's AM39 warhead did not detonate. Exocet carrries something of 350lb of hexolite in it's warhead (WE's please expand) and had it gone off, the death toll would have been larger. The damage and loss was down to collateral damage and the spread of fire, despite some superhuman efforts by the crew.

Levers
 

flymo

War Hero
View attachment 5614

Opposite image of another hit.

Sheffield's AM39 warhead did not detonate. Exocet carrries something of 350lb of hexolite in it's warhead (WE's please expand) and had it gone off, the death toll would have been larger. The damage and loss was down to collateral damage and the spread of fire, despite some superhuman efforts by the crew.

Levers

And loss of firemain hence why later T22s had a diesel pump aft on 2 deck
 
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Deleted 493

Guest
And loss of firemain hence why later T22s had a diesel pump aft on 2 deck

There were a whole load of lessons learned from Corporate. We have a our damaged and departed bretheren to thank for a whole load of policy change for the better since those triumphant, but tragic days. We went into that conflict blindfolded with assumed approaches based upon WWII theory. Disagree? Think back to the 'DAMAGE CONTROL SAVED ... ' posters prior to 1982. Sheffield, Coventry, Antelope, Ardent and the two Sir class landing craft gave us a whole load of thinking regarding system alignment and redundancy, clothing, damage control strategy and how we build, defend and equip warships and how we train sailors to fight the battle inside so they can fight the battle outside.

T42s (and other ships across classes) adopted this in a massive move o make sure we didn't come a cropper again. We have faced some harum-scarum moments since without even going to war - groundings, a 42 with it's fo'c'sle almost cut off, serious floods, massive gearbox explosion and fire and other shipbourne conflagurations and we have lost just a handful of staff. We have done well and learned thanks to other's misfortune. I shudder to think what shape the Navy would be in had it not been for Galtieri's gamble.

Levers
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Book Reviewer
Agreed, Levers. Given the amount of sea miles travelled by our vessels since '82 and the relatively few serious DC incidents, I think the RN's track record is pretty impressive, to be honest. Although we've come close to it on a couple of ships, we've never lost a ship in this way - thanks to the training conducted as a result of the lessons learned that you have mentioned.
 

flymo

War Hero
I read recently that pre WWI the third most dangerous job resulting in loss of life in the UK was being in the RN.

What does irk me somewhat is how lessons that were hard learnt in WWII must have been forgotten or conveniently side stepped to save costs.
 

AAF

War Hero
I read recently that pre WWI the third most dangerous job resulting in loss of life in the UK was being in the RN.

What does irk me somewhat is how lessons that were hard learnt in WWII must have been forgotten or conveniently side stepped to save costs.

The old DC school at Raleigh had pics of a Algerine class sweeper with most of the rear end blown off when she struck a mine in the Med, good DC saved her. HO stoker on that ship is now 89, I worked with him in Central Boiler House at U of York.
 
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