P8 Appeal!

Discussion in 'Royal Naval Reserve (RNR)' started by Pompey_Lad, Aug 30, 2010.

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  1. Hello - Can anyone offer any advice on the appeal system for RNR against P8 medical downgrade - I was all set to join RNR but I failed the medical due to a minor back problem - The SMO then downgraded me to P8 and I was rejected - I am still really keen to join and I do not think my minor back problem will interfere with training, etc - I have been told that I can appeal and wondered if anyone could let me know if I stand a chance and the best way to go about it, etc . . . :(
  2. You haven't been demoted as P8 isn't a rank. Your application to join the RNR has been rejected on medical grounds.
  3. Do the RNR still use P(number) while everyone else uses A(No)L(No)M(No)E(No)?
  4. Okay - I didn't mean ' demoted ' in that sense - I suppose a better word would be ' downgraded ' when talking about medical matters - I am not that familiar with military terms - Anyway, can you offer any advice on the appeal system and, if so, what sort of thing would give me a better chance of overturning the decision?
  5. Chronic (ie long term) back issues are a bar to entry. It is impossible to assess this by text - you need to be examined. An SMO has done this and given his professional opinion. Your medical knowledge may be greater than his, and if you believe this to be the case then ask at your Unit regarding the appeals process.

    As has been said hundreds of times on RR, you cannot appeal our standard as that is absolute. You can appeal whether you have the condition or not.
  6. Okay - Thanks for the advice - I haven't got a ' chronic ' back issue as such and it was SD who failed me at the medical - SD passed my medical notes to SMO for second opinion - SD said that because I was joining RNR it should be alright and I would probably get in okay - I was really disappointed to be rejected on, what I believe, were not really valid reasons to bar entry - I think that it might be my age ( got application form in at the cut-off point ) and perhaps because I have never done any military service before - However, I am going to appeal and try my best to get the decision I really want - Do you think that there is anything extra I could do to improve my chances of success?
  7. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    To be honest, the standards for entry for the RNR are exactly the same as RN Warfare Specialist in regular service. If you cannot be passed fit for one, you can't be passed fit for the other as RNR ratings can be operationally deployed.

    The only exception to reservists having slightly less stringent medical standards are those in the for the URNU organisation, for some peculiar reason.

    As angrydoc states, you need professional medical evidence to prove you don't suffer from a condition that bars entry in order to lodge an appeal or professional medical evidence which disputes the extent to which a condition affects an individual - but ONLY if the condition itself, in any manifestation is not an outright bar.

    Disputing the medical condition because a person may think it's 'not fair', whilst the disappointment is fully appreciated, is a waste of time.
  8. You stated earlier that you got you application in before the cut off age. However, the cut off ages for joining are that, you must have joined by the cut off age of 40 for the RNR.

    Also has as been said there are standards that you must meet for military service, whether Full time or reserves. If you do not met those standards then the MOD is quite within it's rights to turn you down. You can only really appeal if you think the medial staff have based there decision on incorrect information.

    Best of luck


  9. Cheers for the honest comments - I will seek professional medical advice and take it from there - If I had kept my mouth shut at the medical I would have passed no problem - I thought I should be honest and told SD that my minor back problem ( which is more of a muscle strain ) had troubled me in recent times - Oh well, I'll give the appeal system a go and see what happens - Afterall, where there's a will . . . . .
  10. I will look into the other options if the appeal doesn't go my way - My CA said I could have an age extension if I go for the appeal so I should be okay if I get a result - I'm a bit gutted about it all as this will be my last chance to do a bit of service and, I am fairly certain, I could complete the training, etc . . .
  11. Chronic is a word people do not understand. It means long-term, and has nothing to do with severity. Acute means short term, hence an acute issue is something which happens suddenly (eg a fracture) but a chronic issue goes on longer (eg arthritis). You mentioned your pain has bothered you in recent times. This doesn't sound acute. Back issues are a major reason for medical downgrades and if you have propensity to them before you join then you are much more likely to have issues during service. That is why you have been rejected. How bad it is at present is irrelevant.
  12. I see what you mean and I understand why RN rejected me - Like I said it is more of a muscle strain than a back problem and it only happens when I lift a heavy object incorrectly or do some exercise without warming up, etc - I think I did it about twenty years ago when I did a lot of heavy lifting in a job I had when I was younger - Since that time I have done loads of competitive sport ( kick-boxing/boxing/weights, etc ) as well as physically demanding jobs - It has never really been a problem as such but I can see things from RN's point of view - All I can do is try I suppose?
  13. Approximately 10 years ago my application to join the RN was rejected because i admitted to previously suffering from siatica due to a slipped disc. My back had been operated on a few years earlier and i had had no reoccurance of the problem since (or even to this day - touch wood!!) but the medical entry standards decreed that anyone who had ever suffered from siatica at any time would not be eligable to joi the RN. I appealed against the decision and was sent by the RN to London to see a specialist who after a pretty simple examination and a scan passed me fit for service. Because it took a few months for this process to be completed things in my personal circumstances had changed and i'd heard about the RNR. I ended up joining the RNR and have just completed a six month deployment.

    I doubt very much that the RN would spend all that time and money for someone just wanting to join the RNR (although i may well be wrong), and things may have changed over the years. I was looking to join the RN in a branch that was very low on numbers at the time so i may have looked like value for money.

    Hope this helps.
  14. Thanks for the advice - Yeah, I do find that helpful as it shows that an appeal can sometimes be successful - I am going to seek medical advice by myself and take it from there - I am not expecting RN to waste any money on me and, if I can show that my back will not be a problem, I reckon RN might give me an opportunity to prove it - Cheers - PL.
  15. I admire your attitude, but no number of civilian medical opinions will alter the rules of the JSP.
  16. Cheers for your comments AD - I always try to maintain a PMA although I am also a realist and, deep down inside, I know that my chances of gaining entry are slim - However, I will not give up until it's all over and, no matter what the outcome, I appreciate all the comments from yourself and others - PL.
  17. At the tender age of 16 years I applied to join the RN. However I failed the medical due to one of my legs being longer than the other (3/4 inch difference). It was explained to me that this difference in leg length
    would lead to chronic back pain. Thus I was graded P8 and sent on my way back home.

    I was still keen on joining the RN, so I got an Orthopedic referral and had the difference in the leg length corrected surgically (on the longer leg) and three years later re-applied and passed the medical.

    The Examining Doctor (who examined me years previously) remarked that this was the first case of a P8 being upgraded to P2 that he had experienced!

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