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Origins of the term "crossing the bar"?!

Yeah, I know.
Just making the point that I reckon the draught does travel OK, contrary to Stirlin's experience. Maybe it depends how it's kept on arrival...
Must be me :( , will stick with this in future.
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When Coor's bought Sharpe's, Doom Bar beer crossed the bar shortly after. As Ballistic mentioned, it became cloyingly sweet; to much for my Northern peasant tastes.
I had to have a few in the pub last night, just for research purposes you understand, and you're right. The 5th pint was definitely sweeter than the first one :)
 
I had to have a few in the pub last night, just for research purposes you understand, and you're right. The 5th pint was definitely sweeter than the first one :)

Apply for a grant to do further research , of course you will need some staff to accompany you to the pub .
I am retired BTW so plenty of free time. :)
 
Apply for a grant to do further research , of course you will need some staff to accompany you to the pub .
I am retired BTW so plenty of free time. :)
Sold to the man in the hat, there's bound to be some Government Dept gullible enough to sponsor a five year research programme!
 
Sold to the man in the hat, there's bound to be some Government Dept gullible enough to sponsor a five year research programme!
Gen dit , when I was working at U of Y we found some research papers floating around in our car park opposite a research dept , 2 year study as to why working class men bet on horse racing !.
 
On a l
I thought "crossing the bar" was a Liverpool expression, a reference to the Mersey Bar, and it just meant 'coming home'
The earlier answers are of course correct but, on a lighter note, I recall crossing the Mersey Bar outward bound the morning after a great party alongside, when a steward appeared on the bridge carrying what turned out to be the ceremonial mayoral chain of one of the local mayors which he had, ahem, found in the Marine Engineer Officer's bunk....:eek:

It was quietly returned ashore, discreetly wrapped, by the disembarking pilot and, before I forget, I should perhaps mention that the said mayor was of the female persuasion.:)

Jack
 
On a l

The earlier answers are of course correct but, on a lighter note, I recall crossing the Mersey Bar outward bound the morning after a great party alongside, when a steward appeared on the bridge carrying what turned out to be the ceremonial mayoral chain of one of the local mayors which he had, ahem, found in the Marine Engineer Officer's bunk....:eek:

It was quietly returned ashore, discreetly wrapped, by the disembarking pilot and, before I forget, I should perhaps mention that the said mayor was of the female persuasion.:)

Jack

On a l

The earlier answers are of course correct but, on a lighter note, I recall crossing the Mersey Bar outward bound the morning after a great party alongside, when a steward appeared on the bridge carrying what turned out to be the ceremonial mayoral chain of one of the local mayors which he had, ahem, found in the Marine Engineer Officer's bunk....:eek:

It was quietly returned ashore, discreetly wrapped, by the disembarking pilot and, before I forget, I should perhaps mention that the said mayor was of the female persuasion.:)

Jack
The song Ellan Vannin makes reference to the Bar lightship.
 
This might help:

The Devon home where Tennyson wrote his last poem

...Back in 1889, Alfred Lord Tennyson stayed with the historian James Froude at his magnificent house overlooking the Salcombe estuary. And it was here, in a summerhouse with a serene sea view, that he is said to have written his final poem “Crossing the Bar”, in which he foresees his imminent death. The “bar” in question is the Salcombe sandbank, which at low tide becomes partially exposed and a danger to shipping. (Thirteen lifeboatmen drowned there in 1916.)...
 
A variation to the term, 'crossed or crossing the bar'.

In Helicopter Search and Rescue, a piece of equipment we use is the Sproule Net. Consisting of a net, spread apart by a lower hinged bar and an upper bar to spread the net. It is dragged through the water below a helicopter suspended from the winch to capture 'unsavoury' items. (That'll be 'stiffs' in plain parlance).

Sproule Net.jpg

When the object is in the net the term, "Over the bar and in the net" is called from the winch operator to the rest of the crew.

Usually, if you do have a corpse and it's been in the ogin a while, it is left outside the helicopter cabin!! (They don't half pong!!!!)

Lesson ends!!
 

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