Ordeal By Exocet

#1
Ian Inskip, the navigator on Glamorgan gives a very detailed account of war in the south atlantic , RAS's in pitch darkness and heavy sea, numerous NGS runs and surviving the Exocet hit.
As with Red Sailor, the first one to send a PM with address will get the book p&p paid and then that person does similar once read to next on list.

Stirl
 
#9
stirling said:
Ian Inskip, the navigator on Glamorgan gives a very detailed account of war in the south atlantic , RAS's in pitch darkness and heavy sea, numerous NGS runs and surviving the Exocet hit.
As with Red Sailor, the first one to send a PM with address will get the book p&p paid and then that person does similar once read to next on list.

Stirl
A mate of mine Mick Adcock was the PO Greenie on the ships flight RIP, great PH on our many runs ashore at Lossie when he was an EMA air :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
 
#10
scouse said:
stirling said:
Ian Inskip, the navigator on Glamorgan gives a very detailed account of war in the south atlantic , RAS's in pitch darkness and heavy sea, numerous NGS runs and surviving the Exocet hit.
As with Red Sailor, the first one to send a PM with address will get the book p&p paid and then that person does similar once read to next on list.

Stirl
A mate of mine Mick Adcock was the PO Greenie on the ships flight RIP, great PH on our many runs ashore at Lossie when he was an EMA air :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
Colin Vickers the crewie was also lost on the Glamorgan Scouse. I knew Mick from 737 at Portland, although not that well.
 
#12
I knew Mark Henderson and Brian Hinge from Osprey which was made sadder as the Glamorgan was one of the three musketeers Arrow,Alacrity and glamorgan having not read the book i can imagine its likely to be a fascinating read
 
#13
HMS Glamorgan POAEM(L) MJ Adcock CK B Easton AEM(M) M Henderson AEM(R) B P Hinge LACEMN D Lee AE(M)2 K I McCallum AB(R) McCann CK BJ Malcolm MEM(M)2 TW Perkins L/CK M Shambles L/CK AE Sillence STD J D Stroud L/T DHR Tinker POACMN CP Vickers RIP
 
#14
scouse said:
stirling said:
Ian Inskip, the navigator on Glamorgan gives a very detailed account of war in the south atlantic , RAS's in pitch darkness and heavy sea, numerous NGS runs and surviving the Exocet hit.
As with Red Sailor, the first one to send a PM with address will get the book p&p paid and then that person does similar once read to next on list.

Stirl
A mate of mine Mick Adcock was the PO Greenie on the ships flight RIP, great PH on our many runs ashore at Lossie when he was an EMA air :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
Similarly Colin Vickers POACMN. small world Scouse
 
#15
trelawney126 said:
scouse said:
stirling said:
Ian Inskip, the navigator on Glamorgan gives a very detailed account of war in the south atlantic , RAS's in pitch darkness and heavy sea, numerous NGS runs and surviving the Exocet hit.
As with Red Sailor, the first one to send a PM with address will get the book p&p paid and then that person does similar once read to next on list.

Stirl
A mate of mine Mick Adcock was the PO Greenie on the ships flight RIP, great PH on our many runs ashore at Lossie when he was an EMA air :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry: :cry:
Similarly Colin Vickers POACMN. small world Scouse
But I already said that!!! :wink:

Colin had a trophy dedicated to him at Culdrose because of his professionalism. The top student at AFT, (Advanced Flying Training), (Pinging), was awarded said trophy.

A real nice guy and a I feel privileged to have known him.
 
#19
Have this in one in my book. The Falklands War. Glamorgan was on the gunline 18 miles from shore and at alert when she was hit. But neither the Type 992Q target indicator or the Type 965M. Surveillance radars detected the incoming Exocet. These old radars where unable to see such a low flying,fast moving,small target against the back ground clutter. The first warning of the approach of the missile came when the OOW on the bridge made a visual sighting. With great presence of mind he turned the ship away from the missile, so that it would be presented with the smallest possible target area, the ships stern. Turning the ship so that the stern is facing the incoming threat was a tatic first developed to combat the torpedo, it was used as long ago as 1916 in the battle of Jutland. Glamorgan was 520 ft long but only 54 ft wide. Their was no time to deploy the chaff decoys. There was only ten seconds between detection and impact. But it wasnt just the good handling that saved here. She had a piece of luck, the surfaced launched MM38 FAILED TO DETONATE ON IMPACT. Had the warhead had detonated it would have probably meant the loss of the ship
 
#20
I have it and it will be posted onward tomorrow.....been unable to get out recently. No need to 'Pull your wool out' just yet
 

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