Operational Honours and Awards List: 19 March 2010

#2
Well done to all concerned (and to all those who are on active service anywhere and in any capacity for their commitment, dedication and professionalism)

Honours and Awards are not given out for the fun of it and each and every one will have been hard earned and justly deserved.
 
#4
alfred_the_great said:
What did the 3 lads do to get QCBs? Good effort on all on this list!
Was wondering that myself, hopefully the RN PR machine might splutter into gear for long enough to feature their achievements.

Well done of course to everyone honoured, that is really quite some list in just a six month period.
 
#7
IIRC he shouldn't have even been with the USMC - he was on an exchange posting, and should've been recalled when TELIC 1 kicked off. However, someone forgot about him, and he cracked on. CGC and MC ain't bad for an LC!!
 
#8
Purple_twiglet said:
What about the RM Warrant Officer with the CGC, who then won the MC this time round?

NAILS!
Royal Marine awarded Military Cross for Afghanistan bravery



A Royal Marine who saved lives under fire has been awarded the Military Cross, one of the highest awards for gallantry for his actions during combat operations in Afghanistan.

Warrant Officer 1 Matthew Tomlinson has been recognised for his bravery while under heavy concentrated fire by the Taleban while patrolling in an five-strong armoured Viking vehicle convoy near Bashran, Helmand Province, during Operation Herrick in May last year.

Matthew, 43, of Street, Somerset, was patrolling with the Armoured Support Group, part of 3 Commando Brigade, when the lead Viking was partly blown up by a mine (an improvised explosive device).

The convoy halted and then came under sustained heavy rocket propelled grenade fire from one side from the hidden enemy.

Oblivious to his safety, Matthew left his Viking and ran 50 metres to the stricken vehicle which was on fire and helped rescue the troops in the back. Not only did the troops have to avoid the fire and the possibility of the 4,000 rounds of ammunition exploding on the damaged Viking, but they had to dodge the enemy fire while aware of the ever present danger of a second mine.

Amid this intense battle Matthew also directed return fire on to the Taleban and attended to the seriously injured driver of the damaged Viking with the help of soldiers of the Queen’s Royal Hussars the Vikings were escorting. While the cab fire was spreading and ammunition was exploding they continued to administer medical care to the driver utilising the cover of the Viking.

Matthew then further risked his life by searching for a Royal Marine who had been manning the gun turret on top of the damaged Viking. He found the turret had been blown some distance away with the Marine still inside, but already dead.

Running back to the Viking, he again directed return fire from supporting Welsh Guards onto the enemy. Then with help, he recovered both the driver and the turret gunner on stretchers to relative safety. The patrol then withdrew and the casualties were flown out. In the meantime the enemy fire had been suppressed.

Matthew said:

“I am very proud and feel highly honoured to be recognised with the Military Cross. However, I must say that these were tragic circumstances. Also I could not have acted with the confidence I did without the assurance that I had a top team behind me. I know that if my Viking had been hit, then I know the lads would have acted in exactly the same way."

“They were effectively a band of brothers because they worked so well together. I was in charge of their welfare, morale and fighting effectiveness for seven months and I am still very proud to have served with them. The ranks of the Armoured Support Group are the real heroes."


The Viking units, whose primary role is protected mobility, act as independent patrols in their own right or escort other forces on patrol and deliver stores such as equipment, ammunition and water. They also carry out emergency medical evacuation of casualties.

Matthew now serves with 1 Assault Group Royal Marines in HM Naval Base, Devonport, Plymouth, as a landing craft advisor to 300 Marines. He has already served in Afghanistan and Iraq and been awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross for the latter. He has also served in N Ireland, Sierra Leone, Congo, Hong Kong, USA, Zaire and French Guyana.

Matthew, who joined the Marines in 1989 is married to Sharon, has three children - daughter Ellis, 13, Harvey, six, and Daniel, four. His mother Wendy lives in Street, Somerset and father Richard lives in Yeovil, Somerset. He will receive his award at a later date.
 
#10
From This is Plymouth:

This is Plymouth 20 Mar 2010 said:
TWO Plymouth-based servicemen are to receive two of the nation's top honours for their bravery and life-saving skills. Royal Marine Warrant Officer 1 Matthew Tomlinson has been awarded the Military Cross after saving lives while under Taliban fire in Afghanistan. Royal Navy sailor Petty Officer Richard Hicks has also been awarded the Queen's Commendation for Bravery after potentially saving lives in a fire on a landing craft. They are two of 150 servicemen and women to receive awards in the latest Operational Honours List announced by the Ministry of Defence yesterday. Both servicemen said they are "very proud" and "honoured" to be recognised for their achievements.

WO1 Tomlinson was patrolling with the Armoured Support Group – part of Stonehouse-based 3 Commando Brigade – in May last year when the convoy came under intense Taliban fire. The lead Viking vehicle was partly blown up by an enemy mine and Taliban fighters then proceeded to fire rocket propelled grenades at the convoy. The 43-year-old ran 50 metres to the stricken vehicle, which was on fire, to help rescue troops in the back. He returned fire and also attended to the seriously injured driver of the damaged vehicle. WO1 Tomlinson said: "I am very proud and feel highly honoured to be recognised with the Military Cross.

"However, I must say that these were tragic circumstances. Also I could not have acted with the confidence I did without the assurance that I had a top team behind me.

"I know that if my Viking had been hit the lads would have acted in exactly the same way."

The married father of three now serves with 1 Assault Group Royal Marines based at Devonport Naval Base as a landing craft adviser to 300 marines. He has already served in Afghanistan and Iraq and been awarded the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross for the latter.

PO Hicks was in charge of a landing craft when a fire broke out while it was being worked on by civilian contractors at Devonport Naval Base last August. He ordered the staff out to safety, and decided to search the landing craft in case any staff remained. He attempted to put out the fire single-handedly using two fire extinguishers before firefighters arrived. The 36-year-old, who is now in charge of the landing craft control centre in the naval base's basin, said: "I am very proud to have this award.

"To be honest I did not know where the fire was when I went in there; I could have landed on top of it. Luckily it all worked out."

The fire was non-suspicious, caused by a heater. No one was hurt. The married father-of-one's role in the naval base is to provide support to landing craft undergoing repairs and trials on behalf of 1 Assault Group Royal Marines.

Both servicemen will receive their honours at a royal ceremony later this year.
 
#12
Bravery honour for Navy hero
Pompey News 23 Mar 2010 said:
A navy engineer swept overboard by a massive wave has received a top honour for saving a colleague from drowning. Petty Officer Alan Murphy has been awarded the Queen's Commendation for Bravery for keeping his unconscious comrade alive in freezing and stormy seas. The 27-year-old was on board the Type 23 frigate HMS Somerset when he was swept off the helicopter flight deck by the 40ft wave...
Also, Cdr Henry Merewether RN, who was awarded the QCVS, was the Cdr First MCM Squadron (MCM1) and deployed as the MW Battle Staff Cdr for the Op TELIC MMs for much of 2009.
 
#14
alfred_the_great said:
So, just the killick to go then!
Got him! I've just obtained confirmation that the killick awarded the QCB was indeed LS(D) Carl Thomas:

ICE PATROL

National Geographic Channel website said:
CARL THOMAS

Tommo joined the Royal Navy ten years ago as an operator mechanic in submarines loading torpedoes. After witnessing the diving section in Scotland he decided that he wanted to do something more exciting! He took a branch change and trained to be a diver for six months when he took his seamanship and diving examinations. Although the training is very tough with an 80% failure rate due to course injuries and ear problems, Tommo came top of his leading dive course and has been diving for six to seven years.

Tommo joined HMS ENDURANCE on July 2008 and spent two years on board. His role means he is responsible for the planning and supervision of all dives. This includes the Ship’s hull searches, underwater engineering, seabed searches, maintaining all the kit, assisting surveyors in planting, and retrieving equipment.

For the dive team to go out it must consist of five people, out of these five people there has to be a leading diver plus two divers. A diving kit includes six sets of communication and two dive boats. The dive unit must always be prepared because there are never any planned diving operations. For instance if the ship gets damaged in the ice divers must go in to assess and fix the problem.

Tommo said that his job on HMS ENDURANCE is possible the best job on a Royal Navy ship for a diver because he is involved in the ship’s Ice Patrol activities. Normally on another ship or shore ship he would be fetching and blowing up mines and conducting underwater demolitions. His main concerns are rescuing stricken divers and big things in the water like leopard seals and killer whales.
For the background to his award, read Para 37 of the HMS Endurance Flood BOI report.
 
#15
Yet to appear on its website but the Pompey News published this article in yesterday's edition:

Portsmouth News 5 Apr 2010 said:
Award for officer who planned safe return of troops from warzone
by MATT JACKSON
Defence correspondent
[email protected]

James Dean wins OBE for overseeing return of men and women from Iraq

His namesake was a rebel without a cause, but this James Dean has been honoured for his devotion to duty. The 38-year-old naval commander from Southsea has been awarded the OBE for getting troops safely out of Iraq. Between March and July last year he was a lead planner responsible for removing 5,000 troops from the war-torn country. His work involved travelling in convoys that were targeted by rockets and roadside bombs, to solve problems in Basra, Baghdad and Umm Qasr. He said: `It was a real team effort so I was staggered but at the same time extremely honoured to have been recognised with this award. `The successful drawdown of UK forces in Iraq in 2008 and 2009 marked the culmination of extensive planning across defence.'

Working at the Joint Force Logistic Component Headquarters, the dad-of-two put his energy into getting troops out, but also setting trip arrangements for maritime training. He said: `I made several visits to Umm Qasr to meet with the UK forces responsible for training the Iraqi Navy. `It is an activity that endured following the transition to a bilateral partnership with the government of Iraq.' The navy carries out regular patrols of two giant oil platforms off the coast of Iraq, which are responsible for 90 per cent of that country's gross domestic product.

Cdr Dean began his military career in 1991 and has served in HMS Jersey, London, Marlborough and Grafton. He has gone through deployments to the Baltic, North America, the Caribbean, the Mediterranean and the Middle East. Back from Iraq, he now works at the navy's command headquarters on Whale Island. He is responsible for maritime planning for operations, deployments and exercises involving the fleet in a joint or multi-national environment. Cdr Dean is married to Sherria and they have two sons Harry, eight, and Jack, seven, and live in Southsea, Portsmouth...

 
#16
alfred_the_great said:
IIRC he shouldn't have even been with the USMC - he was on an exchange posting, and should've been recalled when TELIC 1 kicked off. However, someone forgot about him, and he cracked on. CGC and MC ain't bad for an LC!!

Just curious, why should he have been recalled? As I understand exchange postings, if there is a chance of operational service, then the host nation must check with the sending nation before deploying the individual. Since Britain participated in TELIC, then there should have been no objection to WO1 Tomlinson deploying with the USMC. If Britain had elected not to participate in Iraq, then I could see why he would have been recalled or at least left behind when his unit deployed.

I believe there have been other individuals (both ways) who have deployed operationally, when both nations agreed.
 

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