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One for Pontius

Also was the airborne dunking sonar any better than the thing we had on our arse end which the Tanky a UC2 who operated the thing reckoned was borderline useless unless you were in the Med.
While we are at it what did the dunking shite bring to the table that an air dropped sonar buoy couldn’t.
 
I would be very surprised if it didn’t, can’t see the yanks being too happy about it not having one either either. Myself having been subject to too many ASW exercises , disrupting my sleep listening to the yanks bloody awful sonar, I reckon the first option from them would’ve been lob a nuke depth charge at it. Obviously it was a kiss yer arse goodbye scenario I never imagined that once some lunatic fired the first one there was ever any going back.
 
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I would be very surprised if it didn’t, can’t see the yanks being too happy about it not having one either either. Myself having been subject to too many ASW exercises , disrupting my sleep listening to the yanks bloody awful sonar, I reckon the first option from them would’ve been lob a nuke depth charge at it. Obviously it was a kiss yer arse goodbye scenario I never imagined that once some lunatic fired the first one there was ever any going back.

Ah, there we go.

We should both have checked Wikipedia before speculating :)

British variant differences[edit]​

Test missile on display at Bristol Aero Collection, Kemble, England
A variant fitted to the British Royal Navy's Leander-class frigates differed in several respects from the original Australian version designed to operate in the Pacific. The Royal Navy required changes to the frequencies used in order to enable Ikara to be used in the NATO area, where different electronic warfare conditions and international frequency agreements had to be taken into account. Neither the Australian-built analogue computer system, nor the American Bunker Ramo Corporation 133 digital computer system, used in most RAN systems, were compatible with the ADA digital battle-control computers being fitted into Royal Navy ships, and this was also changed. The UK-manufactured version of the Mark 44 torpedo also differed from the US-built version purchased by the Australians for their Ikara missiles. The British also required the missile payload to be changeable aboard ship to permit different payload combinations to be used, including a nuclear depth bomb (NDB) option, and this, together with the different internal ship layouts required further changes to the missile, storage and handling arrangements. The Australian practice was to combine the missile and payload at a shore-based ordnance facility and issuing the complete unit to a ship; repair or maintenance was only possible ashore. In the British ships, the changes made enabled a faulty torpedo on a missile in working order to be replaced, increasing the flexibility of use of very limited stocks aboard; especially on lengthy deployments around the globe, as was more common with British ships than their Australian counterparts. The facility to change a torpedo payload aboard ship also permitted a change from a conventional torpedo to a WE.177A NDB, a facility for a nuclear option that was not needed on ships fitted with the Australian variant of Ikara.[5] The British launcher also differed, covered by a zareba (breakwater) when not in use to prevent icing in northern waters, and extremely accurate in training in bearing. It was also notoriously noisy.[citation needed]

Specifications
Mass513 kilograms (1,131 lb)
Length3.429 metres (135.0 in)
Wingspan1.524 metres (60.0 in)
WarheadMark 44 (two versions)
Mark 46
NDB (Nuclear Depth Bomb).
Detonation
mechanism
none


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ikara_(missile)
 
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Also read that, further on it says that Ikara could not carry mk46 or stingray because of their weight.
If that is true then a NDB must be a definite no go.
Right / wrong?

Can't remember from my time on Dido - you?
 
Found this of the one and only time when ASROC was tested with a nuke, the ship is the Agerholm, the launcher can be seen just aft of the first funnel.
Apparently the explosion was judged to have been the same size as the one that destroyed Hiroshima, must‘ve left some ringing in the ears.
Presumably the RN’s nuclear depth charge/bomb would’ve produced similar results.IMG_3913.jpeg
 
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Also read that, further on it says that Ikara could not carry mk46 or stingray because of their weight.
If that is true then a NDB must be a definite no go.
Right / wrong?

Can't remember from my time on Dido - you?
Never even thought about it regarding Ikara.
We didn't carry the NDB while I was on there but I think we were fitted for it.
Definitely not in the Ikara mag though - I was more worried about Otto fuel down there.
 
Never even thought about it regarding Ikara.
We didn't carry the NDB while I was on there but I think we were fitted for it.
Definitely not in the Ikara mag though - I was more worried about Otto fuel down there.
Which goes against the wiki article. Mk44 was not Otto fuel, Mk46 was.
But agree, Otto fuel was definitely mentioned as being in the Ikara mag

Edited to add.
Mag deck was painted white - used to show Otto fuel leaks from Mk46
 
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