NTVleaflet.pdf

artthefart

Midshipman
NTVleaflet.pdf
The MOD has at long last admitted that Nuclear Test Veterans were subjected to extremes of ionizing radiation and their genetically disordered children and widows may now claim compensation. Most veterans who participated are long dead but one or two of us cling on.
If you know of any suffering veterans or their families please draw the Leaflet to their attention . it has cost the MOD a fortune in City of London barrister fees fighting this disgraceful lost cause.
 

artthefart

Midshipman
Information for British Nuclear Test Veterans Over 20,000 military personnel were present at the UK nuclear weapon tests between 1952 and 1967 in Australia and the South Pacific. The tests were the largest tri-service event since the D-Day landings. The protection, health and welfare of those involved in the operations was a vital consideration. The tests were carried out to the highest contemporary radiological standards, minimising fallout. The UK conducted 12 major nuclear weapon tests in Australia between 1952 and 1957. The explosions occurred at the Montebello Islands, Emu Field and Maralinga. A few hundred smaller scale tests were conducted at both Emu Field and Maralinga between 1953 and 1963. A set of four nuclear weapon test series were also carried out by the UK in 1957 and 1958 at Malden Island and Christmas Island in the Pacific Ocean as part of the British hydrogen bomb programme. In total nine nuclear explosions were initiated as part of this series. Health Studies In response to health concerns of some Nuclear Test Veterans in the 1980s, the Ministry of Defence commissioned an independent study into mortality and cancer incidence among nuclear test participants. The first report was published in 1988 with two follow up reports in 1993 and 2003. The studies compared the overall mortality and, cancer incidence and mortality, in over 20,000 participants with that of a similar-sized control group of ex-servicemen who were age-matched, had served around the same time and had deployed overseas but had not participated in the tests. A comparison was also made with the UK general community. The third NRPB study published in 2003 followed the groups to the end of 1998 when cause of death was established for 23% of participants and controls. Interest in the health of nuclear test veterans has continued and in 2017/18 the Public Health England (PHE) review of study information found that about 55% of those present at the tests had now died, meaning that the statistical power of any further study to detect differences in the mortality of cancer incidence and mortality would be greatly increased. The Fourth study, commissioned in 2018, will extend the analysis by a further almost 20 years, again considering overall mortality and cancer incidence and mortality and comparing Veterans present at the tests with a control group of age and sex matched Veterans serving at the same time but who were not Nuclear Test Veterans, and also with the UK general population. It will also consider variations in risk in the groups with time. As the fourth study is part of a series, the methodology and outcomes studied must remain the same as in the other three in the series to produce meaningful results. The report is expected in mid-2020 and the intention is to submit for publication in the mainstream scientific literature. Departmental policy on ionising radiation related compensation will be reviewed in light of the findings and, if appropriate, revised. Compensation claims for Ionising Radiation Related Disorders – MOD’s current policy. Veterans, including Nuclear Test Veterans, who believe they have suffered ill health due to service can apply for no-fault compensation under the War Pensions Scheme which has no time limits and a low standard of proof – more information on how to claim is on page 5. A revised departmental policy statement on claims for ionising radiation related disorders was published in December 2017. This updated the previous (first) radiation policy dated 2003 which was informed by contemporary understanding of the effects of ionising radiation and the NRPB reports to that date. The 2017 departmental policy reflected the several international reports and papers on the adverse health effects appearing from 2003. The policy document content was validated by PHE and the Independent Medical Expert Group (IMEG). Having carefully considered the overall contemporary medical and scientific published peer-reviewed literature in the context of the war pensions onus and standard of proof, the normal policy in war pensions is that there is reliable evidence to raise a reasonable doubt that there may be a causal link between ionising radiation exposure and the following cancers:- Entitlement is accepted, as a presumption, and without consideration of case specific facts for leukaemia (other than chronic lymphatic leukaemia) having onset within 25 years of first presence at the test sites as described above. The policy is however, not an acknowledgement that those present at the tests were exposed to harm
 

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
Nice bit of cut and paste Norman. I'd find it more interesting if you gave some background on you Naval career after you left HMS Raleigh, to date all I can make out is that you went into the Foreign/Diplomatic Service, which doesn't make a lot sense to me.
 

Ballistic

War Hero
Nice bit of cut and paste Norman. I'd find it more interesting if you gave some background on you Naval career after you left HMS Raleigh, to date all I can make out is that you went into the Foreign/Diplomatic Service, which doesn't make a lot sense to me.
Don't hold your breath... :rolleyes:
 

Dredd

War Hero
Super Moderator
Information for British Nuclear Test Veterans Over 20,000 military personnel were present at the UK nuclear weapon tests between 1952 and 1967 in Australia and the South Pacific. The tests were the largest tri-service event since the D-Day landings. The protection, health and welfare of those involved in the operations was a vital consideration. The tests were carried out to the highest contemporary radiological standards, minimising fallout. The UK conducted 12 major nuclear weapon tests in Australia between 1952 and 1957. The explosions occurred at the Montebello Islands, Emu Field and Maralinga. A few hundred smaller scale tests were conducted at both Emu Field and Maralinga between 1953 and 1963. A set of four nuclear weapon test series were also carried out by the UK in 1957 and 1958 at Malden Island and Christmas Island in the Pacific Ocean as part of the British hydrogen bomb programme. In total nine nuclear explosions were initiated as part of this series. Health Studies In response to health concerns of some Nuclear Test Veterans in the 1980s, the Ministry of Defence commissioned an independent study into mortality and cancer incidence among nuclear test participants. The first report was published in 1988 with two follow up reports in 1993 and 2003. The studies compared the overall mortality and, cancer incidence and mortality, in over 20,000 participants with that of a similar-sized control group of ex-servicemen who were age-matched, had served around the same time and had deployed overseas but had not participated in the tests. A comparison was also made with the UK general community. The third NRPB study published in 2003 followed the groups to the end of 1998 when cause of death was established for 23% of participants and controls. Interest in the health of nuclear test veterans has continued and in 2017/18 the Public Health England (PHE) review of study information found that about 55% of those present at the tests had now died, meaning that the statistical power of any further study to detect differences in the mortality of cancer incidence and mortality would be greatly increased. The Fourth study, commissioned in 2018, will extend the analysis by a further almost 20 years, again considering overall mortality and cancer incidence and mortality and comparing Veterans present at the tests with a control group of age and sex matched Veterans serving at the same time but who were not Nuclear Test Veterans, and also with the UK general population. It will also consider variations in risk in the groups with time. As the fourth study is part of a series, the methodology and outcomes studied must remain the same as in the other three in the series to produce meaningful results. The report is expected in mid-2020 and the intention is to submit for publication in the mainstream scientific literature. Departmental policy on ionising radiation related compensation will be reviewed in light of the findings and, if appropriate, revised. Compensation claims for Ionising Radiation Related Disorders – MOD’s current policy. Veterans, including Nuclear Test Veterans, who believe they have suffered ill health due to service can apply for no-fault compensation under the War Pensions Scheme which has no time limits and a low standard of proof – more information on how to claim is on page 5. A revised departmental policy statement on claims for ionising radiation related disorders was published in December 2017. This updated the previous (first) radiation policy dated 2003 which was informed by contemporary understanding of the effects of ionising radiation and the NRPB reports to that date. The 2017 departmental policy reflected the several international reports and papers on the adverse health effects appearing from 2003. The policy document content was validated by PHE and the Independent Medical Expert Group (IMEG). Having carefully considered the overall contemporary medical and scientific published peer-reviewed literature in the context of the war pensions onus and standard of proof, the normal policy in war pensions is that there is reliable evidence to raise a reasonable doubt that there may be a causal link between ionising radiation exposure and the following cancers:- Entitlement is accepted, as a presumption, and without consideration of case specific facts for leukaemia (other than chronic lymphatic leukaemia) having onset within 25 years of first presence at the test sites as described above. The policy is however, not an acknowledgement that those present at the tests were exposed to harm

Aaaaaaaand . . . breathe.
 

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