Not for me

#4
The best option is to do the time that you signed up for. Seems like you had it easy up to now and having to serve at sea is a bit too difficult for you. Suck it up sweet cheeks...
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#5
I've finally got onboard after a year and a half of training and being on holdover at port and after a couple weeks I've decided this naval life is not for me. I do not see the point is hanging on an extra two years for a career I have no investment in and want to get started on a home one as soon as possible as I'm not young as it is. What's the best course of action to leave service?
As every rating should be aware, they are free to submit notice to quit in the first six months, after serving four weeks. Thereafter, for most branches, the individual must then complete their phase two training and then serve 30 months return of service until eligible to submit 12-months notice to quit.

If in doubt, as indicated above, speak to your divisional officer who will be happy to produce a copy of the contract you signed upon entry.

For Officers roughly the same rules apply, but again, the divisional system is the correct avenue to use for definitive guidance.

Good luck.
 
#6
My DO is a bit of an old school hard arse stuck in the times, doesn't really make time to talk
Obviously you’re best placed to say that, you know them, but appearances can be deceptive. Try them, it’s their job and you might be surprised. Failing that, you are entitled to ask to speak to another DO.

Text in a box is not a good way of holding conversations. Nuances that would be obvious face-to-face get missed and it is easy for mid-understandings to occur. Sympathy may be less forthcoming for example.

I’ll say again, the internet is not the place to seek a solution. Speak to a real person, preferably within your divisional system.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#7
The Return of Service (RoS) aspect of the contract, for those unaware is to minimise the potential for individuals to join to earn both a wage and vocational qualifications and then leaving without doing the job for which they have been paid and trained.

The most common branch where this contractual obligation caused disquiet, used to be Artificers who were under training for four years and had to then complete 3.5 years return of service before able to submit 18 months notice to quit - ie: Serve a minimum of 9 years.
 
#8
Inclined to see this as a wind-up so I'll not bite as it is beyond belief that even the dumbest scrote imaginable would still be well aware of his/her obligations regarding return of service at each stage of training and service.
 
#9
Colombian marching powder off the CO's desk ought to do it.

Other than that. Do your RoS, and make the best of it. Decide what you want to do in the future and learn skills that will help you in this career.

Do you have a plan for post-RN?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#10
Colombian marching powder off the CO's desk ought to do it.
It certainly will.

As long as the individual doesn't intend working after discharge, an administrative discharge for gross misconduct will not unduly affect their future plans. Likewise doing a runner is another tried and tested method. Snag is the lack of a future state pension, an arrest warrant and frozen pay account can be a bit of a bummer. Both also put the kibosh on emigration prospects in many cases.
 

wave_dodger

MIA
Book Reviewer
#11
Colombian marching powder off the CO's desk ought to do it.
Chaps [multiple] who worked for me some time ago all tried that gag - it did indeed accelerate their departure from the RN, with a short stop in a bijou bespoke hotel, but it also hugely impeded their ability to gain meaningful employment in any firm where trust and reliability was valued.

I know it was probably meant tongue in cheek....
 

Seadog

War Hero
Moderator
#13
During my first couple of years in the RN, I had a love hate relationship with the Service. I'm glad that between me and my mentors (some fantastic CPOs and WOs ) 'I got with the programme' and didn't spunk away the opportunities, 'status', connections, friends, experiences and on retirement
(personally ), what is effectively half pay for life.

Get a decent length of service under your belt, a period that lets you experience the good and the not so good, a period that lets future employers know that you can do commitment. If you still don't like it, leave, give your reasons but leave in good grace and remain loyal. You never know, you may change your mind down the line and want to return.
 
#15
It certainly will.

As long as the individual doesn't intend working after discharge, an administrative discharge for gross misconduct will not unduly affect their future plans. Likewise doing a runner is another tried and tested method. Snag is the lack of a future state pension, an arrest warrant and frozen pay account can be a bit of a bummer. Both also put the kibosh on emigration prospects in many cases.
Chaps [multiple] who worked for me some time ago all tried that gag - it did indeed accelerate their departure from the RN, with a short stop in a bijou bespoke hotel, but it also hugely impeded their ability to gain meaningful employment in any firm where trust and reliability was valued.

I know it was probably meant tongue in cheek....
Yes it was certainly tongue in cheek. I'm sure there are easier ways to try and squirm out of the RoS that won't mess up future career opportunities. However, as he's only been on board for a little while, maybe the chap should get his head down, work hard and see how he feels about it in six months time.
 
#19
Where once Jackalb's post stood, the adware is posting ads punting opportunities with 'Deliveroo'. Bicycle required, lights optional.
What, this one?

So basically I've finally got onboard after a year and a half of training and being on holdover at port and after a couple weeks I've decided this naval life is not for me. I do not see the point is hanging on an extra two years for a career I have no investment in and want to get started on a home one as soon as possible as I'm not young as it is. What's the best course of action to leave service?

It would be good to know his/her age (Snowflake?)
His/her branch.
His/her class of ship.
His/her expectations (Millenial instant Chief wanabee?)

He/she might not have any investment in his/her career, but I do, as do a lot of other taxpayers. MTFU petal.
Sympathy? Check out where it sits in my dictionary.
 
#20
Try this solution - Bring back Discharge by Purchase, but this time:

Apply accurate costings to the amount 'invested' to date on the disenchanted scrote, whoops, supplicant:


£sd spent on processing & bringing the average Recruit from initial inquiry to the gates of HMS Raleigh

Plus £sd spent on Part 1 training

Plus £sd spent on Part 2 training for the relevant branch

Plus £sd spent any on any pre-joining courses and on job training

Add the 'Recovery Bill' element for all pay, allowances, travel & uniform received to date,

Cease further wage payments and place the applicant on Close Arrest whilst the above D By P Bill is calculated - with the addition of a daily charge for food & accommodation.

Whilst under Close Arrest, make provision for access to the Padre, DO, Doctor, Dentist, Gymnasium, etc. at the hourly rate appropriate for each of those persons & services - An additional charge which obviously must be added to the total.

Discharge to follow directly the full amount of D by P is received and not before.


Fair? Aye but the expense might prove just a little too much for some poor snowflakes who would just have to knuckle down complete their contracted return of service instead...
 

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