No contact with son at Raleigh

allyballybee

Badgeman
OK, so he's only been there since Sunday and no news is good news etc. But I have heard nothing since he arrived (late due to plane delay), apart from one text on Sunday night asking where his padlocks were. Would it be really bad form to call and check he's OK? Don't even know what Division he's in. By the way, he's 18 not 28 or anything.
 

Real Name

Midshipman
The first week at Raleigh is pretty full on, a lot of information in the day and kit to do in the evening and stress all the time (good fun though).

I would wait until Sunday as we have Church and we can use our phone for about an hour and a half so he could call then, (I call my parents then, so do many others).

Dont call, just text.
 

Cake

Midshipman
The first week at Raleigh is pretty full on, a lot of information in the day and kit to do in the evening and stress all the time (good fun though).

I would wait until Sunday as we have Church and we can use our phone for about an hour and a half so he could call then, (I call my parents then, so do many others).

Dont call, just text.

This.

I didn't hear much from my son when he was at Raleigh so go with 'no news is good news'

The first few weeks are very tough....it's a big transition for them. Drop him a text at the weekend and I'm sure he'll be in touch :)
 

Cake

Midshipman
Looks like he's in Cunningham 37 by the way...you'll receive a pack from the Navy soon with all his course details and how to get in touch with him and the staff.
 

allyballybee

Badgeman
He is probably just too busy, he's needed a lot of support to get this far and I am finding it difficult to switch off but it's time, I'll just have to swap to nagging his brother,to revise for his exams!
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
For as long as I can remember communications with home have always been something of an issue. When I joined, we were given a pre-paid postcard to send home to let our anxious parents know we were still alive.

Nowadays with high tech comms, the non-communicative teenager can ask via Whatsapp where his padlocks are but seemingly not think to send an occasional "I'm still alive"text as they suddenly find there's more to life than digital comms. (Standfast CIS ratings, apparently there isn't ;) )

For many people the sudden cessation of instant two-way communications can be a bit of a shock at first and some recruits need to have their mobile phone surgically removed from their hands without anaesthetic. Some find it literally impossible not to use their mobile during the working day and get themselves into hot water because of it.

Interestingly Royal Marines recruits very often cease all communications for up to two weeks upon first joining and when they do finally ring home, frequently fall asleep whilst in mid conversation, hence the term 'nod' (I jest not).

From the concerned parent's perspective the frustration is genuinely appreciated - you can guarantee the little tinker will be texting his mates/girlfriend on a daily basis. My tip? Send him a simple text: "We've moved house". It usually elicits a fairly prompt response.
 
For as long as I can remember communications with home have always been something of an issue. When I joined, we were given a pre-paid postcard to send home to let our anxious parents know we were still alive.

Nowadays with high tech comms, the non-communicative teenager can ask via Whatsapp where his padlocks are but seemingly not think to send an occassional "I'm still alive"text as they suddenly find there's more to life than digital comms. (Standfast CIS ratings, apparently there isn't ;) )

For many people the sudden cessation of instant two-way communications can be a bit of a shock at first and some recruits need to have their mobile phone surgically removed from their hands without anaesthetic. Some find it literally impossible not to use their mobile during the working day and get themselves into hot water because of it.

Interestingly Royal Marines recruits very often cease all communications for up to two weeks upon first joining and when they do finally ring home, very often fall asleep whilst in mid conversation, hence the term 'nod' (I jest not).

From the concerned parent's perspective the frustration is genuinely appreciated - you can guarantee the little tinker will be texting his mates/girlfriend on a daily basis. My tip? Send him a simple text: "We've moved house". It usually elicits a fairly prompt response.

Gen dit - my parents moved whilst I was at BRNC, but didn't tell me. Do you think they were making a point?!
 

Cake

Midshipman
He is probably just too busy, he's needed a lot of support to get this far and I am finding it difficult to switch off but it's time, I'll just have to swap to nagging his brother,to revise for his exams!

He will continue to need your support ...be prepared for the heartache over the phone ....my advice is go tough love. He might tell you how hard it is, how tired he is, how it's not for him, how he can't do it and all the negative comments....perfectly normal from what I've read on here and what I've personally gone through with my lad. However, he did do it and is now at
Sultan. It's a long 10 weeks for us parents and it's very difficult to switch off.

It'll soon be Easter Leave!
 

pompeyexpat

War Hero
Gen dit - my parents moved whilst I was at BRNC, but didn't tell me. Do you think they were making a point?!

Not wishing to drag the thread away too far from the OP concerns, but I know somebody else that had his Mother move on him while he was away. She was living in a council house in East Kilbride and arranged a house swap to another area while he was on a bomber patrol. He arrived back, went home, opened the front door (because of course he still had a key) and was confronted by two complete strangers sitting in his Mums front room. He never said who was the most surprised, him or the people who found a stranger letting himself into their house.
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
He will continue to need your support ...be prepared for the heartache over the phone ....my advice is go tough love. He might tell you how hard it is, how tired he is, how it's not for him, how he can't do it and all the negative comments....perfectly normal from what I've read on here and what I've personally gone through with my lad. However, he did do it and is now at
Sultan. It's a long 10 weeks for us parents and it's very difficult to switch off.

It'll soon be Easter Leave!
Yep, tough love is definitely what's required. Unfortunately recruits only ring their parents to tell them how awful it all is, how they have to wash and iron everything themselves, how many times we've flogged & keel-hauled them that day, how many thousands of kilometres we've made them run, etc.

The phone goes down, they happily skip off to their next adventure-packed evolution whilst Mum & Dad are cast into a pit of despair and calling their local MP to close down HMS Raleigh for excessive barbarity.

Twas ever thus.

My tip, when you get the the gut-wrenching tirade of how awful it all is, just let them then drain down for a few minutes, say nothing at all. Long pause. Then say; "Sorry what was that? Can you ring me back during the adverts son, I'm watching the Downton repeats. Ta, there's a love. " Click, buzz.
 

allyballybee

Badgeman
Ha that's funny, My husband's parents moved house and forgot to tell him when he was in first year at university, it's become a family legend. He is generally not very communicative, unless you are one of his online gaming pals, and guess what he's going in and CIS!
 

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