New to Raleigh

Zeb

Lantern Swinger
#41
I'm just keeping out of it apart from us mums do like advice and I've had some good on here. I'll continue to message Anxious Mum
 
#45
Lol, right I'm off for vodka, stressful day, wonder what chick flick I can watch?! Frozen? Oh no, Die Hard more my type ha ha ha ha
ET(WE) on submarines is definitely hands on, weapons don't get loaded or maintained by computers. Depending on what role he will specialise in later on (Fire Control, Sonar, Radio or Ordnance) will define how much computerised equipment he'll get to play with. Ordnance tends to be more hands on than all the others.
 
#47
ET(WE) on submarines is definitely hands on, weapons don't get loaded or maintained by computers. Depending on what role he will specialise in later on (Fire Control, Sonar, Radio or Ordnance) will define how much computerised equipment he'll get to play with. Ordnance tends to be more hands on than all the others.
Thank you Wrecker, I wish others could be as helpful and as informative as you (not you dapper) I will pass this info on to him, I think the interviewer has put him off somehow
 
#48
Thank you Wrecker, I wish others could be as helpful and as informative as you (not you dapper) I will pass this info on to him, I think the interviewer has put him off somehow
It sounds like he talked to an ET(WE) whose got a downer on about the mob to me, probably someone who's just got the draft he didn't want. Jack likes to drip ;)
 
#49
Lol sounds familiar, should he discuss it with someone? He said he's going to see the chaplain tomorrow That's not him believe me lol. If he divulges his concerns will they make his life a misery for the next 8 weeks?
 
#50
Lol sounds familiar, should he discuss it with someone? He said he's going to see the chaplain tomorrow That's not him believe me lol. If he divulges his concerns will they make his life a misery for the next 8 weeks?
Raleigh are well used to this TBH so he won't be picked on, the staff want him to pass, not fail, it costs the MoD about £7 -8k just to get people to the gate. He could see his DO and ask to speak to one of the WE instructors in the Submarine School (which is in Raleigh) although he will get a branch lecture on ET(WE) from the school later on.
 

Purple_twiglet

War Hero
Moderator
#53
Lol sounds familiar, should he discuss it with someone? He said he's going to see the chaplain tomorrow That's not him believe me lol. If he divulges his concerns will they make his life a misery for the next 8 weeks?
Nope - the Chaplain is 100% confidential - what is said there stays there. They also generally do good tea and biscuits too.

It seems to me that your son is having two key things happen - firstly he is (like every other recruit in history), realising that life in the RN isn't about constant action, adventure and killing bad guys. 99% of it is actually rather routine, but particularly at RALEIGH, getting the basics is key to be able to progress. Its a culture shock when you come from seeing the recruiting adverts of derring do to suddenly being bollocked for not making a bed properly.
This is entirely natural and causes people to question their commitment, particularly as the 'escape window' gets smaller.

Secondly, he is discovering that the job isn't 100% as described - well thats reality and there isn't much you can do about that. But like I said, he needs to ask his DO to give him the chance to talk to other people in his branch to give him perspective - its easy when feeling low to then seize on negatives and make them the reason for walking.

I am not being cruel, I am not taking the piss. I am reiterating for the third time that the best possible thing you can do now is to simply keep repeating to your son that he needs to talk to his Divisional Officer and Divisional Senior Rate. These two people are utterly key to him - they can set meetings up, talk to others, give him advice and help get him through this blue period.

Its January, he's cold, he's tired, he's going through a difficult period of change - everyone struggles and he is not alone. I 100% guarantee you that everyone else in his class is probably having exactly the same thoughts and chats with their parents / partners; he is not alone in feeling this. BUT your natural desire to want to help your son isn't the best solution for him right now. You can't help him in isolation - but by listening to the advice I and others are giving you, which I'm doing and others are doing precisely because I and others want your son to pass out of RALEIGH in a few weeks time, then that will help him.

He has to talk to his chain of command about how he is feeling. He won't be judged, he won't be fired, he won't be kicked out of the Navy. Its perfectly natural and the system will help and support him - but you need to push him that way. There is nothing else you can do right now that will make a difference - he has to make the first step to speaking to his chain of command.

I and others are not being harsh to you for shits n'giggles - we're genuinely trying to help you through this. But I do think that the problem here is one of communication and expectation. You want to do your utmost to solve the problem but you are discovering that the RN is a strange beast that works to its own rules and structures. You have to realise too that all recruits feel down, all feel blue and all feel pretty bad and moan about it at home - you are worrying because he is away from home and its clear you come across as feeling lost without him there. I do feel for you, and I am not taking the piss or trying to be cruel - I am trying to give you the best advice that will help your son in these circumstances. Its up to you to decide whether to take it or instead feel that I'm being mean to you.
 
#54
Nope - the Chaplain is 100% confidential - what is said there stays there. They also generally do good tea and biscuits too.

It seems to me that your son is having two key things happen - firstly he is (like every other recruit in history), realising that life in the RN isn't about constant action, adventure and killing bad guys. 99% of it is actually rather routine, but particularly at RALEIGH, getting the basics is key to be able to progress. Its a culture shock when you come from seeing the recruiting adverts of derring do to suddenly being bollocked for not making a bed properly.
This is entirely natural and causes people to question their commitment, particularly as the 'escape window' gets smaller.

Secondly, he is discovering that the job isn't 100% as described - well thats reality and there isn't much you can do about that. But like I said, he needs to ask his DO to give him the chance to talk to other people in his branch to give him perspective - its easy when feeling low to then seize on negatives and make them the reason for walking.

I am not being cruel, I am not taking the piss. I am reiterating for the third time that the best possible thing you can do now is to simply keep repeating to your son that he needs to talk to his Divisional Officer and Divisional Senior Rate. These two people are utterly key to him - they can set meetings up, talk to others, give him advice and help get him through this blue period.

Its January, he's cold, he's tired, he's going through a difficult period of change - everyone struggles and he is not alone. I 100% guarantee you that everyone else in his class is probably having exactly the same thoughts and chats with their parents / partners; he is not alone in feeling this. BUT your natural desire to want to help your son isn't the best solution for him right now. You can't help him in isolation - but by listening to the advice I and others are giving you, which I'm doing and others are doing precisely because I and others want your son to pass out of RALEIGH in a few weeks time, then that will help him.

He has to talk to his chain of command about how he is feeling. He won't be judged, he won't be fired, he won't be kicked out of the Navy. Its perfectly natural and the system will help and support him - but you need to push him that way. There is nothing else you can do right now that will make a difference - he has to make the first step to speaking to his chain of command.

I and others are not being harsh to you for shits n'giggles - we're genuinely trying to help you through this. But I do think that the problem here is one of communication and expectation. You want to do your utmost to solve the problem but you are discovering that the RN is a strange beast that works to its own rules and structures. You have to realise too that all recruits feel down, all feel blue and all feel pretty bad and moan about it at home - you are worrying because he is away from home and its clear you come across as feeling lost without him there. I do feel for you, and I am not taking the piss or trying to be cruel - I am trying to give you the best advice that will help your son in these circumstances. Its up to you to decide whether to take it or instead feel that I'm being mean to you.
Wow PT that is the best advice you have given without ridicule and I appreciate it, very much so, so thank you
 

Purple_twiglet

War Hero
Moderator
#55
Wow PT that is the best advice you have given without ridicule and I appreciate it, very much so, so thank you
Thanks - reread my posts in cold light of day. I am genuinely not ridiculing you, I am trying to help you, but you have to realise that your ability as a mum to directly help now is massively diminished. The system will support you and your son, but you have to realise the best thing you can do is direct him through the RN system - they really can help you - its hard when he's away for the first time, but he will thank you in time for steering him to the RN system.

Never forget, right now he and his mates believe that they're having the hardest ever training course in the history of the military. Total bollocks of course - mine was much harder. Kids these days have it easy ;-)
 
#56
One thing to add to what P-T has said, he's just come back from leave, historically this is the time most recruits want to jack it in.

When I was a DO at Raleigh it was a guessing game amongst the staff as to

A) how many wouldn't turn up after leave

B) How many would be knocking on the door asking to PVR (I actually had 6 the 1st Monday back after one Chrimbo leave period)
 
#57
Trust me guys, he's a tough kid, not wet in the slightest and I've never ever been a soft mum, I'm single so I can't. I just want him to talk to someone who'll give him a second opinion as this one person has put him off.
PT - trust me I'm no soft arse missing her baby, course I miss him but I want him to have a life, not here wasting it at tesco. I do take on board all you say, honest
 
#60
Yet you seem to be confused at why some people aren't "helping" you. Seems to me your definition of helping is confused with you being told what you want to hear.

Your son is in the armed forces now tough love is expected, people are trying to help you....just seems you don't agree with how things are done now
 

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