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"New Bursary To Get Veterans Into Teaching"

SONAR-BENDER

War Hero
Cheers Sol!

Nice try Government, but I'd need a shedload more bribe financial enducement than that to enter into battle with some of these little darlings.

I know at least 3 teachers who have bailed out recently after many years of teaching. Also, our God daughter has recently had to leave after several attacks from pupils (including bitten twice, once on the face, with attendant HIV/HepC checks) and getting no support from the school - which was a PRIMARY school! Good area too.

Nope - teaching at RNSMS was enough for me!
 

Sumo

War Hero
Cheers Sol!

Nice try Government, but I'd need a shedload more bribe financial enducement than that to enter into battle with some of these little darlings.

I know at least 3 teachers who have bailed out recently after many years of teaching. Also, our God daughter has recently had to leave after several attacks from pupils (including bitten twice, once on the face, with attendant HIV/HepC checks) and getting no support from the school - which was a PRIMARY school! Good area too.

Nope - teaching at RNSMS was enough for me!
have to agree, my son trained and became a Physics Teacher, he was respected by the kids, 6'4" brick shithouse, but found the work load was crap, working 3 - 4 hours every night and weekends, with zero support from the senior team, they all seemed to be on job protection, and survival and sod the kids.
to get people to stay in teaching, the whole system needs a shake up, but that will never happen.
 
D

Deleted 59428

Guest
have to agree, my son trained and became a Physics Teacher, he was respected by the kids, 6'4" brick shithouse, but found the work load was crap, working 3 - 4 hours every night and weekends, with zero support from the senior team, they all seemed to be on job protection, and survival and sod the kids.
to get people to stay in teaching, the whole system needs a shake up, but that will never happen.

The Independent sector has no trouble recruiting first class teachers. Why?
 
have to agree, my son trained and became a Physics Teacher, he was respected by the kids, 6'4" brick shithouse, but found the work load was crap, working 3 - 4 hours every night and weekends, with zero support from the senior team, they all seemed to be on job protection, and survival and sod the kids.
to get people to stay in teaching, the whole system needs a shake up, but that will never happen.

The Independent sector has no trouble recruiting first class teachers. Why?

Because they can convince Chinese and other international parents to pay £10,000s/year to send their kids to a hogwarts-esque experience and use that to cross subsidise the minority of Brit pupils in the class?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
You may change your mind if you read the article I read yesterday. Sat in the Hospital waiting room usual standard of old mags. There was a fairly comprehensive article on the mistreatment of boys, both by brutality and homosexuality. This focused mainly on the prep school environment. one point that the author raised ( he had been a victim himself) was that some parents chose to ignore it because to raise a fuss would possibly spoil the chances of the off spring going to Eton (or whatever). There was/is no doubt that a lot of the goings on are hidden/overlooked. When caught out all to often the culprit is allowed to leave one school and take a position elsewhere.
 
The Independent sector has no trouble recruiting first class teachers. Why?

Perhaps because generally independent schools are fee paying schools. As such most, if not all of the pupils there are there to learn and will have come from a stable background with family support that expects them to tow the line and learn.

Teaching kids in that situation is a lot easier. Chances are that expulsion is rare but would be backed up by the senior staff and that the teachers would not be hung out to dry.

How would these "first class teachers" cope in an under-performing inner city school? Probably no better than the teachers there and probably worse as they have not been exposed to the biting, kicking, punching or general abuse that state school teachers have to deal with.
 

dapperdunn

War Hero
Book Reviewer
I went to public school and work in a state school.
In my experiance, Public school was an absolute nightmare. I hated pretty much every minute of it, but was too afraid of my father to tell him that I wanted to come home as that would represent failure. Public school at that time (late 70's) was a bully's paradise.
I now work in the state school sector. Don't believe everything you read in the Daily Mail about teachers being assaulted and overworked. There is some of that happening, but not as much as you would be made to think. Teachers work, but no more than everyone else. Teachers here start at 08:40 and finish at 15:00. No weekend work and 12 weeks paid holidays. The further up the pole you get the more responsibility you have, the more hours you work, the more you get paid.
There are 'problem children' but they are well known and dealt with appropriately. I don't suppose that there are more of them now than there were before, its just that now they have a label. (ADHD etc.) There is also more publicity and gossip that would have been confined to the immediate area around the school. It spreads worldwide now due to social media and the arrival of the outrage bus.
There are some general social issues in society today that have more effect on kids now than they did before. There are more absent fathers today than back in the golden, glorious past for example.
 
D

Deleted 59428

Guest
I went to public school and work in a state school.
In my experiance, Public school was an absolute nightmare. I hated pretty much every minute of it, but was too afraid of my father to tell him that I wanted to come home as that would represent failure. Public school at that time (late 70's) was a bully's paradise.
I now work in the state school sector. Don't believe everything you read in the Daily Mail about teachers being assaulted and overworked. There is some of that happening, but not as much as you would be made to think. Teachers work, but no more than everyone else. Teachers here start at 08:40 and finish at 15:00. No weekend work and 12 weeks paid holidays. The further up the pole you get the more responsibility you have, the more hours you work, the more you get paid.
There are 'problem children' but they are well known and dealt with appropriately. I don't suppose that there are more of them now than there were before, its just that now they have a label. (ADHD etc.) There is also more publicity and gossip that would have been confined to the immediate area around the school. It spreads worldwide now due to social media and the arrival of the outrage bus.
There are some general social issues in society today that have more effect on kids now than they did before. There are more absent fathers today than back in the golden, glorious past for example.

Its the strength of the teachers not the weakness of the inmates The pillow fights were just too much for your sensitive disposition presumably.
 

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
P As such most, if not all of the pupils there are there to learn and will have come from a stable background with family support that expects them to tow the line and learn.

Wide sweeping statement there, my experience says that a fair few of the kids at private schools come from homes were the parents have split or have domestic difficulties, the difference being that because their parents have money they are sent to boarding school and so removed from the environment which poorer kids may be forced to live with.
 
I went to public school and work in a state school.
In my experiance, Public school was an absolute nightmare. I hated pretty much every minute of it, but was too afraid of my father to tell him that I wanted to come home as that would represent failure. Public school at that time (late 70's) was a bully's paradise.
I now work in the state school sector. Don't believe everything you read in the Daily Mail about teachers being assaulted and overworked. There is some of that happening, but not as much as you would be made to think. Teachers work, but no more than everyone else. Teachers here start at 08:40 and finish at 15:00. No weekend work and 12 weeks paid holidays. The further up the pole you get the more responsibility you have, the more hours you work, the more you get paid.
There are 'problem children' but they are well known and dealt with appropriately. I don't suppose that there are more of them now than there were before, its just that now they have a label. (ADHD etc.) There is also more publicity and gossip that would have been confined to the immediate area around the school. It spreads worldwide now due to social media and the arrival of the outrage bus.
There are some general social issues in society today that have more effect on kids now than they did before. There are more absent fathers today than back in the golden, glorious past for example.

While not believing everything written in the Daily Fail, I have two daughters that went to a good state primary school and each had at least one disruptive (labelled) person in their class. They had to put up with being spat on frequently, punched and kicked and were not allowed to retaliate. The teachers faced the same. The parents did not want the kids moved to other schools and blamed other parents for not supporting them. In days gone by the kids with genuine issues would have gone to specialist schools. It does not happen now due to inclusion being the preferred (cheapest) option.

You must be lucky where you work. My neighbour was a primary teacher and worked until 6pm daily and still had marking etc to catch up on at the weekend. She was not a senior teacher but still had a considerable workload.
 
D

Deleted 59428

Guest
£36,000 would seem to around the starting point for a reasonable school.
Free, more or less, if you join the Armed Forces , The Diplomatic Service or what remains of the Colonial Service. My two daughters received a first class education both here and overseas. Didn't cost my wife and me a penny.
 
D

Deleted 59428

Guest
Wide sweeping statement there, my experience says that a fair few of the kids at private schools come from homes were the parents have split or have domestic difficulties, the difference being that because their parents have money they are sent to boarding school and so removed from the environment which poorer kids may be forced to live with.

The independent Schools I am familiar with refers to children as children and not as something related to goats. Teachers, whether male or female were addressed as "Sir".
 

Sumo

War Hero
when pusser was willing to puck up the bill we asked our children did they want to go away to school ? They said no, end of that, they went to local schools, all schools have a level of bullying, teaching your kids how to handle bullies and not to be a victim, is very difficult, but well worth the effort, but encourage them to tell someone is important.
Their biggest challenge. Was having a matelot ( child) for a dad?
 

Taztiff

War Hero
I went to State School - (Secondary Modern as it used to be.)

This was followed by a year in a Public School environment - or HMS Fisgard as we called it.

Bit of sprogging by the older classes but we never thought about giving the teachers (also known as GI's and PTI's) any grief! And the schoolies were commissioned officers so they were untouchable as well!

(Now waiting for all the special children to start spitting at me - tiffs! :D)
 
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