New book recommendation wanted - castaway type

#1
I finished "The Island of Dr Moreau" (mentioned in another thread). As with any castaway book written in the first person, he escaped, although is a little traumatised by the whole thing, which is understandable after a year on a small island shared with monsters, a mad scientist and a drunken medical student. Especially as his his faithful man-dog monster was killed.

Not as good as "The War of the Worlds" but HG Wells definitely deserves his fame.

Anyway, to the point... I would like to read a good account of a genuine desert island castaway if such a thing exists. Having seen the Tom Hanks film, read the above, The Lord of the Flies and probably others, I'd like read 'the real thing'. No monsters required.

Any recommendations? RR seems the right place to ask!
 
#2
You could try "Castaway" by Lucy Irvine, my wife read it and thought it was good. From what I gather it's about some bloke who advertises for a wife to live with him on a desert island. Was made into a film with Oliver Reed/Amanda Donnahue but apparently the book much better. Then of course, always Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe....
 
#3
Castaway by Lucy Irvine was a good read;
basically about a woman (the author) who answered an advert for a 'wife' to spend time on an island with a author/write but ends up spending time on a desserted island with a husband who she doesn't really know that well.

It's really, more on the lines of a fantasy romance crossed over with tom hank's castaway, like a journal but it is a good read.

Fantasy type books;

Magic Bites Kate Daniels - It's a good read, if you like this type of book. I've pasted in what is written on Anazon, sums it up pretty well;

This is one of the best-realized fantasy worlds I've encountered in a debut novel. Our heroine, Kate, lives in an alternate Atlanta, where magic and technology come in unpredictable waves. When her guardian is killed, she seeks out the murderer using some hilarious concepts of investigation.

If you are a paranormal romance reader, this book may not be for you. Despite its title, "Magic Bites" falls strongly on the fantasy end of the continuum. "Magic Bites" is both a very good fantasy and mystery and you can get easily drawn in--as long as you are not too disappointed there is not a strong romance line in the novel.

Another warning, if you are someone who thinks vampires are dead sexy, this book does not ascribe to this point of view. Vampires are nobody's erotic fantasy in this novel and that makes them particularly interesting.

World building is critical to the fantasy genre and Ms. Andrews has earned a 5 star rating just for that. The rules for her world are pretty clear and she sticks to them. She's obviously carefully considered the eventualities of phases where magic and technology rule the city and keeps things interesting with the changes she puts her characters through.

Kate is a well-realized and interesting character. She's someone you can empathize with and she's got a pretty darn good sense of humor. I see shades of Raymond Chandler in this book in the humor.

Also, Andrews resolves her mystery in this book, but leaves you with enough questions to want to read her next novel in this series. I, for one, hope the novel comes soon, but I think she will be well worth the wait
 
#4
Jenny_Dabber said:
Castaway by Lucy Irvine was a good read;
basically about a woman (the author) who answered an advert for a 'wife' to spend time on an island with a author/write but ends up spending time on a desserted island with a husband who she doesn't really know that well.

It's really, more on the lines of a fantasy romance crossed over with tom hank's castaway, like a journal but it is a good read.

Fantasy type books;

Magic Bites Kate Daniels - It's a good read, if you like this type of book. I've pasted in what is written on Anazon, sums it up pretty well;

This is one of the best-realized fantasy worlds I've encountered in a debut novel. Our heroine, Kate, lives in an alternate Atlanta, where magic and technology come in unpredictable waves. When her guardian is killed, she seeks out the murderer using some hilarious concepts of investigation.

If you are a paranormal romance reader, this book may not be for you. Despite its title, "Magic Bites" falls strongly on the fantasy end of the continuum. "Magic Bites" is both a very good fantasy and mystery and you can get easily drawn in--as long as you are not too disappointed there is not a strong romance line in the novel.

Another warning, if you are someone who thinks vampires are dead sexy, this book does not ascribe to this point of view. Vampires are nobody's erotic fantasy in this novel and that makes them particularly interesting.

World building is critical to the fantasy genre and Ms. Andrews has earned a 5 star rating just for that. The rules for her world are pretty clear and she sticks to them. She's obviously carefully considered the eventualities of phases where magic and technology rule the city and keeps things interesting with the changes she puts her characters through.

Kate is a well-realized and interesting character. She's someone you can empathize with and she's got a pretty darn good sense of humor. I see shades of Raymond Chandler in this book in the humor.

Also, Andrews resolves her mystery in this book, but leaves you with enough questions to want to read her next novel in this series. I, for one, hope the novel comes soon, but I think she will be well worth the wait
Thank for the tip on Castaway. I was actually after a true account - autobiographical is the correct way of describing it I suppose.
 
#5
How about;

Castaway in Paradise: The Incredible Adventures of True-Life Robinson Crusoes

The review says;

Alexander Selkirk, a difficult and unpleasant British sailor, was put ashore at his own request on Mas a Tierra Island off the coast of Chile in 1704 and remained alone there until 1709. His story came to the attention of Daniel Defoe, and thereby hangs a tradition. Although isolated, Selkirk, upon whom Defoe modeled his fictional hero Robinson Crusoe, did not have a terribly trying situation, for he had fresh water, fruit, wild goats, shellfish and certain amenities. Others in comparable situations were not so fortunate, as Simmons ( The Big Book of Adventure Travel ) makes clear in these accounts of eight castaways--some by coercion, some by their own choice--ranging from the 18th century to (believe it or not) 1977. Just as the adventures of Selkirk/Crusoe enthralled readers in 1719, the chronicles here will surely prove exciting to readers today.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
 
#6
An Island to one's self - Tom Neale

I haven't read this but my mum did, she said it was worth every minute and is a true account.

It's about a man, that in his 50's decides to attempt ' a robinson's crusoe'.
 
#7
Newer! I'm not expecting complaints about lack of facilities to charge the ipod, but 19th or 20th century would be good. Don't want much do I?
 
#8
Jenny_Dabber said:
An Island to one's self - Tom Neale

I haven't read this but my mum did, she said it was worth every minute and is a true account.

It's about a man, that in his 50's decides to attempt ' a robinson's crusoe'.
Just the job. Thankd JD. Will look on ebay now.
 
#11
How about a collective?

Desperate Journeys, Abandoned Souls: True Stories of Castaways and Other Survivors

With painstaking research, riveting detail and elegant prose, freelance writer Leslie here creates a keen psychological study as well as a paean to the courage, resourcefulness and perseverance of the human body and mind. This is a hefty chronicle of true stories, from the 1500s to the present day, about survivors of shipwrecks, maroonings and plane crashes, lost in every sort of climate and environment, struggling against animals, humans--savage and civilized--and the forces of nature. There is Peter Carder, who sailed in the 16th century with Drake, was castaway once and twice marooned, ingratiated himself with Brazilian cannibals and outwitted his Portuguese enemies. Leslie insightfully describes the real "Robinson Crusoe," Alexander Selkirk, a sailing master who quarreled with his captain and was stranded for four years on an island paradise off the coast of Chile in the early 1700s. The account of Marguerite de la Roque, a 16th century French woman who was betrayed as an adulterer by her adventurer cousin on an Atlantic voyage and then left to die, pregnant, on an island off the coast of Canada with her servant and her lover, is affecting. But for sheer thrills and inspiration, readers will be fascinated by the tale of the ill-planned and ill-fated Stefansson Polar expedition of 1913. Illustrated.

Or a slightly different type of 'castaway';

Jungle: A Harrowing True Story of Survival - Yossi Ghinsberg

Jungle has Yossi, an Israeli, hooking up with two companions and a guide to experience the jungles of South America. The tale of their survival, particularly Yossi's survival when he becomes lost, is captivating and difficult to put down. The backdrop of human nature adds an emotional element to the story.

It was survival of the fittest, and in this situation, the weakest link became despised. The disappointing factor is that at the time when Kevin and Yossi began to despise Marcus, the journey's difficulty seemed minor.

After the emotional abuse, I found it difficult to care for the author's plight. One can only imagine the suffering and confusion that Marcus felt at the betrayal of his friends during a painful and difficult journey. It must have been painful for Yossi to tell his story honestly.

The book would have benefited from photos, even if they were not photos of the actual journey but of the return trip or group shots before the journey.
 
#13
John Dollar is nor true though as far as I can see from Amazon.

Thanks JD - I'll have a look at the second. I suppose being stranded on desert islands isn't as common as hollywood / fiction would have you believe!
 
#14
Good_CO said:
John Dollar is nor true though as far as I can see from Amazon.

Thanks JD - I'll have a look at the second. I suppose being stranded on desert islands isn't as common as hollywood / fiction would have you believe!
Hi CO - no not true - but like all the best fiction very plausible :thumright:
 
#15
Good_CO said:
I finished "The Island of Dr Moreau" (mentioned in another thread). As with any castaway book written in the first person, he escaped, although is a little traumatised by the whole thing, which is understandable after a year on a small island shared with monsters, a mad scientist and a drunken medical student. Especially as his his faithful man-dog monster was killed.

Not as good as "The War of the Worlds" but HG Wells definitely deserves his fame.

Anyway, to the point... I would like to read a good account of a genuine desert island castaway if such a thing exists. Having seen the Tom Hanks film, read the above, The Lord of the Flies and probably others, I'd like read 'the real thing'. No monsters required.

Any recommendations? RR seems the right place to ask!
I can't remember the name of the book, but the author was a bloke called DeEnemy, or something like that anyway.
 

wet_blobby

War Hero
Moderator
#16
Not your classic desert Island castaway but the book "Alive" is far better than the film. (Arn't they always?)

It's about the rugby team that crashes in the andes, poor [email protected], there was a fully stocked hut about a mile away but the went looking in the other direction.
 
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