Navy Engineering Help

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by Sphere, Apr 1, 2008.

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  1. Afternoon everyone,

    New here, but have been scouting around the posts.

    Thinking about joining the Navy in a technical role (Engineering Technician). All types seem interesting but I am leaning towards AET or ET(ME) (General service or Submariner) from the info on website. What do people think of these jobs?

    Some specifics:

    A.) I have read that there is a "fast-track" scheme (if you are good enough!) in the AET world. This sounds good as I am keen to get on and progress. Is this fast track available in the other eng disciplines?

    B.) Are hand/machine craft skills still taught at part of ET training? I have read some stuff on here that this area has been really cut back. I love working with tools/workshop machines. Is there still a need for brazing/welding/metal work/carpentry etc Also using lathes/milling machines etc to produce stuff? Which branch offers the most chance of learning (and using!) these skills?

    C.) I presume all eng jobs offer good skills for after the RN? Any more than others? AET maybe?

    Thanks and regards

    Sphere
     
  2. sphere

    obviously i am a bit biased but would not do any other job but FAA. there is a FT scheme available which requires a lot of hard work whilst at Sultan doing your Phase II training but is certainly doable.

    ETME is again a worthwhile and interesting trade, with engines, just a lot bigger - it just depends where you would rather work,

    flight deck or engine room.

    the promotion in the FAA is very quick if you want it.

    finally if you want to go to see a lot go ME, if you would rather join a ship late, leave early, depart halfeway through for detatchments in hotels, be part of a select and closeknit bunch, be acknowledged as teh creme de la creme by all

    AWAITING FLAK

    Then join as an AET
     
  3. Hello mate,

    As an ME with over 19 years experience, I would say definately go either AE or WE.
    Honestly :)
     
  4. Fast track AET equals academic ability plus hard work.
    ETME more hands on with manufacturing processes.
    AET more servicing orientated changing components but little or no manufacture in your early career. Certain AE jobs do require skill of hand, training has reduced since my day however, Sheetmetal workshops, the odd Machine shop job and MASU repair offer hands role.
    Again your exposure to sea service will effect your decision.
    ETME more than half your life at sea.
    AE considerably less ( 6 days in 22 years for me, and not all in one go)

    My choice AE, it requires one of the highest RT scores to be accepted. A good standard of Maths and Science is required. Work hard now to ensure success.
     
  5. Ive heard a buzz that because the turnaround for ET (ME)s to go back to sea is too slow thay are reintroducing the apprentice. Is this true?
     
  6. chieftiff

    chieftiff War Hero Moderator

    You are going to get varied opinion on this and it's going to be subjective but............. something to think about.

    If you really want to use those hands on skills like milling, turning etc then that is just not going to happen as an AET, nowaday's things don't get repaired in service and that is a trend not set to change, we just replace stuff when it's broken. Your best bet is probably ME, bigger engines and more agricultural (traditional) engineering skills. The prospect to continue this line of work post service is currently endless (there are 2 thousand jobs advertised every week in a certain Aberdeen job paper mostly for those of a mechanical engineering persuasion with offshore tickets, good money too)

    But also consider this; do you really want to be suffering wind burn, arc eye, bruised knuckles and cold sores when you're 40? or would a management job in a nice warm office and getting home every night not suit you by then?

    All things to consider.
     
  7. what the heck have you ben up to then
     
  8. chieftiff

    chieftiff War Hero Moderator

    Not me mate, I was on an industry course in Aberdeen last week. Beside the fat wallets, skinned knuckles and hangovers the most obvious sign of an offshore worker seems to be coldsores :thumright:
     
  9. sorry shippers - i understand now , i thought we were reminiscing about 800NAS again and there tendencies to swap spit
     
  10. Skill of hand: 20 years as a WAFU greenie most if my practical skills were used on repairing car bits. Very good training especially useful at home. My uncle was a fishhead greenie (entry 1937) who told me that he had done little skilled work during his career. Equally true of industry so SPHERE has little to worry about.
     
  11. Skill of hand: 20 years as a WAFU greenie most if my practical skills were used on repairing car bits. Very good training especially useful at home. My uncle was a fishhead greenie (entry 1937) who told me that he had done little skilled work during his career. Equally true of industry so SPHERE has little to worry about.
     
  12. Thanks for the advice so far chaps - really useful.

    Seems a shame that skill at hand traning has been reduced in navy technical training.

    What sort of workshop skills are taught to ET(ME)s then? I presume the bulk of this would be at Leading Hand level?

    Couple more questions about AET. What are career prosepcts like for commercial aviation if one leaves the navy? I think it is quite hard to get licences? Also someone metioned to me that commercial Air Techs need to be multi-skilled where as the froces straam you to mechanical or avioics?

    Final one for now - If navy AETs are working on the Harrier, what is working with the RAF like? How does the RAF tech traning compare to the Navy (not really considering RAF but am interested!)

    Cheers!
     

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