Naval Related Obituaries

@janner was he a Weymouth SOCA member?
@Sumo, & for the record, SOCA {formerly the S/M Old Comrades Assocn.) was re-named & re-badged as the Submariners Association a few years ago*:

1615962482919.png

See https://www.submarinersassociation.co.uk/home



*4/05/1999. See also this snippet from The B-in-F Branch:

<<...In May 1997 the Branch first heard of the proposal to change the name of the organisation from the Submarine Old Comrades' Association, and some considerable concern was expressed. About the same time there was the first news of the Centenary of the Submarine Service in both Barrow and nationally; there was great enthusiasm for this and a Barrow Committee was formed!

Another overseas visit took place in late 1998 when several members and wives visited the Vancouver and Toronto Branches. In March 1999 a visit to the Tasmania Branch was mooted and in April 2000, three members and their wives visited Australia.

After all the discussions and concerns raised and argued locally and nationally the proposed name change from the Submarine Old Comrades' Association to the Submariners' Association took place, and the first Branch meeting under the new name took place on 4th May 1999. At this time Branch member, John Houlding, was the National Secretary and travelled to many branches nationwide to explain the reasons behind the change from the SOCA to the SA. During 1999 and 2000 planning for the Barrow Submarine Centenary celebrations continued in earnest with more and more branches and local organisations promising support...>>

See http://rnsubs.co.uk/association/branch-history.html
 

Sumo

War Hero
@Sumo, & for the record, SOCA {formerly the S/M Old Comrades Assocn.) was re-named & re-badged as the Submariners Association a few years ago*:

View attachment 57478

See https://www.submarinersassociation.co.uk/home



*4/05/1999. See also this snippet from The B-in-F Branch:

<<...In May 1997 the Branch first heard of the proposal to change the name of the organisation from the Submarine Old Comrades' Association, and some considerable concern was expressed. About the same time there was the first news of the Centenary of the Submarine Service in both Barrow and nationally; there was great enthusiasm for this and a Barrow Committee was formed!

Another overseas visit took place in late 1998 when several members and wives visited the Vancouver and Toronto Branches. In March 1999 a visit to the Tasmania Branch was mooted and in April 2000, three members and their wives visited Australia.

After all the discussions and concerns raised and argued locally and nationally the proposed name change from the Submarine Old Comrades' Association to the Submariners' Association took place, and the first Branch meeting under the new name took place on 4th May 1999. At this time Branch member, John Houlding, was the National Secretary and travelled to many branches nationwide to explain the reasons behind the change from the SOCA to the SA. During 1999 and 2000 planning for the Barrow Submarine Centenary celebrations continued in earnest with more and more branches and local organisations promising support...>>

See http://rnsubs.co.uk/association/branch-history.html
I am sure it was still SOCA (submarine pissing up squad) when I was a member in Weymuff in 2003/2004.
Also remember when SOCA weekend was on at Dolphin, loads of Duty weekenders, trying to get off that week end? Me not knowing what was coming, as I was coming over from Skimmers as a PO, volunteered as Duty PO, it was an interesting weekend.
 

janner

MIA
Book Reviewer
@Sumo I joined the branch around 2001 and it was certainly SA then, (some of the older members still called it SOCA). I think around 2002 James Perone was the guest of honour at the dinner when he suggested that a Memorial should be considered for those that lost their lives in the Sidon. Memorial was unveiled 16 June 2005 (50th anniversary)
 

Sumo

War Hero
@Sumo I joined the branch around 2001 and it was certainly SA then, (some of the older members still called it SOCA). I think around 2002 James Perone was the guest of honour at the dinner when he suggested that a Memorial should be considered for those that lost their lives in the Sidon. Memorial was unveiled 16 June 2005 (50th anniversary)
I think I mentioned before when David H passed his planning permission submission around, I mentioned all his measurements were in cm and not M, very small monument that would have been. Then the saga in the office that the stone mason instructor at weymuff college, who was going to work the stone, had been sacked and the stone donated from a Portland quarry for the memorial had been cut up by the college for other use? Challenge for David but he got the college to resupply stone.
Also sure my member ship card, small blue card said SOCA, but that was a long time ago, using old stock?
 

Dusty70

War Hero

Warrant Officer Diver Terry Settle, expert in mine clearance – obituary​

Lauded for his coolness under pressure, he carried out lifesaving work across the globe, from the Gulf of Suez to the Mediterranean

ByTelegraph Obituaries31 March 2021 • 6:11pm

Terry Settle with his family outside Buckingham Palace: during his career he was appointed MBE and was awarded the British Empire Medal and the Queen’s Medal for Gallantry

Terry Settle with his family outside Buckingham Palace: during his career he was appointed MBE and was awarded the British Empire Medal and the Queen’s Medal for Gallantry
Warrant Officer Diver Terry Settle, who has died aged 76, was one of Britain’s most highly decorated postwar clearance divers.
In September 1984 Settle led a team of divers, part of an international effort known as Operation Harling, to investigate after a score of ships were mysteriously damaged by mines thought to have been laid by the Libyan ruler Muammar Gaddafi in the Gulf of Suez.
There, the minehunter Gavinton found a strange object in 23 fathoms at the exit of the Suez Canal. Despite poor underwater visibility, Settle carefully photographed and measured the mine-like object, which was clean but half-buried, nose-down in mud.
Using airbags Settle, aware that any fuse might contain a hydrostat, towed the mine into shallower water. Surmising that this was a new type of Soviet mine, and after borrowing the correct-sized Soviet spanner from the Egyptian navy, Settle succeeded in disassembling the detonator and primer and steaming out 600 kg of explosive.
Settle with his MBE

Settle with his MBE
For his remarkable courage, dedication and professionalism shown over several days, Settle was awarded the Queen’s Medal for Gallantry.
The following year, in February in the Persian Gulf, the supertanker Fellowship L was hit by an Iraqi air-launched, French-supplied, Exocet missile, which failed to explode. Asked if he could be ready in three weeks to investigate, Settle answered, “Twelve hours max”, and he and his team flew by commercial airliner to Dubai.
The missile had hit six feet above the waterline in the forward tank, which contained 25,000 tons of crude oil. The manufacturers declined to share the render-safe procedure, so, after the oil had been pumped out, Settle deduced from first principles how best to deal with the missile, which lay, with its warhead and some of its fuel still intact, 100 feet down at the bottom of the tank.
In the heat and fumes, he had the Exocet lifted on to the deck and put his know-how to work: asked by an assistant: “What happens if it blows up?” he replied: “Don’t worry, you and I won’t know about it”. Eventually the remains of the Exocet were taken out into deep water and dumped.
With Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex

With Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex
That same year, Settle’s Fleet Clearance Diving Team was sent to Malta to clear Grand Harbour of wartime ordnance. British forces had been banished from the island by the prime minister Dom Mintoff but, working incognito, Settle and his divers removed tons of small arms, munitions and bombs, and cut up wrecks on the seabed despite thick mud, zero visibility, numerous seabed obstructions and the constant danger of unexploded ordnance.
During an operation to remove four live torpedoes, Settle closed the harbour, something that not even the Germans had managed in wartime. Mintoff became a regular visitor to view Settle’s progress.
Settle was appointed MBE.
Terence Settle was born on February 2 1945 in Epping, Essex, where his mother had been evacuated from Tottenham: his father was a naval diver who had helped clear the Suez Canal in 1942/43 and was subsequently cox’un of Landing Ship Tank 421 at Sicily, Salerno, Anzio and Normandy. Young Settle was educated at Chase Lane primary and Sidney Burnell secondary modern but “was only ever going to join the Navy”.
At the Vernon Monument in Portsmouth which honours those involved in mine warfare, diving, and bomb and mine disposal

At the Vernon Monument in Portsmouth which honours those involved in mine warfare, diving, and bomb and mine disposal
He joined as a Boy Seaman in 1960. A car accident in Hong Kong threatened to end his career, but he recovered and took part in the Konfrontasi in the frigate Berwick, and in the withdrawal from Aden in the frigate Ajax.
In a 25-year career as diver, besides his awards for major explosive ordnance disposal, Settle was three times awarded the Commander-in-Chief’s commendations for his bravery and expertise, and in 1980 the BEM.
Before retiring from the Navy in 1995, Settle was an instructor at the Defence Explosive Ordnance Disposal School, and served six months on loan service with the Qatari Defence Forces. He founded Settle For Safety, a health and safety consultancy, and supported the Vernon Monument, recently installed at Gunwharf Quays, Portsmouth, honouring those involved in mine warfare, diving, and bomb and mine disposal.
He is remembered equally for his cool head as for his inspirational leadership.
In 1973 Settle married Margaret “Mags” Ainslie Clark, who survives him with their two sons.
Terry Settle, born February 2 1945, died March 2 2021
 
Top