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Naval Related Obituaries

Champagne surely. I don't recall it being being referred to as bubbly. Mind you I have never had any.
In the RN in the days of an issue of a tot of rum per man the two and one (two parts water one part rum known as Grog) was referred to as bubbly.
 
Two-and-One was issued to General Service junior ratings as well as WAFUs. CPOs and POs had their issue neat.
At onshore establishments the tot was measured out and issued in glasses under the watchful eye of the Officer of the Watch. At sea, a member of the Mess would take the "fanny" (a large metal vessel with two handles on it) to be filled with the issue for all members of the Mess who were G. In the Mess the tot was a daily social event before lunch, each person's issue being dished out by the Killick of the Mess.
The tot was associated with a number of customs. If it was your birthday you enjoyed "sippers" which meant that in addition to your own tot you could have a sip of everyone-else's tot. In larger ships like Carriers Messes were large (about 40 in my Mess on The Vic) and so this custom could be hazardous. In general, men were sensible and would barely touch a glass to their lips. But I knew of one case of a Cook dying of alcoholic poisoning and there were doubtless others, though few, I suspect. I wasn't present in his Mess so I don't know how he managed to take probably 25 standard drinks, but in a large Mess it was obviously possible. Of course, his size, age etc could have contributed to the tragedy.
If you were in a Mess with the SA(V)s (Stores Assistant (V)), who measured out the rum, he would sometimes cheat when the Officer of the Watch was off guard, and "spill" a bit more of the rum being poured into the fanny. This was known as "spillers" and meant we got a bit more than the strict ration. Also, sometimes (quite rarely) a man who didn't want the ration would still go G (and not T) so at sea the Mess would get a bit more rum.
Some years after I left the RN I was interested to learn of the concern of the NHS at the heavy incidence of schlerosis of the liver in ex-members of the RN!
 
Champagne surely. I don't recall it being being referred to as bubbly. Mind you I have never had any.
@dapperdunn is correct. Rum/grog was often referred to as bubbly by those partaking. I have no idea why. The mixing of the rum with water to make the grog did sometimes create a few bubbles but the finished article was never frothy or fizzy.
 
Ahem - Assuming you've all reached sandy bottoms this thread resumes with another FAA person:

Commodore Nick Harris, British naval officer who became a fighter-jet instructor at the US Navy’s elite TOPGUN school – obituary by DT of 23rd May '22

Praised as a 'superb aviator whose flying abilities are limitless', he joked that Tom Cruise's character in Top Gun was based on him.
1653508755502.png
Nick Harris aboard Bristol
Commodore Nick Harris, who has died aged 80, was a revered British instructor at the US Navy’s Fighter Weapons School, popularly known as TOPGUN. The school famously featured in Top Gun, the 1986 film that propelled Tom Cruise to superstardom, and Harris liked to joke that Cruise’s character had been based on him. In 1970 Harris was an instructor on the Royal Navy’s air warfare course, flying Sea Vixen II fighters at Lossiemouth, Scotland. There, after the tragic death of a colleague, he became the obvious choice to fill at short notice the appointment of exchange officer in the USN’s VF-121 squadron in Miramar, southern California.

Since 1966, the Fleet Air Arm had established a liaison with VF-121, the American squadron that became famous for its TOPGUN school, established in 1969.The school had been founded in response to the unsustainable losses, both of aircraft and crew, that the USN had been suffering in the Vietnam War, despite the technological superiority of its jets. Its aim was to drill pilots in air-to-air missile dogfights. As an instructor Harris, flying Phantom and Skyhawk jets, earned a phenomenal reputation, which his American commanding officer expressed in grateful hyperbole: “Lt Harris is a superb aviator whose flying abilities are limitless, his knowledge level and expertise are incomparable and his ability to impart this knowledge to others is exemplary.”

1653508495270.png
Harris in 1977 and his Phantom, specially painted for the Queen's Silver jubilee
Nicholas Richard Harris was born on September 24 1941 in Peacehaven, Sussex, but in 1949 his family emigrated to South Africa. He was educated at Bishops College, Cape Town, Krugersdorp high school and General Botha nautical college. At 16 he ran away to see the world in tramp steamers, and earned his second mate’s ticket, before joining the Royal Navy aged 22, determined to be a fighter pilot.
1653508559152.png
Harris receiving his wings
Harris first flew solo in a Tiger Moth over Roborough airfield, Plymouth in 1963, soon progressed to Provost and Hunter jet trainers and by 1965 to the de Havilland Sea Vixen, the Navy’s twin-engine, boom-tailed, two-seat fighter.

From 1965 to 1967 he flew the Sea Vixen FAW2 in 899 Naval Air Squadron from the fleet carrier Eagle, seeing service on the Beira Patrol – an operation intended to prevent oil reaching landlocked Rhodesia – and during the withdrawal from Aden. Harris’s talent as a pilot, and a safe pilot too, saw him serve with 766 NAS, the Navy’s all weather fighter school, as an instructor from 1967 to 1970, before his exchange service with the US school.

On his return to the UK, he took the staff course, on which he was top student, followed by a series of demanding appointments, obtaining his sea watch-keeping certificate – essential for any aviator wishing to progress on the general list – on the destroyer Devonshire in 1973, then working on the Sea Harrier desk in the MoD from 1974 to 1976.
1653508586649.png
Harris's 1977 Jubilee flypast over London
Promoted to commander in 1977, Harris was given command of 892 Naval Air Squadron, destined to fly Phantoms from the fleet carrier Ark Royal. On July 10 Harris celebrated the Queen’s jubilee with a flypast over London. The exaggerated perspective of a picture appeared to show him flying below the Post Office Tower; he accepted all blame, but the picture made good publicity for the Navy.

He was looking forward to leading his squadron on board Ark Royal when, in late July 1977, he had unexplained symptoms of hyperventilation and dizziness: no cause was found, but he was grounded. He had flown 1,970 hours in fixed wing aircraft and made 144 deck landings and 164 catapult launches by day and by night.

Subsequent service included second-in-command of the destroyer Bristol, which led a convoy of reinforcements to the Falklands in May 1982; naval attaché in Rome from 1987 to 1990, and head of Defence Medical Services Reorganisation from 1994 to 1997.

Harris was “mad about cars”. In his early 20s he wooed his wife, when she was still a sixth-former, in a French-built Facel Vega; his next car was an Aston Martin DB2, and his idea of a family car, after the birth of his first child, was a DB4. During the course of 19 domestic moves, the Harrises bought and renovated a number of derelict houses. In retirement he bought Anore, a 72ft sailing boat based in Florida, and then Moonbeam, based in the South of France.
He learned to ski late in life, and was a member of the MCC. As a child in Africa, he had loved sports, riding in the bush and keeping unusual pets (particularly snakes), and in old age in Gloucestershire, he enjoyed walking the countryside.
Harris was a showman: precise, self-disciplined, well-spoken and always immaculate in dress and demeanour.

He married Philippa Easten in 1966: they divorced in 2005, and his partner from 2006 was Juliet Carron. Two daughters and two sons survive him.

Commodore N R Harris, born September 24 1941, died April 18 2022

Edit to make date correction a la @Sumo
 
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Ahem - Assuming you've all reached sandy bottoms this thread resumes with another FAA person:

Commodore Nick Harris, British naval officer who became a fighter-jet instructor at the US Navy’s elite TOPGUN school – obituary by DT of 23rd May 1922

Praised as a 'superb aviator whose flying abilities are limitless', he joked that Tom Cruise's character in Top Gun was based on him.
View attachment 62785
Nick Harris aboard Bristol
Commodore Nick Harris, who has died aged 80, was a revered British instructor at the US Navy’s Fighter Weapons School, popularly known as TOPGUN. The school famously featured in Top Gun, the 1986 film that propelled Tom Cruise to superstardom, and Harris liked to joke that Cruise’s character had been based on him. In 1970 Harris was an instructor on the Royal Navy’s air warfare course, flying Sea Vixen II fighters at Lossiemouth, Scotland. There, after the tragic death of a colleague, he became the obvious choice to fill at short notice the appointment of exchange officer in the USN’s VF-121 squadron in Miramar, southern California.

Since 1966, the Fleet Air Arm had established a liaison with VF-121, the American squadron that became famous for its TOPGUN school, established in 1969.The school had been founded in response to the unsustainable losses, both of aircraft and crew, that the USN had been suffering in the Vietnam War, despite the technological superiority of its jets. Its aim was to drill pilots in air-to-air missile dogfights. As an instructor Harris, flying Phantom and Skyhawk jets, earned a phenomenal reputation, which his American commanding officer expressed in grateful hyperbole: “Lt Harris is a superb aviator whose flying abilities are limitless, his knowledge level and expertise are incomparable and his ability to impart this knowledge to others is exemplary.”

View attachment 62782
Harris in 1977 and his Phantom, specially painted for the Queen's Silver jubilee
Nicholas Richard Harris was born on September 24 1941 in Peacehaven, Sussex, but in 1949 his family emigrated to South Africa. He was educated at Bishops College, Cape Town, Krugersdorp high school and General Botha nautical college. At 16 he ran away to see the world in tramp steamers, and earned his second mate’s ticket, before joining the Royal Navy aged 22, determined to be a fighter pilot.
View attachment 62783
Harris receiving his wings
Harris first flew solo in a Tiger Moth over Roborough airfield, Plymouth in 1963, soon progressed to Provost and Hunter jet trainers and by 1965 to the de Havilland Sea Vixen, the Navy’s twin-engine, boom-tailed, two-seat fighter.

From 1965 to 1967 he flew the Sea Vixen FAW2 in 899 Naval Air Squadron from the fleet carrier Eagle, seeing service on the Beira Patrol – an operation intended to prevent oil reaching landlocked Rhodesia – and during the withdrawal from Aden. Harris’s talent as a pilot, and a safe pilot too, saw him serve with 766 NAS, the Navy’s all weather fighter school, as an instructor from 1967 to 1970, before his exchange service with the US school.

On his return to the UK, he took the staff course, on which he was top student, followed by a series of demanding appointments, obtaining his sea watch-keeping certificate – essential for any aviator wishing to progress on the general list – on the destroyer Devonshire in 1973, then working on the Sea Harrier desk in the MoD from 1974 to 1976.
View attachment 62784
Harris's 1977 Jubilee flypast over London
Promoted to commander in 1977, Harris was given command of 892 Naval Air Squadron, destined to fly Phantoms from the fleet carrier Ark Royal. On July 10 Harris celebrated the Queen’s jubilee with a flypast over London. The exaggerated perspective of a picture appeared to show him flying below the Post Office Tower; he accepted all blame, but the picture made good publicity for the Navy.

He was looking forward to leading his squadron on board Ark Royal when, in late July 1977, he had unexplained symptoms of hyperventilation and dizziness: no cause was found, but he was grounded. He had flown 1,970 hours in fixed wing aircraft and made 144 deck landings and 164 catapult launches by day and by night.

Subsequent service included second-in-command of the destroyer Bristol, which led a convoy of reinforcements to the Falklands in May 1982; naval attaché in Rome from 1987 to 1990, and head of Defence Medical Services Reorganisation from 1994 to 1997.

Harris was “mad about cars”. In his early 20s he wooed his wife, when she was still a sixth-former, in a French-built Facel Vega; his next car was an Aston Martin DB2, and his idea of a family car, after the birth of his first child, was a DB4. During the course of 19 domestic moves, the Harrises bought and renovated a number of derelict houses. In retirement he bought Anore, a 72ft sailing boat based in Florida, and then Moonbeam, based in the South of France.
He learned to ski late in life, and was a member of the MCC. As a child in Africa, he had loved sports, riding in the bush and keeping unusual pets (particularly snakes), and in old age in Gloucestershire, he enjoyed walking the countryside.
Harris was a showman: precise, self-disciplined, well-spoken and always immaculate in dress and demeanour.

He married Philippa Easten in 1966: they divorced in 2005, and his partner from 2006 was Juliet Carron. Two daughters and two sons survive him.

Commodore N R Harris, born September 24 1941, died April 18 2022
One has to assume the obituary date at the start was a typo.
 
Borrowed from Telegraph Obituaries 5 June 2022 • 8:18pm

Rear-Admiral Richard Cobbold, energetic and effective director of the Royal United Services Institute – obituary
He generated more income, recruited new staff and restored the RUSI’s reputation as a leading defence think tank
1655450120278.png
Richard Cobbold in command

Rear Admiral Richard Cobbold, who has died aged 79, survived being court-martialed for a collision in his ship in 1978 and, post Cold War, revitalised the Royal United Services Institute (RUSI) as its director from 1994 to 2007.

The RUSI, founded in 1831, is the world’s oldest defence and security think tank. But when Cobbold took over he found it moribund, dependent upon the Ministry of Defence for speakers, and with the bulk of its funds consumed by building maintenance. It had lost ground to newer more academically energetic organisations.

Cobbold was also frustrated by his trustees who had presided over the institute’s decline. Gradually, with new, more sympathetic trustees, he began to generate more income, some from overseas sources such as Singapore, Qatar, Taiwan and the UAE. Other funds came from industry, including BAe Systems, and more from conferences and the institute’s first-ever donors’ campaign.

With new funding Cobbold refreshed his research staff and widened their remit, splitting the studies section into two departments, military sciences and international security, and later adding a third – focused on homeland security.

He also oversaw the computerisation of its records, something regarded at that time as revolutionary.

He wrote numerous articles for the RUSI journal and other publications, contributed to the national and international media on defence and security issues, and wrote a regular column in a Japanese journal.

During the same period, he was also a specialist adviser to the House of Commons’ Defence and Foreign Affairs Committees, impressing MPs by his independence of mind, free of MoD prejudice. Academics found him unstuffy and easy to work with.

Reforming RUSI was a slow process, and at the end of his thirteen-year term as director he felt he had more to do. Nevertheless, he had laid the groundwork for his successors to reclaim the institute’s position as Britain’s leading defence think tank.
1655450185384.png
A youthful Richard Cobbold (left)
Richard Francis Cobbold was born on June 25 1942 in Dartmouth, where his father taught mathematics, and was educated at Bryanston school, Dorset. Among his ancestors were the poet and writer Elizabeth (née Knipe) Cobbold (1764–1824) and her son Richard (1797-1877) author of the History of Margaret Catchpole. The family name lived on in the Ipswich brewers Tolly Cobbold.

1655450302973.pngRichard Cobbold receiving the Queen's Gold Medal
Cobbold entered Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth in 1960 as a supply officer, coming top in the passing out examination and winning the Queen’s Gold Medal. In his first ship, however, he was so seasick that one of his father’s former pupils wrote to his parents querying whether a life at sea was the right choice. But Cobbold was so determined that, citing Nelson who had also suffered seasickness, he overcame all objections.

He had been selected to study Law at Cambridge to become one of the Navy’s barristers when, while serving ashore at the Royal Naval Air Station, Yeovilton, he realised that the young aviators around him did less work than he did, were paid more and had more fun.

Cobbold succeeded in transferring to the Fleet Air Arm as an observer [navigator]. In 1970-72 he served on loan to the Royal Australian Navy, formative years in which he made life-long friends, with one of whom, a keen amateur pilot, he flew a small plane around Australia.

He also developed a keen sense of fun and adventure and formed a team of runners to race overland against the Australian carrier Melbourne on her passage from Melbourne to Sidney, his runners arriving on the quay in time to take the carrier’s mooring lines.
1655450437906.png
Richard Cobbold, centre, with other aircrew
Cobbold served in several naval air squadrons until in 1977 he attended the Royal Naval Staff College and was promoted to commander.

From 1977 to 1979 he commanded the frigate Mohawk, but in 1978, while in Valletta harbour, Malta, she was caught in a strong gust of wind and crunched her bows on the steps under the Barrakka Lift. She was a single-screw ship, difficult to handle at slow speed and in a crowded harbour.
Told he was going to be court-martialed, “at least to find out what went wrong,” Cobbold, with his career at risk, replied: “I should like to know too!” The court established that, under the circumstances, the order to sail should have been delayed and Cobbold was given a reprimand (the lightest sentence).

From 1979 to 1983 he was a desk officer under the director of naval plans, then on the staff of the assistant director defence concepts, and in 1984 a student at the Royal College of Defence Studies, before returning to sea to command the frigate Brazen.
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Richard Cobbold meeting Sarah, Duchess of York, Diana, Princess of Wales, & Prince William

Prince Andrew was the flight commander, and a highlight of Cobbold’s command was a visit by the prince’s wife, Sarah, Duchess of York, his sister-in-law, Diana, Princess of Wales, and the three-year old Prince William.

Promoted to captain in 1987, Cobbold’s intellect was recognised by a return to the MoD as director of defence concepts. He became Captain 2nd Frigate Squadron in 1989 and commanded the frigate Brilliant, one of the first ships to carry women at sea.

His time with Brilliant was marked by tragedy when in May 1989 the ship’s helicopter crashed outside Mombasa, killing nine men who were on their way to holidays with their families. Cobbold’s humanity and leadership during this time, and that of his wife, Marika then and afterwards, was remarked upon and commended, but the tragedy continued to haunt him.

Cobbold was promoted to rear-admiral in 1991 and became Assistant Chief of Defence Staff (Operational Requirements) looking at the Navy’s future equipment needs and, after another reorganisation in the MoD in 1992, looking at joint service requirements.

A keen rugby player and cross-country runner in his youth, Cobbold played hockey and boxed for the Navy, and in his 50s he took up running again and completed several marathons. He also enjoyed theatre, ballet, opera and musicals, and delighted in quoting from books and poems.

He had met the teenage Marika Hjörne, scion of a Gothenburg press family, when the helicopter cruiser Blake visited Sweden in 1974. They married a year later but divorced in 1995, by which time Marika had become an award-winning author. They had a son and a daughter.

Rear-Admiral Richard Cobbold, born June 25 1942, died April 24 2022

 
By Telegraph Obituaries 28 July 2022 • 4:53pm

Captain Tony Casdagli, naval helicopter pilot and ship’s captain who held firm during the Cod Wars – obituary

He was a calm and relaxed aviator and a highly respected leader, and once performed helicopter aerobatics disguised as a ‘granny’
1661228720683.png
Captain Tony Casdagli, who has died aged 90, was a charismatic naval aviator and ship’s captain whose career took an unexpected turn.

Anthony Casdagli was born in Manchester on June 12 1932 into an Anglo-Greek family of cotton traders. His early childhood was spent in Cairo, where the family firm had sent his father, but they returned to UK at the outbreak of the war.

His father, Major Alexis Casdagli, was captured in Crete in 1941 and spent the rest of the war a prisoner. Casdagli told his father’s remarkable story linking the grim realities of four years’ captivity in Germany with the solace his father found in stitching, which he started after being handed a piece of canvas and pinching red and blue wool from the disintegrating pullover of an elderly Cretan general. One of Alexis Casdagli’s first samplers contained a message in Morse hidden in the border, which became the subtitle of a book: A Stitch in Time: God Save the King – F--- Hitler! (2011).

Tony was educated at Ludgrove prep, where he excelled at all games, especially cricket, before joining Dartmouth. He had earned his wings after flying training at Pensacola, Florida, and was awaiting appointment to a front-line squadron when he crashed his car. After many months of surgery, as part of his rehabilitation he was sent to the commando carrier Bulwark.

Midshipman Ben Bathurst (a future First Sea Lord) recalled: “For someone whose legs and hips had suffered so badly the logic of requiring him to stand for four hours at a time on watchkeeping duties escapes me, but I shall always remember what sparkling cheerful company he was even in the coldest middle of the darkest middle [midnight to 0400] watch.”

The legend of “the limping Greek” was born: he was proud of his ethnicity and acquiesced to the epithet.

1661228832874.png
A handstitched letter to Tony Casdagli from his father Alexis

Casdagli converted to helicopter pilot, quickly becoming an instructor in 705 Naval Air Squadron, where he proved himself a calm and relaxed aviator; others regarded themselves fortunate to be one of his students. At an air day at Culdrose, Cornwall, it was announced that a draw for a flight in a two-seat Hiller helicopter had been won by an elderly lady.

A figure in a dress and immense hat came forward and was strapped into the right-hand seat by the pilot but as he was walking round the front of the aircraft to get into the left-hand seat, the aircraft leapt into the sky, the pilot flung himself on to the ground and, with “granny” at the helm, the helicopter gave a dazzling aerobatic display. Once landed, “granny” disappeared in an ambulance – the crowd none the wiser that it had been Casdagli at the controls.

He next commanded the ship’s flight in the destroyer Kent, before commanding first 705 Squadron, then 820 Squadron, flying Wessex anti-submarine helicopters in the fleet carrier Eagle. Eagle covered the withdrawal from Aden in 1967, before deploying to the Far East and visiting Hong Kong and Australia.

Most of the pilots were on their first tour but, Bathurst recalled, “It was our wonderful luck to have Tony as the boss. He led from the front in a calm unhurried way, always fair, balanced, and never lost his temper, though on many occasions it would have been entirely justified, but with his understanding of the young and his obvious professionalism, they all adored him and found a sympathetic ear. It was a privilege to serve under Tony and I look back on my time in 820 as one of the happiest and most rewarding of my career – entirely due to his example and leadership.”

Casdagli ditched twice at sea. First, on the night of February 27 1964 at 400ft over Falmouth Bay, his Wessex suffered heavy tail-rotor vibration: Casdagli ordered the cabin crew to jump into the sea while he strained to hold his helicopter in a low hover, before crashing and sinking. He and his co-pilot climbed free and swam to a boat launched by the minesweeper Brinton.

Then on August 18 1967 in the Indian Ocean, Casdagli’s Wessex lost power, but he gently landed on the surface of the sea, and the aircraft’s flotation equipment kept it buoyant long enough to be recovered by Eagle’s crane.

Promoted early to commander in 1971, he was sent to the Gulf to command the minehunter Wiston and the 9th Mine Countermeasures Squadron. Showing intelligent leadership of the highest quality, he soon won the respect of his lieutenants in command, most of whom were talented and precocious; he showed a quick eye for detail and asked for exacting standards as he guided them in their first commands.

In early 1976 Casdagli commanded the frigate Naiad on several patrols during the Cod Wars, when government policy changed, intending to avoid damage to ships. In April Casdagli reported that the Icelandic Tyr , in foul weather and low visibility, had repeatedly manoeuvred to within feet of him, and that by the new rules of engagement he was powerless to prevent warp-cutting (the cutting of nets).

1661229122537.png
Casdagli's Wessex is lifted from the Indian Ocean on to the Eagle in 1967 after he had landed it safely on to the surface of the sea when it lost power

The policy was equally frustrating to the Navy – who had previously had the power, if authorised, to stop Icelandic gunboats from cutting trawlers’ nets – and the fishermen, who began to suspect, rightly, that the frigates had new orders. Then on April 23, Casdagli placed Naiad close on the port quarter of the trawler Irvana, when Tyr took an ill-judged risk and attempted to cut between the two ships.

In the inevitable collision, Tyr’s superstructure was bent, and Naiad’s bow was split below the waterline, but after some hours of damage control she remained on patrol – and, indeed, after more dockyard repairs, she completed a further patrol at the end of May.

In 1978-79 as deputy director Naval Air Warfare, Casdagli oversaw the Fleet Air Arm’s future aircraft programmes, including the Sea Harrier, which was on the verge of introduction to service and which would prove a war-winner in the Falklands.

In 1980-81 he commanded the destroyer Bristol, and his last uniformed appointment was as chief of staff to Flag Officer Naval Air Command, where he helped to generate the forces needed for the war in the South Atlantic. He retired in 1983 with a particularly well-earned CBE.

1661229224930.png
Casdagli on the bridge

Casdagli had the versatility and utility of many naval officers of his age, and his career went in a new direction. He spent the next 15 years in the baking trade as the director of the Federation of Bakers, their trade association, which he led through a period of great change. He found himself negotiating with unions, lobbying on technical and regulatory issues at national and European levels, including below-cost selling and the growing power of the supermarkets. He supplied a calm, wise head and was someone the bakers could talk to with the utmost confidence and confidentiality; each departing chairman of the federation was given a personalised, hand-stitched sampler by Casdagli, who had acquired the skill from his father.

In retirement, he spent his days as president of the Aero Golfing Society, and continued stitching. His garden in Highgate was a picture, and he was a keen cook*.

Tony Casdagli married Dell Gibbons in 1957; they divorced in 1982, and the same year he married Sally Murray, who survives him with two daughters and three sons of the first marriage.

Tony Casdagli, born June 12 1932, died June 16 2022

===============================

Wow - *Helo Pilot AND a Cook. (traditionally it's usually the other way round, :cool: )

=====================================


From his Interview by Patrick Barkham @patrick_barkham Sat 3 Sep 2011

1661230419261.png
ref: https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2011/sep/03/tony-casdagli-father-stitching-nazis
===================

EDIT to include DT Obit Link = https://www.telegraph.co.uk/obituar...gli-naval-helicopter-pilot-ships-captain-who/
 
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Basically he was on POLC, RIP to the guy and condolences to the family but doing POLC at 53!, you don't have to do the run when you're past 40 especially if you have a known heart condition, something doesn't add up, to me anyway.
The mile and half runs were stopped sometime in the 70's or 80's after a CPO died of heart failure. As @WreckerL says, something doesn't add up.
RIP
 

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