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Naval Related Obituaries

@janner was he a Weymouth SOCA member?
@Sumo, & for the record, SOCA {formerly the S/M Old Comrades Assocn.) was re-named & re-badged as the Submariners Association a few years ago*:

1615962482919.png

See https://www.submarinersassociation.co.uk/home



*4/05/1999. See also this snippet from The B-in-F Branch:

<<...In May 1997 the Branch first heard of the proposal to change the name of the organisation from the Submarine Old Comrades' Association, and some considerable concern was expressed. About the same time there was the first news of the Centenary of the Submarine Service in both Barrow and nationally; there was great enthusiasm for this and a Barrow Committee was formed!

Another overseas visit took place in late 1998 when several members and wives visited the Vancouver and Toronto Branches. In March 1999 a visit to the Tasmania Branch was mooted and in April 2000, three members and their wives visited Australia.

After all the discussions and concerns raised and argued locally and nationally the proposed name change from the Submarine Old Comrades' Association to the Submariners' Association took place, and the first Branch meeting under the new name took place on 4th May 1999. At this time Branch member, John Houlding, was the National Secretary and travelled to many branches nationwide to explain the reasons behind the change from the SOCA to the SA. During 1999 and 2000 planning for the Barrow Submarine Centenary celebrations continued in earnest with more and more branches and local organisations promising support...>>

See http://rnsubs.co.uk/association/branch-history.html
 
@Sumo, & for the record, SOCA {formerly the S/M Old Comrades Assocn.) was re-named & re-badged as the Submariners Association a few years ago*:

View attachment 57478

See https://www.submarinersassociation.co.uk/home



*4/05/1999. See also this snippet from The B-in-F Branch:

<<...In May 1997 the Branch first heard of the proposal to change the name of the organisation from the Submarine Old Comrades' Association, and some considerable concern was expressed. About the same time there was the first news of the Centenary of the Submarine Service in both Barrow and nationally; there was great enthusiasm for this and a Barrow Committee was formed!

Another overseas visit took place in late 1998 when several members and wives visited the Vancouver and Toronto Branches. In March 1999 a visit to the Tasmania Branch was mooted and in April 2000, three members and their wives visited Australia.

After all the discussions and concerns raised and argued locally and nationally the proposed name change from the Submarine Old Comrades' Association to the Submariners' Association took place, and the first Branch meeting under the new name took place on 4th May 1999. At this time Branch member, John Houlding, was the National Secretary and travelled to many branches nationwide to explain the reasons behind the change from the SOCA to the SA. During 1999 and 2000 planning for the Barrow Submarine Centenary celebrations continued in earnest with more and more branches and local organisations promising support...>>

See http://rnsubs.co.uk/association/branch-history.html
I am sure it was still SOCA (submarine pissing up squad) when I was a member in Weymuff in 2003/2004.
Also remember when SOCA weekend was on at Dolphin, loads of Duty weekenders, trying to get off that week end? Me not knowing what was coming, as I was coming over from Skimmers as a PO, volunteered as Duty PO, it was an interesting weekend.
 
@Sumo I joined the branch around 2001 and it was certainly SA then, (some of the older members still called it SOCA). I think around 2002 James Perone was the guest of honour at the dinner when he suggested that a Memorial should be considered for those that lost their lives in the Sidon. Memorial was unveiled 16 June 2005 (50th anniversary)
 
@Sumo I joined the branch around 2001 and it was certainly SA then, (some of the older members still called it SOCA). I think around 2002 James Perone was the guest of honour at the dinner when he suggested that a Memorial should be considered for those that lost their lives in the Sidon. Memorial was unveiled 16 June 2005 (50th anniversary)
I think I mentioned before when David H passed his planning permission submission around, I mentioned all his measurements were in cm and not M, very small monument that would have been. Then the saga in the office that the stone mason instructor at weymuff college, who was going to work the stone, had been sacked and the stone donated from a Portland quarry for the memorial had been cut up by the college for other use? Challenge for David but he got the college to resupply stone.
Also sure my member ship card, small blue card said SOCA, but that was a long time ago, using old stock?
 

Warrant Officer Diver Terry Settle, expert in mine clearance – obituary​

Lauded for his coolness under pressure, he carried out lifesaving work across the globe, from the Gulf of Suez to the Mediterranean

ByTelegraph Obituaries31 March 2021 • 6:11pm

Terry Settle with his family outside Buckingham Palace: during his career he was appointed MBE and was awarded the British Empire Medal and the Queen’s Medal for Gallantry

Terry Settle with his family outside Buckingham Palace: during his career he was appointed MBE and was awarded the British Empire Medal and the Queen’s Medal for Gallantry
Warrant Officer Diver Terry Settle, who has died aged 76, was one of Britain’s most highly decorated postwar clearance divers.
In September 1984 Settle led a team of divers, part of an international effort known as Operation Harling, to investigate after a score of ships were mysteriously damaged by mines thought to have been laid by the Libyan ruler Muammar Gaddafi in the Gulf of Suez.
There, the minehunter Gavinton found a strange object in 23 fathoms at the exit of the Suez Canal. Despite poor underwater visibility, Settle carefully photographed and measured the mine-like object, which was clean but half-buried, nose-down in mud.
Using airbags Settle, aware that any fuse might contain a hydrostat, towed the mine into shallower water. Surmising that this was a new type of Soviet mine, and after borrowing the correct-sized Soviet spanner from the Egyptian navy, Settle succeeded in disassembling the detonator and primer and steaming out 600 kg of explosive.
Settle with his MBE

Settle with his MBE
For his remarkable courage, dedication and professionalism shown over several days, Settle was awarded the Queen’s Medal for Gallantry.
The following year, in February in the Persian Gulf, the supertanker Fellowship L was hit by an Iraqi air-launched, French-supplied, Exocet missile, which failed to explode. Asked if he could be ready in three weeks to investigate, Settle answered, “Twelve hours max”, and he and his team flew by commercial airliner to Dubai.
The missile had hit six feet above the waterline in the forward tank, which contained 25,000 tons of crude oil. The manufacturers declined to share the render-safe procedure, so, after the oil had been pumped out, Settle deduced from first principles how best to deal with the missile, which lay, with its warhead and some of its fuel still intact, 100 feet down at the bottom of the tank.
In the heat and fumes, he had the Exocet lifted on to the deck and put his know-how to work: asked by an assistant: “What happens if it blows up?” he replied: “Don’t worry, you and I won’t know about it”. Eventually the remains of the Exocet were taken out into deep water and dumped.
With Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex

With Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex
That same year, Settle’s Fleet Clearance Diving Team was sent to Malta to clear Grand Harbour of wartime ordnance. British forces had been banished from the island by the prime minister Dom Mintoff but, working incognito, Settle and his divers removed tons of small arms, munitions and bombs, and cut up wrecks on the seabed despite thick mud, zero visibility, numerous seabed obstructions and the constant danger of unexploded ordnance.
During an operation to remove four live torpedoes, Settle closed the harbour, something that not even the Germans had managed in wartime. Mintoff became a regular visitor to view Settle’s progress.
Settle was appointed MBE.
Terence Settle was born on February 2 1945 in Epping, Essex, where his mother had been evacuated from Tottenham: his father was a naval diver who had helped clear the Suez Canal in 1942/43 and was subsequently cox’un of Landing Ship Tank 421 at Sicily, Salerno, Anzio and Normandy. Young Settle was educated at Chase Lane primary and Sidney Burnell secondary modern but “was only ever going to join the Navy”.
At the Vernon Monument in Portsmouth which honours those involved in mine warfare, diving, and bomb and mine disposal

At the Vernon Monument in Portsmouth which honours those involved in mine warfare, diving, and bomb and mine disposal
He joined as a Boy Seaman in 1960. A car accident in Hong Kong threatened to end his career, but he recovered and took part in the Konfrontasi in the frigate Berwick, and in the withdrawal from Aden in the frigate Ajax.
In a 25-year career as diver, besides his awards for major explosive ordnance disposal, Settle was three times awarded the Commander-in-Chief’s commendations for his bravery and expertise, and in 1980 the BEM.
Before retiring from the Navy in 1995, Settle was an instructor at the Defence Explosive Ordnance Disposal School, and served six months on loan service with the Qatari Defence Forces. He founded Settle For Safety, a health and safety consultancy, and supported the Vernon Monument, recently installed at Gunwharf Quays, Portsmouth, honouring those involved in mine warfare, diving, and bomb and mine disposal.
He is remembered equally for his cool head as for his inspirational leadership.
In 1973 Settle married Margaret “Mags” Ainslie Clark, who survives him with their two sons.
Terry Settle, born February 2 1945, died March 2 2021
 

Dick Hastilow, commanded Invincible in the Adriatic providing vital air support during the Bosnian War – obituary​

While on fishery protection duties in UK waters Hastilow brought his diplomatic skills to a tense negotiation with a Russian trawler

ByTelegraph Obituaries22 February 2022 • 5:08pm

Hastilow on the bridge of HMS Bristol

Hastilow on the bridge of the destroyer HMS Bristol
Captain Dick Hastilow, who has died aged 76, commanded four ships during his long and distinguished career, the last of which was the aircraft carrier Invincible.
On August 24 1994 she sailed for a tour of duty in the Adriatic as senior British ship in the area tasked with providing support for the British forces serving in the Former Republic of Yugoslavia with the United Nations Protection Force, Unprofor. The ship and its air squadrons had to be ready for action at any time, day or night, and this meant remaining in a limited area with little shore leave or relaxation.
Hastilow kept his men sharp and motivated during a difficult period, arranging exchange visits with other warships, Army units in Bosnia and US naval units. When short breaks were possible, visits were arranged to places of interest and he sent volunteer sailors ashore to repair a shell-damaged school at Bugojno, near Gornji Vakuf.
The French and American navies shared replenishment activities with British tankers, but political considerations prevented an exact matching of carrier operations and Hastilow had to use his diplomatic skills to liaise with their commanding officers to produce the best results.
Air support was an essential element of Allied operations, enforcing a no-fly zone over the former Yugoslavia both to enforce UN sanctions and to cover Unprofor re-supply and medical evacuation missions by helicopter. RN Sea Harriers operated closer to the men on the ground than Nato fighters based in Italy and could offer air interception, close air support and reconnaissance capabilities within a single sortie.
Soon after Invincible’s arrival, two Sea Harriers came under fire from surface-to-air missiles over the town of Bihac on the border of Bosnia and Croatia. Invincible and her two sister ships took turns to operate in the Adriatic between January 1993 and March 1996 and, although none had more than eight Sea Harriers embarked at any one time, they flew a significant percentage of all the British fast-jet missions over the former Yugoslavia.
When VIPs visited his ship, Hastilow showed them how well his team performed their difficult task and this left a deep impression on politicians who saw at first hand the important work they did.

his other commands included the Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth
Richard Geoffrey Hastilow was born on May 27 1945 in Liphook, Hampshire, to Geoffrey Hastilow, a civil servant, and Phyllis (née Blower). He was educated at Portsmouth Grammar School before entering the Britannia Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, as a Murray Scheme Cadet in 1963.
His early appointments were in ships stationed in various parts of the world, but in 1976 he demonstrated his qualities of diplomacy and the leadership that had created a ship’s company capable of achieving positive results in a difficult situation. Recently promoted to Lieutenant Commander, he was in command of the mine countermeasures vessel Soberton on fishery protection duties in UK territorial waters when a Russian trawler was detected fishing near the Scilly Islands.
Hastilow persuaded him to stop and sent an unarmed boarding party of three men on board; 16 hours of tense negotiation followed. While this was progressing, a Russian seaman in another trawler was injured and Hastilow organised a helicopter to pick him up.
Unfortunately the man died, but this act of goodwill, with firm but professional pressure, led to the Russian captain to agree to his ship being taken into Plymouth, where he was prosecuted. He pleaded guilty and blamed faulty radar equipment for his position error.

Prior to Soberton, Hastilow qualified on the first Principal Warfare Officers’ course, and after further service at sea he completed the RN Staff Course and trained ships’ warfare teams. After promotion to Commander in 1979 he attended the US Naval War College before joining the Defence Policy Staff in Whitehall in 1982.
In 1984 he was appointed to his second command, the destroyer Manchester, in which he circumnavigated the world. Promoted to Captain in 1986 he led the Navy’s officer recruiting team for two years and then became Captain of the RN Presentation Team, an appointment that involved speaking to public audiences around the UK on naval matters.
He was appointed to his third command, the destroyer Bristol, which was training Dartmouth Cadets, in 1990, and was then in command of BRNC, Dartmouth, in 1991. Throughout this period he was strongly in favour of women serving at sea on an equal footing with their male colleagues.
Invincible was his last appointment; in 1995 he left the Navy and was appointed CBE
 
Courtesy of Telegraph Obituaries 5 January 2021 • 5:18pm

Rear-Admiral Robin Musson, naval logistician who won seagoers relief from the poll tax – obituary

The deal he struck with Fife’s community charge registration officer was applied in both Scotland and England

View attachment 56302
Robin Musson - 'Proof that you don't have to be a bastard to get on’

Rear-Admiral Robin Musson,who has died aged 81, won relief for seagoers from the payment of the poll tax, and later became head of his profession.

As captain of HMS Cochrane, 1988–90, the naval shore establishment at Rosyth, Musson was also flag captain to the Flag Officer Scotland and Northern Ireland, Vice-Admiral Sir Jock Slater. At their first meeting, Slater told Musson to focus on the unwelcome proposal that seagoers based in Scotland were expected to pay a proposed poll tax even when at sea.

Musson decided to invite Fife’s community charge registration officer to lunch. He had been warned that the man was a communist, but for that reason Musson thought he was just the man to sympathise with the sailors’ lot. When Musson explained the issue, the man exclaimed: “It’s my responsibility to decide who pays, not those b------s in London!”

Over the lunch table a rough formula was established to exempt seagoers from the burden of the new tax, and when Musson pointed out that his guest’s jurisdiction only applied to Fife, the man “warmly” responded that other CCROs in Scotland had all worked for him and would follow his lead. The deal struck irritated officials in London, but it would also be applied when the poll tax was extended to England.

John Geoffrey Robin Musson was born on May 30 1939 in Horncastle, Lincolnshire, the son of a high-street banker, and educated at Luton Grammar School. Aged six his reading primer was Stevenson’s Treasure Island, which also sowed the seed for a naval career. His first experience of leadership, however, came as a Queen’s Scout when he was patrol leader of the Bedfordshire contingent to the 8th World Jamboree at Niagara Falls in 1956.

Musson joined Dartmouth in 1957 and specialised as a logistician (formerly the Supply and Secretariat Branch).

In 1961, in the commando carrier Bulwark during a deployment in the Far East, when Kuwait was threatened, Musson took part in Operation Vantage, a British military operation to protect the oil-rich state from its neighbour, Iraq.

Later that year, Musson and two companions, instead of taking the troop flight home, drove overland from Singapore to Penang but, unable to obtain Burmese visas, shipped their Land Rover on a Dutch cargo ship bound for Calcutta. They then drove up the Ganges valley into Pakistan and down the Indus valley to Quetta.

Avoiding Afghanistan, again for lack of visas, they drove on through Baluchistan, Iran, Turkey, Bulgaria, Yugoslavia and home. After six trouble-free weeks (except for a couple of broken springs), a personal triumph for Musson was his successful submission for travelling expenses.

In 1963-64 Musson was appointed to HMS Jufair, the shore base in Bahrain, where a British amphibious warfare squadron and a frigate kept the peace in the Gulf. Subsequent sea appointments to the destroyer Cavalier, the submarine depot ship Forth and the guided-missile destroyer Kent were followed by several staff appointments ashore, where his skill and knowledge of personnel, administration and logistics were put to best use.

Promoted rear-admiral, Musson was the senior naval directing staff at the Royal College of Defence Studies (1990–93), and Chief Naval Supply and Secretariat Officer (1991–93). He was appointed CB in 1993.

In retirement Musson sat on the board of the Royal Naval Benevolent Trust, was a governor of the Royal Hospital School, Holbrook, and secretary of the Salisbury Diocese Sudan Link.

Musson was handsome but never flamboyant, and possessed a universal reputation for kindness, generosity and fair-mindedness

proof, as one admirer put it, “that you don’t have to be a bastard to get on”.

In 1965 Musson married Joanna Ward, who survives him with their two sons and a daughter.

Rear-Admiral Robin Musson, born May 30 1939, died November 23 2020

======================================================

RIP to a particularly benevolent leader of the White Mafia Clan.
I was deeply sorry to learn of the decease of Rear Admiral Musson. I served under him as a Leading Writer when he was a young Lieutenant acting as Captain's Secretary under Captain J S Launders on HMS Forth in 1968. I would like to pay a belated tribute to a thoroughly decent man, apart from his many fine attributes touched upon in this obituary (I have only now seen it).
As a young man, 22 years old at the time and 6 years younger than he was, Lieutenant Musson impressed me as both a kind and fair-minded man who was clearly an officer in the very best of the traditions of the RN. On one occasion he instructed me to write a brief report of my grievance against a notorious CPO Writer on HMS Forth with a penchant for having men charged on frivolous and sometimes quite spurious "offences", often just as we called into a port after weeks at sea. I had requested to be removed to a role which distanced me from this man. Though I stuck to the facts in my report, I had perhaps taken some literary licence in my expression of the grounds for my request and when Lieutenant Musson had read my report he summoned me to his office. There he told me that my report was "thoroughly scurrilous and insubordinate" and that he was going to tear it up and forget he had read it. His no doubt justified rebuke gave me not the slightest dissatisfaction: he had the gift, quite rare in my experience, of exercising his authority in a manner which elicited respect rather than offence.
I experienced this on more than one occasion, sometimes with mild humour, as on an occasion when on the bridge at action stations in the Indian Ocean. We were required to wear protective gear and I had opted out of wearing the headgear. Lieutenant Musson was also on the bridge, naturally in full protective gear. When he saw me he said to me "Southern, if I have to look like a blood "nana" so have you, so put your headgear on!".
But he was a man of authentic humility. In the evenings I would retreat to the office I worked in, across the passage from his, to quietly read away from the noise of the Mess. Lieutenant Musson would often be sat in his office working and possibly relaxing away from the wardroom. As a bibliophile, I kept some books on a shelf in the office I worked in, and he would occasionally enter the office to borrow a book and ask me what I recommended. Beyond that, though very occasionally, while drafting a letter he would ask me if I could suggest an appropriate synonym for a word or similar. He was obviously a highly intelligent man and I later learnt that, like myself, he had had a grammar school education. So I was much impressed by his humility.
In August 1969, on my last day serving on HMS Forth, before returning home for discharge from the Navy, Lieutenant Musson told me that he would like me to join him and Commander Chambers, the Squadron Supply Officer, in the latters cabin for a farewell drink.
Though in the years which followed I often wondered what had become of Lieutenant Musson and another fine officer, Lieutenant Harry Edward Sharpe, who had been my Divisional Officer on my first ship, HMS Victorious, and who had introduced me to the treasures of Greek and Roman philosophy, I had no way of readily discovering their journeys. This was before the days of internet. Very many years later I was delighted to learn that Lieutenant Musson has achieved the rank of a Flag Officer. I was perhaps even more pleased to learn that he was Warden in his local Anglican Church. It all seemed to come together, so fittingly, justifying, if it required justifying, the esteem in which I had held him as a young man.
I was also happy to learn at the same time that their the marriage of their eldest son, Matthew, had been announced. I had met Matthew on HMS Forth on an open day when he about three or four years old and had entertained him in my office making little paper ships. I met Mrs Musson only once, as I was walking across the causeway separating Singapore during the monsoons and Lieutenant and Mrs Musson stopped and gave me a lift.
A couple of days before I left HMS Forth I found myself typing Lieutenant Musson's Trade Certificate, with comments perhaps more generous than I deserved, for signature by Captain Launders. I never had occasion to show it to anyone. But his comments encouraged me greatly to complete the distance tertiary studies I had commenced, being awarded to international prizes on completion in 1972 and a successful career in risk management in Australia.
I don't know if anyone will ever read my little tribute but I would like to think that perhaps his family might somehow come across it and that it may bear witness to the truth that men and women of great ability and talent in their worldly duties can also be persons of great character, revealed in the smallest events of life.
May you rest in peace Rear Admiral JGR Musson.
 
An inspiring personal tribute, and none the worse for being written in retrospect. I hope very much that Matthew, and other members of the Musson family will both see and appreciate it.

Curiously enough, I not only had the pleasure of knowing Rob Musson but also that of Lieutenant Commander Harry Sharp BEM.

Jack
 
I was deeply sorry to learn of the decease of Rear Admiral Musson. I served under him as a Leading Writer when he was a young Lieutenant acting as Captain's Secretary under Captain J S Launders on HMS Forth in 1968. I would like to pay a belated tribute to a thoroughly decent man, apart from his many fine attributes touched upon in this obituary (I have only now seen it).
As a young man, 22 years old at the time and 6 years younger than he was, Lieutenant Musson impressed me as both a kind and fair-minded man who was clearly an officer in the very best of the traditions of the RN. On one occasion he instructed me to write a brief report of my grievance against a notorious CPO Writer on HMS Forth with a penchant for having men charged on frivolous and sometimes quite spurious "offences", often just as we called into a port after weeks at sea. I had requested to be removed to a role which distanced me from this man. Though I stuck to the facts in my report, I had perhaps taken some literary licence in my expression of the grounds for my request and when Lieutenant Musson had read my report he summoned me to his office. There he told me that my report was "thoroughly scurrilous and insubordinate" and that he was going to tear it up and forget he had read it. His no doubt justified rebuke gave me not the slightest dissatisfaction: he had the gift, quite rare in my experience, of exercising his authority in a manner which elicited respect rather than offence.
I experienced this on more than one occasion, sometimes with mild humour, as on an occasion when on the bridge at action stations in the Indian Ocean. We were required to wear protective gear and I had opted out of wearing the headgear. Lieutenant Musson was also on the bridge, naturally in full protective gear. When he saw me he said to me "Southern, if I have to look like a blood "nana" so have you, so put your headgear on!".
But he was a man of authentic humility. In the evenings I would retreat to the office I worked in, across the passage from his, to quietly read away from the noise of the Mess. Lieutenant Musson would often be sat in his office working and possibly relaxing away from the wardroom. As a bibliophile, I kept some books on a shelf in the office I worked in, and he would occasionally enter the office to borrow a book and ask me what I recommended. Beyond that, though very occasionally, while drafting a letter he would ask me if I could suggest an appropriate synonym for a word or similar. He was obviously a highly intelligent man and I later learnt that, like myself, he had had a grammar school education. So I was much impressed by his humility.
In August 1969, on my last day serving on HMS Forth, before returning home for discharge from the Navy, Lieutenant Musson told me that he would like me to join him and Commander Chambers, the Squadron Supply Officer, in the latters cabin for a farewell drink.
Though in the years which followed I often wondered what had become of Lieutenant Musson and another fine officer, Lieutenant Harry Edward Sharpe, who had been my Divisional Officer on my first ship, HMS Victorious, and who had introduced me to the treasures of Greek and Roman philosophy, I had no way of readily discovering their journeys. This was before the days of internet. Very many years later I was delighted to learn that Lieutenant Musson has achieved the rank of a Flag Officer. I was perhaps even more pleased to learn that he was Warden in his local Anglican Church. It all seemed to come together, so fittingly, justifying, if it required justifying, the esteem in which I had held him as a young man.
I was also happy to learn at the same time that their the marriage of their eldest son, Matthew, had been announced. I had met Matthew on HMS Forth on an open day when he about three or four years old and had entertained him in my office making little paper ships. I met Mrs Musson only once, as I was walking across the causeway separating Singapore during the monsoons and Lieutenant and Mrs Musson stopped and gave me a lift.
A couple of days before I left HMS Forth I found myself typing Lieutenant Musson's Trade Certificate, with comments perhaps more generous than I deserved, for signature by Captain Launders. I never had occasion to show it to anyone. But his comments encouraged me greatly to complete the distance tertiary studies I had commenced, being awarded to international prizes on completion in 1972 and a successful career in risk management in Australia.
I don't know if anyone will ever read my little tribute but I would like to think that perhaps his family might somehow come across it and that it may bear witness to the truth that men and women of great ability and talent in their worldly duties can also be persons of great character, revealed in the smallest events of life.
May you rest in peace Rear Admiral JGR Musson.
 
Thanks Jack. I had the privilege of serving under Lieutenant Harry Sharpe (as he was at that time) in 1963/64 on HMS Victorious. He was indeed a fine man and in the short time I knew him he had a profound influence on the direction my life was to take. I still have and treasure some of his books which he gave me, including The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius and The Last Days of Socrates.
I guess he was a Lieutenant Commander at the time you knew him. I have tried over the years to "track him down" but I think he was about 51 years old when I knew him, so little point trying now, though I would like to know his story beyond 63/64. I do recall that he was an SD Officer which may have accounted for his down-to-earth manner.
Gordon
 
Thanks Jack. I had the privilege of serving under Lieutenant Harry Sharpe (as he was at that time) in 1963/64 on HMS Victorious. He was indeed a fine man and in the short time I knew him he had a profound influence on the direction my life was to take. I still have and treasure some of his books which he gave me, including The Meditations of Marcus Aurelius and The Last Days of Socrates.
I guess he was a Lieutenant Commander at the time you knew him. I have tried over the years to "track him down" but I think he was about 51 years old when I knew him, so little point trying now, though I would like to know his story beyond 63/64. I do recall that he was an SD Officer which may have accounted for his down-to-earth manner.
Gordon
 
His name was Harold Edward Sharp BEM He retired in 1970 and sadly died 3/6/1989 He enjoyed nearly 20 years retirement.
 

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