NAVAL AIRMAN - SUB SPECIALISATIONS

Felt duty bound to contribute to this subject. As a POSE I have to defend the most respected of the Naval Airman branch, AH. Afterall they have always had the highes NAMET entry requirement for the FAA. Isnt their training some of the most grueling and respected in the service? Sorry you're right I must be intoxicated. When a rating fails in ANY other of the Aiman specialisations they ARE offered the last resort, AH!

I have known lots of AH's during my 18 years service and to a man they are all great lads, but switched on they are not! Remember your place please and trust me its very low down.
 
Downunder said:
Felt duty bound to contribute to this subject. As a POSE I have to defend the most respected of the Naval Airman branch, AH. Afterall they have always had the highes NAMET entry requirement for the FAA. Isnt their training some of the most grueling and respected in the service? Sorry you're right I must be intoxicated. When a rating fails in ANY other of the Aiman specialisations they ARE offered the last resort, AH!

I have known lots of AH's during my 18 years service and to a man they are all great lads, but switched on they are not! Remember your place please and trust me its very low down.
You're not suggesting they're?--- How can I put this-- Thick -Intellectually lacking--A bit short of the old grey matter? Surely not. What do you mean when you suggest they are " not switched on" A euphemismm they will be familiar with?
 
Downunder said:
Felt duty bound to contribute to this subject. As a POSE I have to defend the most respected of the Naval Airman branch, AH. Afterall they have always had the highes NAMET entry requirement for the FAA. Isnt their training some of the most grueling and respected in the service? Sorry you're right I must be intoxicated. When a rating fails in ANY other of the Aiman specialisations they ARE offered the last resort, AH!

I have known lots of AH's during my 18 years service and to a man they are all great lads, but switched on they are not! Remember your place please and trust me its very low down.
Aircraft Handlers - the bravest of the brave. Dip down in Naval Airman training and you end up as an addendum to the AE specialisation - namely SE! Stick to your sewing machine Down Under - you can always get a job with K P Lau or Billy Bernard when you leave the service.
 
slim said:
mickthetaff said:
As an ex-phot from 35 years ago, I feel I must defend my old branch. As is normal, all trades think that their trade is the best and most essential, and in most cases they are essential, but of course all are essential to the running of a ship that needs their specific trade.

Years ago photogs were needed for amongst other things calibrating ships guns, aerial reconnaissance, equipment defect photography, medical photography, public relations, covering ships visits to overseas ports etc.

I note that some of you have displayed photographs of their branch/department on board ship or establishment, this again was usually done by a ships photog. Serving as ships company on the old Ark for 4 years, I did our section duties and ships duties, supporting the ships company in all ways. At sea with squadrons onboard, we photographed all launches and recovery's using 16mm hand held cine cameras from first light until sunset, as well as hand held still cameras. Contrary to a FDO's comments on this thread we did not have video cameras mounted on FLYCO for this purpose.

In addition to these duties we photographed defective aircraft equipment so that the images could be sent to the manufacturer, plus many a time we were down in the engine room and other ships dept's doing the same defect type photography. I remember that at one time we had to photograph the empty space left by a Buccaneer that rolled off the deck at night because the chockheads had not lashed it down!

A camera was located on the flight deck of the old ARK, adjacent to the arrestor wires, and photographed each landing from the flight deck level and any time a heavy landing was suspected, we would unload the film, process it and have it back to the FDO within a few minutes to determine if the wire had to be cut and replaced. All VIPS were photographed and presented with an album of their visit before they left the ship, and additionally we were loaned to small ships for any PR coverage they might need. We of course did provide a service to the ships company by selling photographs, and indeed it was a very profitable business, however, we did work our butts off almost every night after our normal duties, and mostly until 2-3 in the morning.

The survival of the RN depends on amongst other things, the media and the Navies exposure to the public, the Navy Photog is still providing this service plus many of the other duties I mentioned. Digital is now king, and unfortunately this tends to make every person that has a digital camera think that they are a professional photographer. Thirty plus years after leaving the mob, I am still a photographer and have my own business, having the experience of being a Navy Photog has put me in good stead, something that a digital camera can never replace.

I believe that many of our Navy photogs are serving in some of the war zones today, as well as regular ship borne duties.

Anyway, thats my tuppence worth. By the way Nutty, I was at Ganges 1961 :money:

Cheers,

Mick
Mick
You forgot the most important thing that the phots did on the old ark.
Make loads of dosh from phot sales, and do you remember Egbert?
:thumright:
Like Mick I recall making a lot of money. A car at Whale Island with the Commander riding his bike. The Korean war with our Phot Section at USN Sasebo reeling it it in and Malaya with those pictures of bandits brought aboard HMNZ Black Prince making a mint. The Kiwis had no photographic facilities so we did it for them. My memories of the photographic branch -rabbits, rabbits and more rabbits. That's all I can remember, going to the Ship's Office to pay the money in to a POSB account. Happy days
 
Dont touch sewing machines and haven't since training. Ignorance is bliss! I have a few mates who are civvy fireman and trust me they laugh at you just as much as the rest of us. You attend so many major fires or RTA's dont you. How can you even talk about your job and theirs in the same breath, what a shock your in for when you leave! Tescos should be ok for trolley movers though.
 

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