Medical

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by Jay_23, Oct 3, 2008.

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  1. Hi Guys and girls.

    I have just passed my psychometric test, and have been given a date for my medical. I'm a bit worried about this as unfortunately I had childhood Leukeamia. It does say on the application forms you fill in that although malignancy/ Cancer would normally exclude you, exeptions are made for childhood cancers which are now considered cured. This is the case for me however I have learned to be cynical about such things. I am in perfectly good health now and since being treated have never had any other occurences or other serious ilnesses. Nevertheless I am anxious about the medical and was wondering if anyone knows anything about the requirements or if they know of other people who have had the same experience.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Jay
     
  2. Hello Jay and Welcome to the site!

    The people who will be able to give you the best answers are the two Recruiters and the Medic who answer questions here on a regular basis. I expect that they will all look at your question between now and Monday, so by then you should have much more clarification.

    Best wishes

    Soleil
     
  3. Thanks very much Soleil will look out for them :)
     
  4. Just as a matter of interest, which branch are you interested in?
     
  5. I have applied as an ETME as my first choice and ETWE as my second choice.
     
  6. Thanks Angrydoc

    This is exactly what hacks me off!! Running into problems due to ignorance and lack of understanding. Some of the little runts I've seen pass through the selection.....well you get my point.

    Honestly what is the chuffin point!!
     
  7. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker War Hero Moderator

    Further to angrydocs qualified comments & speaking as a recruiter who is not qualified to give medical opinion:

    Not wishing to build your hopes nor dash them, the thing to remember is that civilian medical professionals, whilst no doubt expert in their field, are not always best placed to give definitive indications as to whether an individual is fit for military service as the standards for military service are rather unique. They can certainly express a medical opinion, but not state for example that in their opinion someone should be passed fit for military service. They can certainly suggest they cannot envisage it being a problem that cannot be treated satisfactorily in its worst manifestation by a first aid trained paramedic without specialist medication, technical knowledge, specific drugs or equipment.

    There is no automatic right of appeal against a medical decision however you need to be aware of what you are appealing against should the need arise.

    The Medical Examiner is constrained by the legally enforced medical standards for entry. You cannot appeal against the set standards which the Doctor must abide by, no matter what.

    In general terms you must be 100% clear of any medicinal or therapeutic treatment & the condition, if left completely untreated must not affect your ability to do the job nor endanger others. Often you must be clear of a condition for a set period of time to ensure there is little or no chance of recurrence.

    For some conditions, once positively diagnosed, there is categorically no leeway and the condition is an immediate bar to entry. In these cases you can only appeal against the diagnosis by providing proof that you did not & do not have the condition or when a medical professional is prepared to admit you were misdiagnosed. The outcome is then referred to the service consultant specialist in this field for a definitive answer.

    For other conditions, once positively diagnosed, there is a degree of leeway and the severity of a condition is the governing factor with regard medical suitability for entry. In these cases you can only appeal against the prognosis of the effect or extent of the condition by providing proof that you are not significantly affected by the condition and a medical professional is prepared to verify your claim. The outcome is then referred to the service consultant specialist in this field for a definitive answer or further tests to prove your ability to serve or otherwise.

    Hope that goes some way to explain the reasons and mechanics behind the standards set. The Medical Examiner is actually on your side but has to follow the rules, which in turn are their to safeguard the individual rather than deliberately exclude them.

    Whatever the outcome, good luck to you.
     

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