Medical discharge or PVR?

allyballybee

Badgeman
Stuff your pasties........ we have bridies!
I would say no, but I have seen Jock pies being deep fried (they then put them upside down in the glass bit so some of the excess fat can run out of the hole in the top!) , so it is probably a possible!
They have to do that otherwise third degree burns ensue. You are not far from the truth, our village bakery runs a promotion every week, Bridie Friday, every bridie comes with a scratchcard, prize = another bridie!

I'm stretching this thread a bit thin now, reluctant to miss out on the bad jokes and banter now I've got used to them (and the sage words of wisdom), but probably time to move on. I may spy on the goings on for a while and will come back if there are developments worth sharing but I actually have two other sons at home who have been slightly sidelined recently, are much less trouble than their big brother and deserve a bit more attention so I will try to wean myself off Navy net for the time being.

Bye for now and thanks for all the help X
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Best of luck to you and your son @allyballybee, we wish you well.

I do wonder about the AFCO though, from what my son says his interview was a bit perfunctory, also I had struggled to get him properly engaged with researching the RN, he really did the minimum ( which did ring a tiny alarm bell in my head even though he worked hard on fitness and RT revision). I suppose it's very hard to judge with youngsters how genuinely keen and realistic they are and there comes a point when if a potential recruit ticks all the boxes you have to take a punt on them rather than tell them to come back in a year when they've had more time to think about it...
The selection interview at the AFCO lasts around 45 minutes to an hour, we send them away for about an hour to complete a report, then bring the candidate back to discuss the selection decision.

Most candidates come away thinking it was a pleasant, relaxed and informal chat, not realising that as trained interviewers we have surreptitiously extracted a truly startling level of pertinent detail and information in order to decide whether the individual has it in them to not only join the service, but successfully undertake training.

Obviously there are areas where people can deceive and deliberately omit stuff about themselves, it is only a short assessment, but we can usually tell from body language and eye movements signalling recall or imagination, evasion, etc., whether the individuals are being totally honest. If they aren't, we report it as a reservation and risk. Interviewers aren't medically trained nor trained in law or finance, but if I was allowed to disclose the things we find out about people during this "chat" (as they see it), it would probably blow their minds ;)

The selection process for the RN is fairly stringent to minimise training risk (and cost) ranging from the initial psychometric tests, interviews, medical checks and examinations, physical tests, to even a pass/fail pre joining course (PRNC). Indeed, training itself is a selection process involving training, assessment & testing (including drugs tests) before the individual is deemed OK to do the job. The further they get through the selection process toward becoming a trained rank/rate, the more expensive it becomes if they fail.

Royal Navy selection is certainly not without flaws, but not many companies demand such exacting standards from their employees.

Anyway. Every best wish & if we can help further....shout out.
 

allyballybee

Badgeman
@Ninja_Stoker it sounds as if it was the information passed to me by my son about the interview that was perfunctory rather than the interview itself, sorry if I was casting aspersions on your profession, not what I intended. At the time he really believed he wanted to join it was me that had a slight niggle as I felt he hadn't delved into the reality of training and life at sea enough: he refused to watch the dreaded "Navy School" after seeing the trailers, in case it put him off ( he was possibly right about that) and has the usual teenage boy aversion to reading anything! I suppose, sometimes, people, especially young people, really want to do something and then really don't, just like that, it's just not how my brain tends to work these days.

I really am going now... probably.
 

24681012

Badgeman
Best of luck to you and your son @allyballybee, we wish you well.


The selection interview at the AFCO lasts around 45 minutes to an hour, we send them away for about an hour to complete a report, then bring the candidate back to discuss the selection decision.

Most candidates come away thinking it was a pleasant, relaxed and informal chat, not realising that as trained interviewers we have surreptitiously extracted a truly startling level of pertinent detail and information in order to decide whether the individual has it in them to not only join the service, but successfully undertake training.

Obviously there are areas where people can deceive and deliberately omit stuff about themselves, it is only a short assessment, but we can usually tell from body language and eye movements signalling recall or imagination, evasion, etc., whether the individuals are being totally honest. If they aren't, we report it as a reservation and risk. Interviewers aren't medically trained nor trained in law or finance, but if I was allowed to disclose the things we find out about people during this "chat" (as they see it), it would probably blow their minds ;)

The selection process for the RN is fairly stringent to minimise training risk (and cost) ranging from the initial psychometric tests, interviews, medical checks and examinations, physical tests, to even a pass/fail pre joining course (PRNC). Indeed, training itself is a selection process involving training, assessment & testing (including drugs tests) before the individual is deemed OK to do the job. The further they get through the selection process toward becoming a trained rank/rate, the more expensive it becomes if they fail.

Royal Navy selection is certainly not without flaws, but not many companies demand such exacting standards from their employees.

Anyway. Every best wish & if we can help further....shout out.
Do you ever fail candidates at interview or just mark them up as ' risk'? If you fail candidates, typically what would be a the reason?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Do you ever fail candidates at interview or just mark them up as ' risk'? If you fail candidates, typically what would be a the reason?
Frequently. Candidates fail their selection interview daily on a national basis.

Odds are, they do not fully appreciate the fact they've failed the interview by virtue of the manner in which the feedback is delivered.

Rather than say "You're not suitable and cannot join", we tend to advise options available and, under what circumstances they could meet the standards required.

Sometimes people get knocked back for seemingly innocuous reasons such as not knowing enough about their chosen branch, never having washed or ironed their own clothes, poor or tardy school or work attendance, critically ill next of kin, partners expecting first child, disciplinary issues at home or in work or education, lack of teamwork activities, poor record of fitness, dishonesty, etc., etc.

The bottom line, is it's a whole lot more than just a job that they are being interviewed for.
 
Top