Medical discharge or PVR?

allyballybee

Badgeman
I joined at 16, but had the maturity of an 8 year old. :)
Grew up quickly around around May 1982 :(
That would do it :(.

From what I've learned on here having a sense of humour is an essential requirement for surviving in the navy, it seems to make you more resilient. They can sort out a lot of typical immature youngster issues with training but if you are too serious, quiet, a bit of a worrier, as my son turns out to be (in public anyway, not so much at home!) and can't have a laugh to diffuse tricky situations and bond with your colleagues you are in for a tough time.

I've made him sound like a bit of a pain, which he probably has been recently, but he'll have learned more in the past three months about life and his own strengths and weaknesses than he did in the whole two years before so hopefully it will have toughened him up a bit.
 

fishhead

War Hero
@allyballybee The best you can hope for is that when he gets back home and settles down again is that he can see positives from his time in the RN. Despite his problems there has to be something he will look back on and think "I did really well to get as far as I did and it was not a waste of time"
Enjoy your holiday and expect upon your return to find all the housework up to date including the washing and ironing.;)
PS If he is anything like myself at his age he will be happy to revert to being looked after by Mum whilst at home.
 

allyballybee

Badgeman
@fishead I don't know if I'm all that happy about him reverting to being looked after! I don't know if you ever watched a programme on channel 4 called "Brat Camp"; out of control/ultra lazy middle -class kids were packed off to a youth training camp in the American West and forced to wander about, living in tents until they were "reformed" enough to come home. I used to feel quite smug watching it as my kids were still small and relatively cute at the time! It has occurred to me that basic naval training may have (fingers crossed) had a similar improving effect on my eldest. I have also thought about all those folk who pipe up with "bring back National Service", trying to get most of the youth of Britain through something akin to Raleigh would be an absolute nightmare, not to mention costing a fortune (I dread to think how much has been spent on my offspring :().
 

fishhead

War Hero
@fishead I don't know if I'm all that happy about him reverting to being looked after! I don't know if you ever watched a programme on channel 4 called "Brat Camp"; out of control/ultra lazy middle -class kids were packed off to a youth training camp in the American West and forced to wander about, living in tents until they were "reformed" enough to come home. I used to feel quite smug watching it as my kids were still small and relatively cute at the time! It has occurred to me that basic naval training may have (fingers crossed) had a similar improving effect on my eldest. I have also thought about all those folk who pipe up with "bring back National Service", trying to get most of the youth of Britain through something akin to Raleigh would be an absolute nightmare, not to mention costing a fortune (I dread to think how much has been spent on my offspring :().
Whatever happens after he gets home will need to be agreed between you and him. You strike me as one with a sensible head who will chose a form of words to engage him in his new situation and make sure he doesn't backslide to his pre-RN days. He may not have found his dream career but he has acquired many new skills which should put him in good stead for the future. I'm not imagining it will be easy for you given the mother/son bond but the sooner he realises it is time to move on(not literally) the better it will be for all parties.
 

SONAR-BENDER

War Hero
I would say no, but I have seen Jock pies being deep fried (they then put them upside down in the glass bit so some of the excess fat can run out of the hole in the top!) , so it is probably a possible!
 

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