Medical Assistant vs Nurse

RoxyLite

Midshipman
I know this is an old thread but oh well, was handy reading through everyones thoughts!

I am pondering this too, I have a place to study Adult Nursing at Uni in January, but by the time I qualify & get the 2 years experience I'll be about 27, which with waiting times and the fact I might not even get in to the Navy isnt my favourite option, and as a student nurse even less so. Also, most people at my Uni interview were 40 plus, so plenty of time for nursing (if its what I want to do anyway!)

After reading through the job description of Medical Assistant it seems so much more like what I want to be doing, what do any current or past MA's think of the role? I am not bothered about waiting times or anything as I am lucky enough to be in an okay job at the moment and its worth the wait! Whats it really like starting at the bottom, does it take a while to be sea bound or get clinical experience? And are you a sort of front runner for immediate assistance before further help arrives or...? Any info would be awesome!

:wink:
 

daffy1

War Hero
I might be able to give a bit of info as my girlfriend is in a last year of uni in nursing. It is possible for you to do both as a paramedic and a nurse, the reason being as long as you dont give up your NHS pin number you can become a paramedic and if you wish to do some part time work there is nothing stoping you from doing shift work as a nurse. My girlfriend updates me all the time as it has been mentioned here berfore nursing can open up so many different doors.
 

all_purple_now

Lantern Swinger
Sophie said:
Another question....if I enter the navy at rating level as a medical assistant and then get commissioned to become an officer, will I be able to become a medical officer, despite not having the specific qualifications needed (e.g Biology A level)?

No.

You'd have to leave to go to medical school, then rejoin in your third or later year. There are several people about who've done this.

You could be commissioned as an Medical Services Officer, but as far as I can figure out, MSOs have more of an administrative rather than clinical role.

APN
 

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