Medals, head gear and saluting Standards on parade?

hookyh

Lantern Swinger
Happy with that lads.

All makes perfect sense to me. Standards are standards and some things should always remain as they've been for many a year.

As for the Plod thing I was down in Nelson a year or so ago and was made aware of a regulating cell regularly checking ebay out. A very senior retired officer was investigated by them around that time for putting his dress tailcoat on ebay. I remember it making the papers so there must have been at least some truth to it. That being said apologies as I didn't read properly and missed the private purchase comment.

Love the idea of the Sentinels around the memorial - top effort!
 

SEP86

War Hero
Here is what QRRN says about saluting - (I have edited out a few references to other articles). There are a couple in there I had forgotten about.

9231. Salutes
1. Naval Personal Salute. The personal salute, in addition to being a mark of respect, is an act of courtesy and good manners. It is never wrong to salute even if subsequently the person saluting another discovers that person is not entitled to be saluted. All Service personnel are to salute on the occasions and in the manner prescribed below:
2. Method. The method of making the naval personal salute with the hand is laid down in BR 1834, Royal Navy Ceremonial and Drill. Ratings are to salute all Officers, and Chaplains; Officers are to salute those superior to them in rank. The naval personal hand salute is only to be made when the senior person is in uniform and wearing uniform headgear (see sub para 3
and the exception at 4a sub para (5) below). Without uniform headgear and when civilian clothes are being worn a verbal salutation is only to be given, e.g.: ‘Good Morning/Afternoon/Evening Sir/Ma’am’ by the junior person. When the junior person is in civilian clothes, sports rig or in uniform without uniform headgear the head and eyes are turned in the direction of the person to whom the compliment is being given. The mode of salute to be used by Royal Marines is that laid down in Military regulations and is taught in the Corps (see BR 2118, Royal Marines Drill).
3. Uniform Headgear is any heargear identified in Naval Uniform regulations (BR 81).
4. Saluting Occasions
a. All officers and ratings in uniform are to salute the following on all occasions:
2 Other members of the Royal Family As in Serial 1B and to all other members of the Royal Family
All members of Royal Family
All officers in uniform
3 Governors-General, Governors, High Commissioners or Officers administering British Commonwealth countries, Associated States or
Dependent Territories As in Serial 2B, to the personage on whom
the guard is mounted and to personages of similar or higher degree
As in Serial 3B Personages of lower degree and all officers in uniform
4 Officers of Flag, General or Air rank
Officers below Flag, General or Air rank in uniform
5 Officers below Flag, General or Air rank
As in Serial 5B and to field officers or the equivalent
All other officers in uniform
6 Regimental Guards As in Serials 1A, 2A, 3A and 4A and once a day to their Commanding Officer
As in Serial 5C All other officers in uniform
(1) The Queen and all members of the Royal Family and foreign Royal Families whether they are in uniform or civilian clothes.
(2) Officers in uniform senior to them of the Royal Navy, Royal Marines, Royal Naval Reserve and Royal Marines Reserve, and commissioned officers in the Army and Royal Air Force. Sea Cadet Corps and Combined Cadet Force (CCF) officers should also be saluted when carrying out their duties as such.
(3) Uniformed officers senior to them of Commonwealth naval, military and air forces.
(4) Uniformed officers senior to them of foreign naval, military and air forces.
(5) Officers in plain clothes recognised and known to be senior officers when arriving/departing official functions. (see sub para b, sub para c and sub para d).
(6) Occupants of cars flying official military distinguishing flags or pennants, or bearing star plates, of senior officers.
(7) Uncased Colours carried by naval, army or air force units.
(8) The coffin in funeral processions.
(9) The Cenotaph, Whitehall, London.
(10) Junior officers are to salute their superiors on the first meeting each day
The following exceptions apply:
(11) In the interests of safety, the driver of a vehicle or the rider of a motorcycle or
bicycle is not to salute.
(12) Officers in attendance on Her Majesty or other Royal personages (or the personal staff of Governors-General or Governors representing the Sovereign) are not to salute when the National Anthem is played for the Royal Salute.
(13) During ceremonial parades, officers in attendance on a senior officer are not to salute when the senior officer receives a personal salute from the guard.
b. On board Her Majesty’s ships.
(1) All Officers and ratings are to salute when coming onboard or leaving one of Her Majesty’s ships. The Hand Salute is only to be made when in uniform. When civilian clothes are worn, the person saluting stands to attention at the inboard head of the brow for the duration of 2 marching paces before carrying on. For all officers, the gangway staff will return the salute of officers crossing the ship’s brow.
(2) Officers and ratings need only salute officers senior to them when addressing or being addressed by those officers on formal occasions - reporting Colours, Sunset, Rounds, Both Watches and Inspections.
c. In naval establishments. The term Naval establishments encompasses Royal Naval Air Stations and Naval Bases. The following rules for the exchange of personal salutes when in uniform are to be observed:
(1) When outdoors, a rating who is standing is to face and salute a superior officer who passes him; if sitting, or kneeling and at work, when a superior officer passes, he is, where it is safe and practicable to do so, to rise, stand to attention and salute.
(2) When outdoors two or more officers or ratings, not in an organised party, pass or are passed by a senior officer, all are to salute.
(3) When outdoors a junior officer in company with a senior officer is to salute only those officers who are senior to the latter.
(4) Officers are to return all salutes from junior officers and ratings. When two or more officers together are saluted, the senior officer only is to return the salute.
(5) When outdoors organised party at the halt in the charge of an officer or rating is passed by a senior officer, only the officer or rating in charge is to salute, first calling the party to attention and to face the appropriate direction.
(6) Salutes to be given by organised parties on the march as follows:
(a) Whem commanded by an officer: the officer-in-charge is to give the order ‘Eyes Right’ (or ‘Left’) and is to salute when passing:
(i). An officer senior to the officer-in-charge and equivalent ranks in the
other Services.
(ii). The Colours of the Royal Navy, Queen’s Colours or Regimental
Colours, uncased.
(iii). The body when a funeral is passing.
Notes:
1. When passing other officers senior to the officer-in-charge, formed
armed parties or guards of honour without Colours or with Colours cased,
the officer-in-charge of the party is to salute.
2. When saluted by officers junior to the officer-in-charge, or ratings, the
officer-in-charge of the party is to return the salute.
(b) When commanded by a rating: the rating-in-charge is to give the order ‘Eyes Right’ (or ‘Left’) and is to salute when passing:
(i). All officers.
(ii). The Colours of the Royal Navy, Queen’s Colours or Regimental
Colours, uncased.
(iii). The body when a funeral procession is passing.
(iv). A formed armed party
(v). When returning the salute of an unarmed party or sentry.
(c) When indoors, except during a formal inspection, rounds or presentations, personal salutes are not required, however when a superior officer of any armed service enters the office of a junior officer or rating, the junior officer or rating should, if seated, rise and give the greeting ‘Good Morning/Afternoon/Evening Sir/Ma’am’.
d. In other Military and Ministry of Defence Headquarters and establishments. The rules and guidance at 4 sub para c above will apply unless varied or relaxed by that establishment’s Commanding Officer, Principal or Head of Establishment.
3. Hoisting or Hauling Down Colours. When the Colours are hoisted or hauled down and when the National Anthem, and/or Commonwealth and foreign national anthems are played, all officers and ratings not fallen in are to face in the appropriate direction and stand to attention, saluting if in uniform and wearing uniform headgear, when in sight of the mast or
ensign during the ceremony. If the mast or ensign cannot be seen they are to face the general direction and stand to attention during the ceremony. Parties fallen in are to be called to attention by the officer or rating in charge, who alone is to salute. When a national anthem is
played indoors or between decks, individual officers and ratings in uniform are to salute if wearing uniform headgear; if uncovered, they are to remain uncovered and stand to attention; those in plain clothes are to stand to attention uncovered.
 

R12_CV

Lantern Swinger
Deckhead_Inspector said:
Associations standards may be saluted but I would not make a habit of it, however, doing it keeps the old boys happy.
(R 12, would you salute a Matlot in C95 just because he has an Ensign on his arm?. No, thought not.)

:D :D I'd look a bit daft saluting an insignia, as opposed something that flutters in the wind...!

But I'm now confused by your interpretation, are you saying you would salute a standard... or you wouldn't??? :?:
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Book Reviewer
Re: 2_deck_dash: No you won't get a visit from someone wearing an NP armlet - Mod Police CID/RN Police SIB don't wear them... :wink:

Re: Hooky: Correctomuno about us checking eBay for Service personnel selling kit/equipment, but of course I'm not at liberty to divulge more... :twisted:
 

2_deck_dash

War Hero
sgtpepperband said:
Re: 2_deck_dash: No you won't get a visit from someone wearing an NP armlet - Mod Police CID/RN Police SIB don't wear them... :wink:

Re: Hooky: Correctomuno about us checking eBay for Service personnel selling kit/equipment, but of course I'm not at liberty to divulge more... :twisted:

I still wonder how it would pan out in a civvy court though.

A. There is absolutely no way that anyone could prove that I didn't buy the kit privately in the first place.

B. If I can sell it, then am I supposed to hang on to all this shite for the rest of my life? If so I intend to charge storage!

C. RN Plod are far too busy dolling out 9's to pissed up matelots for fighting and turning to shiters to worry about what I get up to! :wink:
 

sgtpepperband

War Hero
Book Reviewer
2DD:

a. Ways and means; and with the additional powers that the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 bring, a suspicion is all we need... :wink:

b. You only need to keep the required kit that you have to produce as part of your Reserve Service committmentn. The rest should be returned to Naval Stores (as it never belonged to you in the first place - you were just "looking after it" while you were in Service...)

c. Our role, duties and powers have changed significantly in the last couple of years; in particular with the introduction of Armed Forces Act 2006 on 31 Oct 09... :thumbleft:

But if you bring a packet of chocolate suggestives to my office, I might turn a blind eye to it! :lol:
 
I am a WO at PRESIDENT, I will look into this and report back accordingly.
I assure you that if the alleged disrespect took place I will kick their bloody backsides all around the drill deck, Human Rights blah blah
 

hookyh

Lantern Swinger
Sgt. Pepper:

Thanks for confirming! Serves any offenders right should they decide to sell serious property belonging to Her Maj. That being said I'm sure smally items wouldn't be worth even batting an eyelid at. Anyone trying to sell a major item or anything of use to the 'other side' is asking for trouble and would also have to be a complete egit. I'm sure there are a few around, otherwise you wouldn't be watching in the first place, but I'm also certain that the vast majority of folks out there have a few more brain cells than that.
 

rogerthecabinboy

Lantern Swinger
2_deck_dash said:
On a seperate note, if anyone on here is serving at HMS President please could you kindly have a quiet word with the AB and two Lieutenants who were chatting throughout the service of remembrance at St Pauls Cathedral, and didn't stand to attention during the last post or national anthem yesterday.

Cheers
It is a sad but inescapable fact that many RNR JO's lack the ethos and depth of knowledge required for their rank. The AB is not blameless, 8O but poorly lead.
Serving five years or so as a junior rate would instill manners and respect, while detering the "cool rig to get married to Cynthers in" set, before becoming gentlemen.

donning ECBA as I type,
 

2_deck_dash

War Hero
MasterChief said:
I am a WO at PRESIDENT, I will look into this and report back accordingly.
I assure you that if the alleged disrespect took place I will kick their bloody backsides all around the drill deck, Human Rights blah blah

I don't think they were intentionally being disrespectful, they just didn't know the correct way to behave which to be honest is just as bad. I'm pretty sure it was lesson 1 at Raleigh, straight after the haircuts, that we were taught when to stand to attention, when to salute etc.
 

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