Man arrested for stealing broadband

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by Hawkeye, Aug 22, 2007.

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  1. That'll be me off to chokey then ... oops ... :whew:
     
  2. yeah, protect it or suffer the freeloaders.
    It isn't stealing, what a nonsense.
     
  3. In an insurance situation, if you don't protect your own assets then you don't get sompensated when they go missing. I'd suggest it's the responsibility of the buyer to protect their service, and frankly that avoids other security issues as well.

    Frankly I think arrest is somewhat OTT. Proportionality and the fact that, without monitoring kit they can't tell how much capacity was exploited would indicate to me that this is pretty spurious.

    In any case, what right have any f*cking coppers got to walk up to someone and start questioning him on something like that. Not convinced I'd have been that impressed at 0815 this morning when I was sitting in my car, using my laptop, to start being questioned about what I was up to. (fwiw I was early for a meeting and decided to download some email over 3G)
     
  4. chieftiff

    chieftiff War Hero Moderator

    Admitting anything to a community support officer was a little foolish, they might even meet their performance target without getting out of the car!

    How does open access sound "guv"? I was on holiday in June, moored outside a pub, the pub had a sign advertising free wi-fi access. When I asked the landlord what the password was for the network he simply stated there: "isn't one, refresh your available networks list and just click on the one with no encryption." Was I stealing his "open" network boadband if I hadn't asked?

    Incidentally, when I did refresh my network list there were about 10 networks, 3 had no encryption, I still don't know which one was the pub!
     
  5. Kinel I've been doing it for about three months better stop then ooopppps :rambo: :rambo: :rambo:
     
  6. Shitf over GR I'll be joining you
     
  7. the_matelot

    the_matelot War Hero Moderator

    If you're stupid enough to not lock down your wireless network, then you deserve everything you get. Especially if you use WEP Encryption as that is crackable in 59 seconds.

    Saying that, if you do get caught with a packet analyser and network sniffer, you ARE breaking the law and are liable to be prosecuted under various Acts.

    It's a double edged sword though-if I found a wireless network that looked like it was locked down securely, then I'd ask myself 'what exactly are they trying to protect?' and that would make me more curious.
     
  8. I frequently help myself to free broadband whilst I'm out on my travels. There was a chap in the block with an unsecured network while I was on chippie's course. If its stealing then guilty as charged.
     
  9. Must admit I use WEP and thought I was reasonably secure . I am , vaguely , aware of alternatives so any chance of a brief explanation or a guiding light . It would make it easy if the ' range ' of the router could be controlled I reckon but regardles of anything good like WLAN there's always some scumbag waiting to pounce.

    :threaten:
     
  10. been trying to set up my router all night. if anyone can help they can gladly come and steal it :). All i want is to play mario strikers online on my Wii
     
  11. WEP keys are more complicated than they need to be and at the same time are easy to crack if you know how, go for WPA-PSK if you can I've been led to believe that its more secure, and I know for a fact that it is much easier to use!
     
  12. Bugger, I thought it was foolproof. Perhaps I should desist checking my bank details using my iBook...... :oops: :oops: :oops:
     
  13. Care to qualify that?

    As for the justice, you are stealing from the Broadband provider, not the end user. It is as much theft as it would be if you had an illegal electricity, water or gas connection.

    As to the circumstances of this case, from what I've read it seems like the guy admitted it without much prompting from the temp plods.
     
  14. Care to qualify that?

    As for the justice, you are stealing from the Broadband provider, not the end user. It is as much theft as it would be if you had an illegal electricity, water or gas connection.

    As to the circumstances of this case, from what I've read it seems like the guy admitted it without much prompting from the temp plods.[/quote]

    Its not the same as gas or electricity as it is a service not a commodity.

    If I listen to the band playing in my local hotel from my garden without paying my entrance fee am I stealing.



    Don't think so
     
  15. Danny,

    When you say you have been trying to set up your router, do you mean for broadband or to work with the wii?

    The first is easy, the second I havent tried but dont imagine its that difficult

    HB
     
  16. Wouldn't making it cheaper to buy braoadband stop all, if not most, of this practise ?

    At average £15 - 20 pm is a bit steep, hence I am still happy with dial-up at the cost of a phone call - slower to connect but a a lot cheaper. And as they state ' speeds up to 8mb depending on the distance from the hub' seems a bit of con really...
     
  17. In Norwich they have "Openlink". This is a free to use service supplied by the council. If I am sat in an area where I can pick up openlink, which is 512kbps (for the non technical, the slowest available broadband) but am on someone's private connection with an 8mpbs connection how do others know?

    The "Openlink" is open to debate as to the real reason it is there. Us locals believe it is a back door to road charging in the area (openlink is available around the ringroad, but not inside!).

    HookieBuntz
     
  18. The end user is paying for the service, and if they have a capped provision then you are stealing from them, not the provider.

    But personally I think it should be up to the end user to protect that service themselves, the vendor has no responsibility.

    The service interface is the port in the wall, where the router is plugged into. The end user owns the router and should protect it.
     
  19. Its not the same as gas or electricity as it is a service not a commodity.

    If I listen to the band playing in my local hotel from my garden without paying my entrance fee am I stealing.



    Don't think so[/quote]


    I do think so, but the stupid year 2007 look how clever we are PLOD used the wrong charge try.

    13. Abstracting of electricity

    A person who dishonestly uses without due authority, or dishonestly
    causes to be wasted or diverted, any electricity shall on conviction on
    indictment be liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding five years.


    Theft Act 1968.

    The man is stealing however a small amount and however little cost the power used to power the wireless network. It is not up to the owner to protect his assets it up others to respect his property and rights. Too many people on this thread that think they know their rights but have no concept of their RESPONSIBILITIES>

    Guilty M'Lud

    Nutty
     

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