MA - Opinions please

Sierra_Whisky

Midshipman
Just learn the following phrase off by heart, practice uttering it whilst opening a one kilogramme tub of paracetemol, wearing socks with sandals...and with a Mr McKay twitch (from Porridge) as you raise the inflection at the end of the statement:

"Take two of these with water after each meal. If it's no better by a week today, come back".

Haha, is it best to also look to schedule a follow up visit on the day I'm not working?!
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
Haha, is it best to also look to schedule a follow up visit on the day I'm not working?!

As long as it's not a saturday or sunday, then most certainly pop into your AFCO to ask any questions you may wish & perhaps watch the branch DVD. The tip is to call in early as they tend to get busier towards lunchtime onwards. Friday afternoons in a big AFCO are not dissimilar to an inner city A&E department on a saturday night/sunday morning.
 

Andy_Cap

War Hero
Just learn the following phrase off by heart, practice uttering it whilst opening a one kilogramme tub of paracetemol, wearing socks with sandals...and with a Mr McKay twitch (from Porridge) as you raise the inflection at the end of the statement:

"Take two of these with water after each meal. If it's no better by a week today, come back".

Don`t forget to add for Stokers " get plenty of fresh air and Shower daily " and you will never see them again

always worked for me ;P
 

Sierra_Whisky

Midshipman
I'm due at AFCO for the initial presentation in a couple of weeks, so I'll be sure to go armed with a list of questions. I'm assuming dress code is suited and booted for the presentation. That's how I'm planning to go anyway unless someone advises me it's best to go dressed otherwise?

Cheers

SW
 

gammaguy117

Lantern Swinger
Just learn the following phrase off by heart, practice uttering it whilst opening a one kilogramme tub of paracetemol, wearing socks with sandals...and with a Mr McKay twitch (from Porridge) as you raise the inflection at the end of the statement:

"Take two of these with water after each meal. If it's no better by a week today, come back".

I can see im going to fit right into my new career :D ;)
 

gammaguy117

Lantern Swinger
I'm due at AFCO for the initial presentation in a couple of weeks, so I'll be sure to go armed with a list of questions. I'm assuming dress code is suited and booted for the presentation. That's how I'm planning to go anyway unless someone advises me it's best to go dressed otherwise?

Cheers


SW

Personally I always dress smart when I go into the AFCO. Never hurts to look smart and make a good impression.
 

andym

War Hero
/Pedant mode on

If you want to practice medicine, then you will need to go to University and obtain a medical degree. If you want to be a medic and obtain a basic skill in patient assessment and treatment (akin to a paramedic with a few add-ons) then crack on and apply for MA entry. There is a number of MAs who think they are, or think they know better than, doctors. They are usually so unaware of their own inadequacies that this myth perpetuates throughout their career.

/Pedant mode off.

It works both ways.I have worked with "Doctors" who frankly,i wouldnt let them loose on a slug!Its all down to experience and expanding your knowledge base.There are plenty on Nurses out there that know far more about certain parts of Medicine than your average Doctor.I refute your comment about "basic skill in patient assessment and treatment".MA's often are deployed in the front line where the bullets fly,Doctors tend to be in the rear with the gear,awaiting to treat mainly surgical patients.You cant have some "basically" trained Medic on the front line if they dont come up to scratch.Remember the "Golden Hour"?Initial stabilisation and treatment HAS to be of the highest class or whats the point of shipping them out to the Hospital by MEDEVAC?I dont doubt there are a certain number of "prima donnas",but they abound in every trade.I dont doubt that there ARE some senior MA's that actually DO know more about certain aspects of Medicine than some Doctors,just beacuse a Doctor does 6 years Med School then a lot more further training,it doesnt follow that they are brilliant and Gods gift to Medicine!BOTH are integral parts of a team and back each other up and rely on each others strengths to achieve the best result for the Patient and not the Doctors bloody Ego!
 

Rumrat

War Hero
=)
Is that why you're often in there then?!
Indeed I was, it tends to be a great place in a ship for the MA to be. Especially as they even gave me a brand new title from when I was a humble SBA.
I am a bit puzzled by angry docs comment about an MA being on a par with a Paramedic. I had to do shed loads of training to obtain the Paramedic handle, far and above MA status. I worked with Ma's in Bosnia who were well below our standard, and that is not said with any disrespect to my old branch. So having done the two I think I can make a fair comparison.
Mind the Naval nurses I met and worked with were a right clewed up bunch, very professional.
We could ask Rod gearing for a "second opinion".;)
 
A

angrydoc

Guest
Andym, Rumrat

My comments were meant to be pedantic regarding "practicing medicine". MAs do not practice medicine, no matter how good they are.

Andy, I know what training MAs have - I train them. I also do a lot of pre-deployment stuff and know what the standard is. Your impression of "front line" work has been slightly updated now - MOs patrol regularly at Role 1 as well as MAs and CMTs. The senior guys are further back in the field hospital, but MERT usually features either a Surg Lt Cdr or Surg Cdr (occasionally a Surg Capt).

Regarding the Golden Hour - this principle is now out of date and has been superceded. As previously mentioned though, initial assessment and treatment is done by either a medic or medical officer, depending on the patrol (it is nigh on impossible to "stabilise" a trauma patient with a couple of litres of Hartmanns solution and an Asherman chest seal).

I mentioned "basic assessment and treatment" because that is what MAs are designed to do! There are no advanced facilities in Role 1 (either on land or afloat). In fairness, MOs at Role 1 have no extra kit - a few extra drugs but no extra kit. This ensures Role 1 care is just that and not some hybrid that has been made up on the hoof.

Now I'm going to get controversial - I have met countless POMAs and CPOMAs who seem to believe they know so much more than the average doctor: it is actually quite scary. Whilst there are quite a few shit doctors about, and good MAs, the assumption that relatively basic training and experience of not that many sick people equates to that of a doctor who has done any amount of emergency medicine is quite frankly laughable. And again, I train MAs - many come through my ED every year.

So whilst it is acceptable to defend your branch, I am not attacking it. I am trying to put the work of a medic into perspective.

RR - the paramedic thing I know is not the best comparison for an MA, but I struggle to think of an alternative. I usually use "a paramedic with extended skills in primary care" - but obviously there isn't a direct comparison.

Apols for the thread drift.
 

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