Lockheed Martin: "F-35 STOVL Variant Flies Supersonic"

Seaweed

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#2
This: "The F-35 program has about 900 suppliers in 45 states, and directly and indirectly employs more than 127,000 people. Thousands more are employed in the F-35 partner countries, which have invested more than $4 billion in the project. Those countries are the United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Australia, Denmark and Norway" is of course far more important than any sort of combat capability.
 
#5
:roll: Whils everyone is waxing lyrical about the Vstol F-S5 . Could some grown up, explain to me how we are going to operate a "proper"( as in Hawkeye type!! ) Awacs Aircraft from the 2 new Carriers
 
#6
Joint_Force_Harrier said:
So they are replacing the Sea Harrier?

On the ball Lockheed :?
What's your point? SHAR may have been withdrawn prematurely, leaving a serious gap in the RN's organic air defence capability, but it has always been the intention to replace it with JSF.

THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE SEA HARRIER
House of Commons Select Committee on Defence Fourth Report 3 July 2002 said:
71. Joint Force Harrier, combining Royal Navy Sea Harrier FA2 and RAF Harrier GR7 aircraft, was established following the 1998 Strategic Defence Review. This reflected a degree of interchangeability in these aircraft, and a common capability of being able to operate both off carriers and from airfields. When the previous Committee took evidence on the SDR, our predecessors were told that commonality of the two aircraft types was about 10%[163] although more recently a figure of 20% has been reported.[164] The Harrier GR7s are due to be stood-down in 2015 when they will be replaced by the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which is to be introduced into service from 2012 on current plans.[165] The Sea Harrier had been programmed to leave operational service in 2012, again to be replaced by the JSF.[166] But on 28 February 2002 the MoD announced that the Sea Harrier would be withdrawn from service between 2004 and 2006,[167] 6-8 years earlier than its previously planned out-of-service date.

72. Although the Sea Harrier entered service in 1979, it was given a major upgrade in 1993 (paragraph 75), and an attrition purchase of 18 new aircraft was approved in 1993 and delivered between 1994 and 1997.[168] A significant proportion of the Sea Harrier fleet will therefore be less than 10 years old when withdrawn. Whatever the rationale for withdrawing the Sea Harriers early, which we discuss below, it is regrettable that the MoD was taking delivery of new Sea Harriers only a very few years before making that decision. At the very least, we are presented with a poor impression of long term planning in the MoD...

76. The withdrawal of the Sea Harrier appears then to leave the Royal Navy without an air-defence aircraft until the introduction of the Joint Strike Fighter from 2012 (and the JSF itself is primarily a ground-attack aircraft) . Filling such a capability gap would fall in part to the anti-air destroyers, including from 2007 the Type-45 destroyer and its PAAMS missiles, and this is explored further below...
 

Toucan

Lantern Swinger
#7
Naval_Gazer said:
Joint_Force_Harrier said:
So they are replacing the Sea Harrier?

On the ball Lockheed :?
What's your point? SHAR may have been withdrawn prematurely, leaving a serious gap in the RN's organic air defence capability, but it has always been the intention to replace it with JSF.

THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE SEA HARRIER
House of Commons Select Committee on Defence Fourth Report 3 July 2002 said:
71. Joint Force Harrier, combining Royal Navy Sea Harrier FA2 and RAF Harrier GR7 aircraft, was established following the 1998 Strategic Defence Review. This reflected a degree of interchangeability in these aircraft, and a common capability of being able to operate both off carriers and from airfields. When the previous Committee took evidence on the SDR, our predecessors were told that commonality of the two aircraft types was about 10%[163] although more recently a figure of 20% has been reported.[164] The Harrier GR7s are due to be stood-down in 2015 when they will be replaced by the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which is to be introduced into service from 2012 on current plans.[165] The Sea Harrier had been programmed to leave operational service in 2012, again to be replaced by the JSF.[166] But on 28 February 2002 the MoD announced that the Sea Harrier would be withdrawn from service between 2004 and 2006,[167] 6-8 years earlier than its previously planned out-of-service date.

72. Although the Sea Harrier entered service in 1979, it was given a major upgrade in 1993 (paragraph 75), and an attrition purchase of 18 new aircraft was approved in 1993 and delivered between 1994 and 1997.[168] A significant proportion of the Sea Harrier fleet will therefore be less than 10 years old when withdrawn. Whatever the rationale for withdrawing the Sea Harriers early, which we discuss below, it is regrettable that the MoD was taking delivery of new Sea Harriers only a very few years before making that decision. At the very least, we are presented with a poor impression of long term planning in the MoD...

76. The withdrawal of the Sea Harrier appears then to leave the Royal Navy without an air-defence aircraft until the introduction of the Joint Strike Fighter from 2012 (and the JSF itself is primarily a ground-attack aircraft) . Filling such a capability gap would fall in part to the anti-air destroyers, including from 2007 the Type-45 destroyer and its PAAMS missiles, and this is explored further below...
So what's the general rule here? It seems to be:
Cost = Estimate*2
Delivery Year = Estimate+6
Quantity = Estimate/2

Perhaps this will all be explained when we discover the Higgs Boson.

As I understand it, Lockheed Martin are due to deliver one or two F35Bs some time on 2012, which will then undergo trials for introduction around 2018.
 
#8
Toucan said:
Naval_Gazer said:
Joint_Force_Harrier said:
So they are replacing the Sea Harrier?

On the ball Lockheed :?
What's your point? SHAR may have been withdrawn prematurely, leaving a serious gap in the RN's organic air defence capability, but it has always been the intention to replace it with JSF.

THE DECOMMISSIONING OF THE SEA HARRIER
House of Commons Select Committee on Defence Fourth Report 3 July 2002 said:
71. Joint Force Harrier, combining Royal Navy Sea Harrier FA2 and RAF Harrier GR7 aircraft, was established following the 1998 Strategic Defence Review. This reflected a degree of interchangeability in these aircraft, and a common capability of being able to operate both off carriers and from airfields. When the previous Committee took evidence on the SDR, our predecessors were told that commonality of the two aircraft types was about 10%[163] although more recently a figure of 20% has been reported.[164] The Harrier GR7s are due to be stood-down in 2015 when they will be replaced by the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which is to be introduced into service from 2012 on current plans.[165] The Sea Harrier had been programmed to leave operational service in 2012, again to be replaced by the JSF.[166] But on 28 February 2002 the MoD announced that the Sea Harrier would be withdrawn from service between 2004 and 2006,[167] 6-8 years earlier than its previously planned out-of-service date.

72. Although the Sea Harrier entered service in 1979, it was given a major upgrade in 1993 (paragraph 75), and an attrition purchase of 18 new aircraft was approved in 1993 and delivered between 1994 and 1997.[168] A significant proportion of the Sea Harrier fleet will therefore be less than 10 years old when withdrawn. Whatever the rationale for withdrawing the Sea Harriers early, which we discuss below, it is regrettable that the MoD was taking delivery of new Sea Harriers only a very few years before making that decision. At the very least, we are presented with a poor impression of long term planning in the MoD...

76. The withdrawal of the Sea Harrier appears then to leave the Royal Navy without an air-defence aircraft until the introduction of the Joint Strike Fighter from 2012 (and the JSF itself is primarily a ground-attack aircraft) . Filling such a capability gap would fall in part to the anti-air destroyers, including from 2007 the Type-45 destroyer and its PAAMS missiles, and this is explored further below...
So what's the general rule here? It seems to be:
Cost = Estimate*2
Delivery Year = Estimate+6
Quantity = Estimate/2

Perhaps this will all be explained when we discover the Higgs Boson.

As I understand it, Lockheed Martin are due to deliver one or two F35Bs some time on 2012, which will then undergo trials for introduction around 2018.
So they are not replacing the Sea Harrier just its B*astard brother the GR!!

Thats my point

In the grand scheme of things, yes it is a replacement, but there has been a gap? : :evil:
 
#9
Seaweed said:
This: "The F-35 program has about 900 suppliers in 45 states, and directly and indirectly employs more than 127,000 people. Thousands more are employed in the F-35 partner countries, which have invested more than $4 billion in the project. Those countries are the United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Australia, Denmark and Norway" is of course far more important than any sort of combat capability.
To be fair, that is a standard commercial press-release format, which always contains information such as share value etc.
 
#10
scouse said:
:roll: Whils everyone is waxing lyrical about the Vstol F-S5 . Could some grown up, explain to me how we are going to operate a "proper"( as in Hawkeye type!! ) Awacs Aircraft from the 2 new Carriers

We could put the ASaC7 gear into a V-22 Osprey, but as we have no money we won't and it will go into a Merlin instead.

The F-35 is all well and good, but it's late and very over budget. We can no longer afford it and I expect it will have a very rough ride through the forthcoming defence review and is on the list of very expensive and can we do without this items.
 

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