Life in the navy

#41
There are of course many more catering staff on a liner than on a war canoe, numbers of mouths to feed dictate that, but how many of them joined as untrained? What was the longest they would have been alongside in any given port?
There will be between 60 and 70 Chefs on Queen Elizabeth sharing 4 Galleys.
How much time they get alongside in exotic parts is debateable. A Cruise ship with say 5000 passengers plus crew spending pots of money will get pride of place. Money talks
 
#42
They will get more time alongside when on deployment than a cruise liner, not as many stop offs though, but liners tend to be in and out the same day, or at best a 1 night stop over when deployed, pussers war canoes wil spend between 2 & 4 days on a normal visit, and usually have a 10 - 14 day to cover station leave. I do not think things have changed that dramatically since I was in, but I am sure a current serving can confirm or update the above.

But you did not answer the question, how many of the chef on a liner join untrained?
 
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Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#43
Ninja you're not comparing like with like.
In the 80's you benefitted from a number of ships far from home enjoying the delights of the East and West not to mention the South and the not so jolly North.
Keeboo enquired of his or her opportunity for foreign travel .
We currently have two ships in exotic parts--Sutherland with 180 aboard and Echo ( in South America) with 72 aboard.
Not sure how many of those are Chefs but precious few I imagine.
It's a great shame but there it is.
To be honest, I'm not comparing the Royal Navy of yesteryear with today purely because it is irrelevant, people don't want to know what it used to be like when aiming to join, they want to know what it's like today.

The Navy has drastically reduced in number, it had when I joined. I was told all the fun had gone and we didn't go abroad anymore. People are still being spun this line today by disaffected individuals, and it still is not true.

Yes, people can join the Merchant Navy, civil airlines, become a travel rep, BBC foreign correspondant, go back-packing or lament their perceived demise of the Royal Navy, lack of aircraft on aircraft carriers and impart their wisdom on all things Naval, but this subforum is all about joining the Royal Navy today.
 
#44
To be honest, I'm not comparing the Royal Navy of yesteryear with today purely because it is irrelevant, people don't want to know what it used to be like when aiming to join, they want to know what it's like today.

The Navy has drastically reduced in number, it had when I joined. I was told all the fun had gone and we didn't go abroad anymore. People are still being spun this line today by disaffected individuals, and it still is not true.

Yes, people can join the Merchant Navy, civil airlines, become a travel rep, BBC foreign correspondant, go back-packing or lament their perceived demise of the Royal Navy, lack of aircraft on aircraft carriers and impart their wisdom on all things Naval, but this subforum is all about joining the Royal Navy today.
Every generation will be told not as good as when I was a lad, the newbie can listen to old stories, which are just that, but go on to have a full and enjoyable career, regardless of how it used to be, then in the end tell stories of how it's change, it will always change effected by a changing world. Join the Navy unqualified, travel see a bit of the he world, once qualified, if you don't like it? Leave and join the merchant navy, then you will know for sure? Good luck which ever way you go.
 
#45
They will get more time alongside when on deployment than a cruise liner, not as many stop offs though, but liners tend to be in and out the same day, or at best a 1 night stop over when deployed, pussers war canoes wil spend between 2 & 4 days on a normal visit, and usually have a 10 - 14 day to cover station leave. I do not think things have changed that dramatically since I was in, but I am sure a current serving can confirm or update the above.

But you did not answer the question, how many of the chef on a liner join untrained?
I can't comment on the numbers of cruise ships chefs that are untrained--a large number find speaking English difficult--but they get by somehow. The fact remains that for large vessels like the Queen Elizabeth will find competing with the vast American carriers and an increasing number of mammoth cruise ships- space alongside anywhere remotely interesting, will be at a premium
 
#46
w
I can't comment on the numbers of cruise ships chefs that are untrained--a large number find speaking English difficult--but they get by somehow. The fact remains that for large vessels like the Queen Elizabeth will find competing with the vast American carriers and an increasing number of mammoth cruise ships- space alongside anywhere remotely interesting, will be at a premium
wouldn't be the first time a war canoe dropped anchor and ran liberty boats, adds to the fun?
 
#47
I can't comment on the numbers of cruise ships chefs that are untrained--a large number find speaking English difficult--but they get by somehow. The fact remains that for large vessels like the Queen Elizabeth will find competing with the vast American carriers and an increasing number of mammoth cruise ships- space alongside anywhere remotely interesting, will be at a premium
You don't half talk a load of bollocks.
It doesn't matter how fantastic you think cruise ships are for chefs, it's not the RN is it?
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#49
I can't comment on the numbers of cruise ships chefs that are untrained--a large number find speaking English difficult--but they get by somehow. The fact remains that for large vessels like the Queen Elizabeth will find competing with the vast American carriers and an increasing number of mammoth cruise ships- space alongside anywhere remotely interesting, will be at a premium
In other words, you don't know.
 
#50
fence sitting twat, you snowed in or just having a bad Monday?
:D
Not snowed in. That was Thursday and Friday last week! :)
People living in the dim and very distant past, who know nothing about the subject that they are pontificating about, giving advice to today's potential recruits. :mad:
 

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#53
^^Ooo-err, that's a bit harsh on poor old Nina...
:) Funny thing is that the reason I joined Navy Net ten years ago was because there were loads of people wishing to impart their knowledge on the subject of recruitment and some of it was incorrect. Not all, just some.

I know nothing of Merchant Navy Chef careers beyond RFA personnel, so tend to stick with what I know rather than pontificate about career opportunities based on supposition elsewhere.

Every day's a school day for me, mainly because my memory is rubbish.

That said, I have been on HMS Queen Elizabeth, (an oppo helps run the Food Services element), met the people currently doing the job (amongst them, people from the Commonwealth and former Ghurkas), have an oversight of several ongoing transfers from Reserves to the Regular service in the Logs branch and have had a bit of an insight into the manning issues. Oh, and had a bimble through the fridges which are significantly bigger than my house and were designed to run on a palletised menu system (adopted from the cruise ships) but which has so far proved impractical.

Not professing to be a Logs branch expert, just a qualified careers adviser.
 
#59
And I bet he knows sweet FA about Chef pilots either!
He'll know as much as other Flying Fish Head chefs . Finding it a piece of cake with tail hook in the Spaghetti and being cheesed off on Navex's and flying Kipper Kites
 
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