Life in the 1500's

The_Caretaker

War Hero
The next time you're washing yourself and complain that the water temperature isn't to your liking, think how it was for the unfortunate people living in the 1500s.

Most people married in June because they took their yearly bath in May and still smelled pretty good in June. However, they were starting to smell so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom of carrying a bouquet when getting married.

Baths consisted of a big tub filled with hot water. The man of the house had the privilege of the nice clean water, then all the sons and other men, then the women, and finally the children - last of all the babies. By then, the water was so dirty you could actually lose someone in it; hence the saying, "don't throw the baby out with the bath water."

Houses had thatched roofs; thick straw, piled high, with no wood underneath. It was the only place for animals to get warm, so all the dogs, cats and other small animals (mice, rats, and bugs) lived in the roof. When it rained, it became slippery and sometimes the animals would slip and fall off the roof; hence the saying "it's raining cats and dogs." There was nothing to stop things from falling into the house. This was a real problem in the bedroom, where bugs and other droppings could really mess up your nice clean bed. A bed with big posts and a sheet over the top afforded some protection. That's how canopy beds came into existence.

The floor was dirt. Only the wealthy had something other than dirt; hence the saying, "dirt poor."

The wealthy had slate floors that would get slippery in the winter when wet, so they spread thresh on the floor to help their footing. As the winter wore on, they kept adding more thresh until it would all start slipping outside when you opened the door. A piece of wood was placed in the entranceway, a "thresh hold."

In those days people cooked in the kitchen with a big kettle that always hung over the fire. Every day they lit the fire and added things to the pot. They ate mostly vegetables and did not get much meat. They would eat the stew for dinner, leaving leftovers in the pot to get cold overnight, then start over the next day. Sometimes the stew had food in it that had been there for quite a while; hence the rhyme, "peas porridge hot, peas porridge cold, peas porridge in the pot nine days old."

Sometimes they could obtain pork, which was quite special. When visitors came over, they would hang up their bacon to show off. It was a sign of wealth that a man "could bring home the bacon." They would cut off a little to share with guests and would all sit around and "chew the fat."

Those with money had plates made of pewter. Food with a high acid content caused some of the lead to leach onto the food, causing lead poisoning and death. This happened most often with tomatoes, so for the next 400 years or so, tomatoes were considered poisonous.

Most people did not have pewter plates, but had trenchers, a piece of wood with the middle scooped out like a bowl. Often trenchers were made from stale bread which was so old and hard that it could be used for quite some time. Trenchers were never washed. Sometimes worms and mold got into the wood and old bread. After eating off wormy, moldy trenchers, one would get "trench mouth."

Bread was divided according to status. Workers got the burned bottom of the loaf, the family got the middle, and guests got the top, or "upper crust."
Lead cups were used to drink ale or whiskey. The combination would sometimes knock people out for a couple of days. Someone walking along the road would take them for dead and prepare them for burial. They were laid out on the kitchen table for a couple of days and the family would gather around and eat and drink and wait and see if they would wake up; hence the custom of holding a "wake."

England is old and small, and they started running out of places to bury people. So they would dig up coffins and take the bones to a "bone house" and reuse the grave. When reopening these coffins, 1 out of 25 were found to have scratch marks on the inside, and they realized they had been burying people alive. So they would tie a string on the wrist of the corpse, lead it through the coffin and up through the ground, and tie it to a bell. Someone would have to sit out in the graveyard all night (the "graveyard shift") to listen for the bell; thus someone could be "saved by the bell" or was considered a "dead ringer."

And that's the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth...whoever said history was boring?
 

Standard_Bearer

Lantern Swinger
The rich people would eat game birds and the servants would eat the innards (humbles). Hence you are said to be eating humble pie if you apologise!
 
flippin' 'eck - if you think they had it bad you should 'ave grown up in Burnley in the 1950s ... grown up I was dragged up ... dragged, luxury we ... [stumbles off into a corner showing her age (tee hee) ]
:lol:
 

dhobyitch

Lantern Swinger
The_Caretaker said:
The next time you're washing yourself and complain that the water temperature isn't to your liking, think how it was for the unfortunate people living in the 1500s.

Most people married in June because they took their yearly bath in May and still smelled pretty good in June. However, they were starting to smell so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom of carrying a bouquet when getting married.

Not much changed in HM Submarines then.
 
The_Caretaker said:
After eating off wormy, moldy trenchers, one would get "trench mouth."
If the disease was to do with trenchers, it would be called "trencher mouth". It is, in fact, acute necrotizing ulcerative gingivitis or Vincent's Disease, and because many soldiers serving in the trenches in the First World War contracted it, it was called "trench mouth". History is fascinating, especially if you get the facts right. :roll:
 

FlagWagger

GCM
Book Reviewer
dhobyitch said:
The_Caretaker said:
The next time you're washing yourself and complain that the water temperature isn't to your liking, think how it was for the unfortunate people living in the 1500s.

Most people married in June because they took their yearly bath in May and still smelled pretty good in June. However, they were starting to smell so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom of carrying a bouquet when getting married.
Not much changed in HM Submarines then.
So is flower arranging an adqual for sludgemariners or is it sufficent just to carry a bouquet? :)
 

polariod

Lantern Swinger
"So is flower arranging an adqual for sludgemariners or is sufficent just to carry a bouquet?"

Ask your old man and tell him I said you were to ask. :eek: :eek: :eek: :wink:

Pol
 

dhobyitch

Lantern Swinger
FlagWagger said:
dhobyitch said:
The_Caretaker said:
The next time you're washing yourself and complain that the water temperature isn't to your liking, think how it was for the unfortunate people living in the 1500s.

Most people married in June because they took their yearly bath in May and still smelled pretty good in June. However, they were starting to smell so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom of carrying a bouquet when getting married.
Not much changed in HM Submarines then.
So is flower arranging an adqual for sludgemariners or is it sufficent just to carry a bouquet? :)
Like i said FL not much change.
 

NZ_Bootneck

War Hero
dhobyitch said:
The_Caretaker said:
The next time you're washing yourself and complain that the water temperature isn't to your liking, think how it was for the unfortunate people living in the 1500s.

Most people married in June because they took their yearly bath in May and still smelled pretty good in June. However, they were starting to smell so brides carried a bouquet of flowers to hide the body odor. Hence the custom of carrying a bouquet when getting married.

Not much changed in HM Submarines then.
So grooms from HM Submarines carry bouquets, nice. :lol:
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
MoD_RSS New £3.3 million fund to give babies from deprived areas or BAME backgrounds the best start in life MoD News 0
Dredd Light of life Blue Jokes 0
MoD_RSS UK scientists help NASA answers the questions, 'was there life on Mars?' MoD News 1
MoD_RSS Do you need to leave your home area to achieve a better life? MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Government backed projects to speed up life-saving cancer diagnoses MoD News 0
G Life on aircraft carriers and suitability assessment Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting 3
C Life on a submarine? Joining the Royal Navy 18
MoD_RSS Life cover for frontline health workers MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Committee on Standards in Public Life announces review of electoral regulation MoD News 0
MoD_RSS £22 million awarded to life-saving health charities during virus outbreak MoD News 0
MoD_RSS DFID support for partners to deliver life-saving programmes MoD News 0
O Buying Life Insurance before joining... Finance & Pensions 17
MoD_RSS MHRA approves new life-saving breathing aid to help keep coronavirus (COVID-19) patients out of intensive care MoD News 0
C Life at worthy down as a RFA chef apprentice RFA 12
MoD_RSS Life on marsh in A585 bypass exhibition MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Adding years to life and life to years: our plan to increase healthy longevity MoD News 0
R Pilot shore life, sea life and family life Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting 7
MoD_RSS Intimidation in Public Life: letters from Twitter MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Intimidation in Public Life: letters from Facebook MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Intimidation in Public Life: letters from Google MoD News 0
MoD_RSS New funding scheme supports purchase of life-saving safety equipment for fishermen MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Driving complacency: 74% of drivers would risk life in flood water MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Kingdom Life Ministries inquiry: Charity trustees disqualified after unauthorised payments of over £450k and cash withdrawals of over £700k MoD News 0
soleil Mail: "Real-Life 'Rocket Man' Wearing A Jet Pack Launches From ... HMS Queen Elizabeth" The Fleet 8
MoD_RSS Intimidation in Public Life: Letter to political parties on election pledge MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Update on tackling intimidation in public life MoD News 0
MoD_RSS The Principles of Public Life: 25 years MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Letter from the Committee on Standards in Public Life to public office holders MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Correspondence between the Prime Minister and the Committee on Standards in Public Life MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Life Sciences and UK's future role: Sir John Bell delivers MHRA annual lecture MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Open letter from the Committee on Standards in Public Life to all public office holders MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Supporting healthy and active later life: apply for funding MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Celebrating life at BPDTS MoD News 0
Bad CO Real Life Getting In the Way Site Issues 82
MoD_RSS Britannia Protects the Waves: £7m extra funding to protect UK marine life MoD News 0
MoD_RSS UK aid to provide life-saving support for up to one million people crippled by drought in Somalia MoD News 0
MoD_RSS UK to innovate new life-saving treatment and diagnosis technology MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Life in the UK test contract awarded MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Life-saving fund opens for bids MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Physical activity helps children to deal with life’s challenges MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Specialist life vests to improve fishing safety MoD News 0
B Navy life Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting 6
MoD_RSS Press release: Over five million Afghans to receive emergency life-saving UK aid MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: England's Marine Life Protected With Blue Belt Expansion MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Consumer, Retail and Life Sciences Business Council: 28 May 2019 MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: Competition will breathe new life into an old Pacer train MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Norwich river given new lease of life MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: Every life matters MoD News 0
MoD_RSS Press release: Intimidation in Public Life: a joint approach to tackling intimidation MoD News 0
MoD_RSS News story: Life-saving fund gets £1 million boost MoD News 0
Similar threads


















































Top