LCpl Justin Thomas CGC, 40 Cdo on the radio tomorrow

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by northernsoulboy, Nov 22, 2007.

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  1. Major declaration of interest: I wrote this book so pls bear that in mind.
    Mods - if this is an inappropriate post, pls delete.

    The above LCpl is one of 25 medal winners I interviewed for the book In Foreign Fields.

    (There are two other Marines in the book - CSgt Matt Tomlinson CGC and Maj Mark Hammond DFC. Bit more info here)

    Justin is on the Simon Mayo show on BBC Five Live tomorrow afternoon (2.30pmish) talking about the action which led to his award (it happened during Op James at Abu Al Khasib).

    While obviously wary of overly promoting the book side of things, I felt this would be of interest to ex, serving and future RM personnel and that, on balance, I could probably post up about it.

    As I say, if perceived to be overly commercial please just delete.

    rgds

    Dan Collins
     
  2. wet_blobby

    wet_blobby War Hero Moderator

    Cracking phot on the front cover of your book mate, well done and thank you for writing a book and highlighting what the lads today are going through.
     
  3. Thanks Wet Blobby
    That pic on the front cover actually shows Royal Marines from 42 Cdo in action in Afghanistan; astonishing is the only word I have for it.
    Anyone interested in listening to Justin Thomas (or the Army bloke Major Justin Featherstone MC) can go here and download it on a podcast (whatever they are).
    I was struck but not surprised by how modest Justin Thomas was. Given what he did, he was talking about it like it was a walk in the park.
    But he got up onto an open Pinzgauer and used the rear GPMG to return fire to an estimated 200 enemy troops who were dug in, well-hidden and using mortars, RPGs, machine guns and anti-tank weapons to pin down and obviously try to kill him and the rest of his troop.
    He was up there for an estimated 15 minutes, obviously very exposed - in fact, the only visible target. When one of his colleagues - Marine Gary Lancaster - joined him, to feed his ammo belts to him, one RPG actually passed between the two of them, which gives you some idea of how much danger they had put themselves in.
    Their actions enabled the rest of their troop to come back into the fight and eventually defeat the numerically far superior enemy.
    I suppose that's what the Royal Marines do, but to a civilian like me it was very impressive stuff.
    For anyone interested, there's a few more details about the various people in the book, including Matt Tomlinson and Mark Hammond (both RM) here.
    cheers
    Dan
     

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