Last Falklands warship bows out

Discussion in 'Current Affairs' started by dunkers, May 27, 2009.

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  1. The end of an era...and a reminder (if we ever needed one) as to how much older many of us are getting.... :wink:
     
  2. pity ships aren't de/commissioned one for one. how many ships is a 45 replacing?
     
  3. Levers_Aligned

    Levers_Aligned War Hero Moderator

    Just been. T'was tres sad. I was there when D89's White Ensign was first raised as well.

    levers
     
  4. my dad served on her during the 80's and only ever has good things to say about his time on board. 'tis sad to see her go.
     
  5. Sadly all old ships have to go eventually. I'm not looking forward to Manchester going, however these ships have served us well, time for the RN to re-equip with more modern and better fitted ships.
     
  6. I enjoyed serving on the Gleaming G and the Geordie Gunboat. Stumpies were good drafts in my experience :D
     
  7. I'm sorry to sound so wet, but it feels to me like we are losing something more significant than just a ship here. HMS Exeter was commissioned long before I was born; which makes me a mere sprog but even so it seems to me we are seeing the navy we once had fade away. A different navy. The new 45's, somehow, don't seem to be quite of the same force that HMS Exeter was.
     
  8. Or for that matter, the old type 15's....time and tide wait for no ex matelot, or 'old ship's either.... :(
     
  9. Levers_Aligned

    Levers_Aligned War Hero Moderator

    Nah. Disagree entirely. It might sound 'party line' but Exeter is way over the horizon in terms of capability and relevance in today's Navy. I have spent my time on Type 42s, Counties, Tribals, Carriers and others. I recently went up to Scotland to see the Type 45s being brought on line, set to work and, over at Scotstoun, built from plate steel upwards. They are magnificent pieces of machinery. Okay, some are suffering setbacks, but this isn't McClaren Racing where you have a test track and labratories to get it right before you pull of the canvas. Give it five years and you'll see how good these ships really are. I have fond memories of my time on my five Type 42s, but squashing 270-odd into a tiny, obsolete ship with antiquated machinery and systems isn't the way to leap into the future. Exeter was brand new when we boarded her in 1980 and the future was exciting ... and it is no less exciting with these new ships arriving in the fleet.

    If any of you haven't had the chance to go and walk round the 45s yet, I encourage you to do so. The space, facilities and equipment are impressive, as is the accomodation. If I hear any junior ratings dripping on there, I will happily twat them.

    levers
     
  10. Yes I remember early one morning as we were closed up on Fearless the reports on Exeter taking out a couple of high flying Argentinian aircraft. Since then I have always kept an eye on what the Ships around us at that time were now up to.
    On a different note the work on the Carrier advances & currently the 'bow' or some other section is gradually appearing in a field near me for trials of 'systems'.
     
  11. Says it all for me.

    There will no doubt be another HMS Exeter, in what form or role who knows, only the vessel has gone, the name will live on in hearts and minds.
     
  12. I watched the 'Dart rising from San Carlos and into the blue, you could actually see the high-level interecept and bits of 'plane dropping back towards the origin of the 'Dart.

    That is my only memory of Exeter but it has always remained fresh.
     

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