Lack Of Recognition For RN/RNR

Discussion in 'Royal Naval Reserve (RNR)' started by hookyh, Mar 29, 2008.

Welcome to the Navy Net aka Rum Ration

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial RN website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Is there anyone out there who agrees with me that there is a general lack of recognition/appreciation for the endeavours of the RN/RNR from those above? It's become increasingly notable to me that over the years there have been considerably less names put forward by the 'senior service' for rewards generally. I'm talking about recognition for bravery as well as long-term commited service, over and above the call. For instance the Marines who strapped themselves to an Apache being disgustingly overlooked for medals by their superiors for what were incredibly brave acts (despite earning themselves eternal legendary status within the corps) right down to the individuals within the RNR who constantly put themselves forward in support of the fleet, particularly at junior rate level, who never recieve as much as a sniff from Commarres/Dnres when it comes to more than a verbal 'well done' on visiting units. I realise that none (or very few) join for medals, but surely it's high time the RNR started seeing recognition for it's most commited individuals, not just those at Warrant Officer and above. There are too many people in our organisation whose morale is low at present, particularly individuals who have served two or more mobilised tours in the last four or five years. My thinking is that if we were to see individual endeavour rewarded, especially to those with long, distinguished service at junior level, it would give a lift to the service in general to see that the highest levels of the organisation don't just look after their own, but also look after and recognise the lower levels who are making them look good, for instance those mobilised within FPGRM who are dramatically improving the RNR profile and image. I have personally noted the performance of individuals for years who have never had so much as a nod in their direction from above. Anyone got any thoughts on this?
  2. Well said! Certainly deserves it!

    Bloody well done Bootneck!!!!!
  3. When you consider that the first VC awarded to any one was for a mid who picked a burning bomb up off the deck and threw it overboard this qulifies several times over. But to get back to the original thread.

    I will declare an intrest here. I have letters after my name, RD, and am proud to have them. I expect and will not receive any more. When the RD and LSGC medal, along with the TD and the airforce's bottle top were abolished they were replaced by the new tri service awards. Namely the squashed easter egg and the QVRM. It was explaned that this would be similar to the Queen's Police Medal. Well, call me Mr Picky but every time I see a Senior Police Officer on TV, Chiel Inspector or above, they seems to have one. How many Lt Cdrs have a QVRM? Not many. The Birthday Honours and New Year Honours lists some times have one or two or none awarded. This is all the more galling when you see Sea Cadet Officers getting MBEs. I do not decry those awards but at least Joe Public has a better understanding of what the Order of the British Empire is. The QRVM was never intended to be an OBE replacement so why has it become one? Besides, have you seen one? Who would honestly want to wear it any way.

    To conclude, Personally I could not give a stuff, I am proud of my RD of course. I have all the recognition I would ever desire in the form af an engraved hip flask presented by "the Lads" out of their own pockets. But so long as road sweepers, postmen and dustmen get MBEs and teachers get Knighted for teaching (all for doing their principle jobs),I will be angry to see Volenteer Reserves miss out on the same awards.
  4. Pardon my ignorance, but what does "RD" mean?
  5. Reserve Decoration, awarded to RNR officers for 15 years' service, and now replaced by the VRSM.

    I believe our (i.e. DI & mine) last CO has one, & if I'm around long enough & am lucky enough to get one, I'd wear it. Is the lack of awards due to people not being put forward, or does it not work like that?

  6. RD = Reserve Decoration

  7. I'm an old fart with an RD but I'm not that bloody old!!!!
  8. Listen chaps if you do the time/jobs I'm sure you'll be suitably recognised. The young man who fell on a grenade to save his comrades undoubtedly deserves the highest recognition. However to those you who limit contribution to a 2 week summer sojourn in Gibraltar/Cyprus, where your greatest challenge is to demonstrate your ability to recite in full Rick Jolly's "Jack Speak" in the Wardroom Bar, I'm sorry but your appeals for recognition are similar to those of Dick Dastarldy's compatriot - Mutley. Before you all respond with genuine war stories - I fully recognise that vast numbers of reservists have completed numerous arduous and dangerous tours in Operational Theatres - but for those of you who haven't - that's why you don't have the relevant campaign medals - so what are you expecting.
  9. I think there was a lack of recognition for the RNR/RMR and there probably still is.

    Part of the problem is the way the system works (or used to). Firstly, the home base or training centre has to submit a list of all those deserving cases who are recommended for any particular award - not just for bravery but for genuine "public service" cases as well. This list is then slowly pushed upwards until the final awards are made and of course there are limited numbers of OBE/MBEs available so decisions are made and people are inevtably disappointed.

    When someone is training away from their home unit I can see that the difficulty is compounded as you sart to get different COs etc. having to make the initial recommendations and deal with the limited numbers of awards available.

    I do agree that it seems wrong that while a school dinner lady or kid's crossing lolipop lady quite rightly gets an award for years of puplic service , the loyal RNR Senior Rate who turned up every drill night, did his weekends and annual training for years (even getting Extensions of Service when needed) rarely gets a look in. At least we got the RD!

  10. janner

    janner War Hero Book Reviewer

    If you ask nicely you may get to borrow some of these

    Audie Murphy, little 5'5" tall 110 pound guy from Texas who played cowboy parts. Most Decorated serviceman of WWII and earned: Medal of Honor, Distinguished Service Cross, 2 Silver Star Medals, Legion of Merit, 2 Bronze Star Medals with "V", 2 Purple Hearts, U.S. Army Outstanding Civilian Service Medal, Good Conduct Medal, 2 Distinguished Unit Emblems, American Campaign Medal, European-African- Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with One Silver Star, Four Bronze Service Stars (representing nine campaigns) and one Bronze Arrowhead (representing assault landing at Sicily and Southern France) World War II Victory Medal Army of Occupation Medal with Germany Clasp, Armed Forces Reserve Medal, Combat Infantry Badge, Marksman Badge with Rifle Bar, Expert Badge with Bayonet Bar, French Fourragere in Colors of the Croix de Guerre, French Legion of Honor, Grade of Chevalier, French Croix de Guerre With Silver Star, French Croix de Guerre with Palm, Medal of Liberated France, Belgian Croix de Guerre 1940 Palm.
  11. Having spent some time working with REME Aviation I can vouch that the Army knows how to fill in award forms well. In a group of 30 SNCO's and WO's together with the same number of ex Army civvies there where at least 4 MBE's for services to the Corp. Thats well above national average.

    What I can't understand is that if the RD is a Reserve Decoration then why is it restricted to Officers. Surley it should be called the Reserve Officer Decoration (ROD).

    lets face it the only ones that really count are the campaign medals and bravery. MBE and OBE lost their worth when pop stars and footballers started getting them. and don't start me on Knighthoods for rowers. 3 things to remember 1.boat goes in water, 2.rower goes in boat. 3. Rower Rows boat. They don't even steer it in some of the races.
  12. Why not institute a badge to be awarded after every 4 years of service, provided a record of good conduct is maintained. We could call it the BADGE for GOOD CONDUCT, or BCG for short. After 14 years of Good Conduct and long service, a GCLSM could be awarded.

    Hang on a minute...................................................
  13. Just to clarify my original point (and reason for starting this thread), i would agree wholeheartedly that many who do no more than their drills and fortnights each year should get no more than they are entitled to, however it has become very, VERY noticeable that within the Navy (especially the RNR) there is a distinct lack of names on lists when it comes to honours. My one serious gripe is that it has become clear over the years that there is a distinct apathy amongst C.O.'s and senior officers within the RNR especially, to recognise in anything more than verbal terms the contributions of outstanding individuals who have gone well beyond that which is expected of them, in terms of efforts within their individual units and within the navy in general on operations etc..... Certainly it would seem that generally (for instance) once mobilised a rating becomes forgotten about by their units until they return and once they do it's rarely noticed that they are back. I would admit that some units are better than others in this respect.

    Surely in this day and age where servicemen and women are largely ignored by the government and the public in the most apathetic manner, it becomes more important to recognise the contribution made by the services. As mentioned the Army seem to find it considerably easier to hunt down the appropriate forms and ensure that their people are recommended for awards, but in all the years i've been in i've only known three people who have been awarded anything out of the ordinary. (1 x CPO, 1 x WO & 1 Officer). This is a truly pathetic haul for an organisation that puts in so much with so few people in relative terms.

    Come on head shed, we should be making a point of saying to the country 'Look at the quality of the people who serve you'. Surely it would be a huge morale boost to know that those who go beyond the call will be appreciated at some stage in their careers.

    I would add that i don't personally do the job for medals, i do it out of patriotic pride, but it sickens me to see people do things which really make a difference, only to see their efforts ignored by those above. Surely the apathy of the country towards us isn't just a mirror of the attitude of those above us (Or is it?).
  14. The RD was for officers, ratings got a Reserve LSGC medal. Now all ranks and rates get the new medal after 10 years. Yes you are correct two badges then a medal then the third badge, insanity!

    And to go back to my original point. Does any one know of a reservist getting an OBE etc since the QVRM was introduced. Quite frankly it should be consigned to the gash bin and an OBE/MBE awarded in its place.

    Incedentaly I am quite proud of my pair of medals they are the modern equivalent of the pair worn by the Captain of Titanic! (Thanks for the pic, but modern ones have a silver border to the ribbon and the cypher is EiiR. The original plain green ribbon did not stand out on a navy blue uniform.)
  15. Deckhead yes, but if you are not an officer your chances of receiving a QVRN is pretty slim. I don’t think Richard W Wilson is complaining he received both OBE QVRM

    ‘A spontaneous website put together by his many friends in the Territorial Army to celebrate the twin honours bestowed upon him today by her Most Excellent Britannic Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, namely the OBE and the QVRM’

    Here is one happy lady who is not turning her nose up at receiving the QVRM two weeks ago.

    ‘Commander Sue Eagles Royal Naval Reserve was decorated with the Queen’s Volunteer Reserves Medal (QVRM) by HRH the Prince of Wales at Buckingham Palace on 19 March 2008.......................Sue who works for the Directorate of Media and Communications in the Ministry of Defence also holds the Reserve Decoration, the Queen’s Golden Jubilee Medal and the Afghanistan Campaign Medal.’

    The QVRM is thought so highly of, the recipients ( all commissioned officers & NCO's) have started a newsletter on the medal.

    Congratulation to those who were awarded the QVRM in the QBH in June 2004. These
    recipients are not yet on the website so are listed below.
    WO2 John Aitchison QVRM AGC(SPS)(V) as WO2 RAOWO at 101(N) Regt RA (V)
    Col Oliver Chamberlain QVRM TD RY as Deputy Bde Comd 43 (Wessex) Bde
    Sqn Ldr Gus Launder QVRM as Officer Commanding 2625 Sqn RAuxAF
    Col Julian Radcliffe OBE QVRM TD RY as Col Reserves DASD
    Lt Cdr Susan Sides QVRM RNR as Lt Cdr HMS King Alfred
    C/Sgt Mick Warren QVRM PWRR (V) as C/Sgt RRTT 3rd Bn PWRR’ QVRM Newsletter Nov 04.pdf.
  16. There is an interesting disparity between the split between the ranks in the RNR/RMR.

    Navy - 12 awards, 2 SRs
    Marines - 5 awards, 2 officers

    Yes, you're right, I do have too much time on my hands.

    Edited to add... I think the criteria lends itself to much discussion (taken from

    "It is ordained that the Medal shall be awarded only to those who, being members of any rank of Our Volunteer Reserve Forces, shall have rendered such devotion to duty and exemplary service over a period usually of at least 10 years in and to Our said Volunteer Reserve Forces as shall have been of particular value to Our said Forces and constituted an outstanding example to others, and that such awards shall only be made on the recommendation of Our Secretary of State for Defence."

    The kind of people I think fit that bill are rarely the kind who seem to receive it.

  17. God and the Navy we adore in times of trouble and not before!!!!!!!

Share This Page