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LAC training and life at sea

tfree

Newbie
I have just got my start date through for my 10 weeks at Raleigh, I have applied as aircraft controller.

I was just wondering after my basic training how is time split during professional training; how much of my time will be spent at sea?

If anyone has any experience in the role and could give me some more information on the role and any experiences they have had that isn't on the information sheet for the role I would love to hear about it so I have a bit more information before I go in!
 
I have just got my start date through for my 10 weeks at Raleigh, I have applied as aircraft controller.

I was just wondering after my basic training how is time split during professional training; how much of my time will be spent at sea?

If anyone has any experience in the role and could give me some more information on the role and any experiences they have had that isn't on the information sheet for the role I would love to hear about it so I have a bit more information before I go in!
@Alphacharlie is your man but I don't know if he is still paying attention. You could also put Aircraft Controller in the search box(top right hand corner) as I am sure your questions have been asked before.
 
@Alphacharlie is your man but I don't know if he is still paying attention. You could also put Aircraft Controller in the search box(top right hand corner) as I am sure your questions have been asked before.
Hi thanks for the response! I have had a look but everything on the search bar I have found on the search bar seems to be from a number of years ago and from what I have read things have changed a fair bit since them!
 
For training;
After basic, 4/5 months at Collingwood doing an AWT course (you'll technically be deployable as an AWT if you don't pass AC course(a lot don't)).
Then 4 months at Yeovilton learning non- tactical control procedures (controlled approaches/ emergency low vis approaches/emergencies etc.)
Then a further 4/5 months back at Collingwood learning tactical control.
1 month on LRLC
Finally, out to a ship to complete taskbooks.
That's as much as I'm aware at the moment, half way through training myself so can't help with the life at sea I'm afraid!
 
For training;
After basic, 4/5 months at Collingwood doing an AWT course (you'll technically be deployable as an AWT if you don't pass AC course(a lot don't)).
Then 4 months at Yeovilton learning non- tactical control procedures (controlled approaches/ emergency low vis approaches/emergencies etc.)
Then a further 4/5 months back at Collingwood learning tactical control.
1 month on LRLC
Finally, out to a ship to complete taskbooks.
That's as much as I'm aware at the moment, half way through training myself so can't help with the life at sea I'm afraid!
So you’ll be on centre line - on glide path!!
Are you visual with the runway - sorry, end of course???
 
So you’ll be on centre line - on glide path!!
Are you visual with the runway - sorry, end of course???
All our instructors have said it's pretty much broadcast control and visual approaches when on ship. Can't hurt to know the ins and outs just in case though :p
 
So, no controlled approaches??
My thoughts exactly.
Imagine coming back to mother in fog, down to MLA and no AC to bring you back via PVA!!
Frightening!!
I hope the OP means he is a supernumerary and another 'qualified' AC is on hand to take an aircraft under full control!

Dit time!
We, (Wasp, Pilot and Acmn), were recalled to the ship down south. She was in Stanley harbour underway. We took off from Murray Heights straight into no vis, cloud on the deck and no forward vis). Requested PVA. It was so bad we couldn't see the flares the ship was throwing into the gin. Ship had a spotlight pointing skywards!! All the flight deck lights were on full brilliance and still not visible. When the HC called can you see the ship we replied we can't even see the sea!!! Scary shit!!!! We did 3 unsuccessful PVA's.
Eventually we came down to ten feet, the HC guided us to cross astern to pick up the wake. Once we were visual with the wake we followed it at a very slow speed until we saw the stern. Climbed to get above the flight deck, (keeping the ship in sight), and cautiously moved over the deck to land on.
The deck crew then removed the tv aerials we had collected on the undercarriage as we skimmed over the houses of Stanley!!!!!
The skipper, (ex submariner) invited the boss and myself to a long stiff one in his cabin which we gratefully scuppered in quick time. If our HC/AC hadn't been so switched on they could have been pulling us out of the harbour. We couldn't go back ashore because we wouldn't have found it!!! There were still active mine fields around Stanley then!!!
Bloody scary.
 
My thoughts exactly.
Imagine coming back to mother in fog, down to MLA and no AC to bring you back via PVA!!
Frightening!!
I hope the OP means he is a supernumerary and another 'qualified' AC is on hand to take an aircraft under full control!

Dit time!
We, (Wasp, Pilot and Acmn), were recalled to the ship down south. She was in Stanley harbour underway. We took off from Murray Heights straight into no vis, cloud on the deck and no forward vis). Requested PVA. It was so bad we couldn't see the flares the ship was throwing into the gin. Ship had a spotlight pointing skywards!! All the flight deck lights were on full brilliance and still not visible. When the HC called can you see the ship we replied we can't even see the sea!!! Scary shit!!!! We did 3 unsuccessful PVA's.
Eventually we came down to ten feet, the HC guided us to cross astern to pick up the wake. Once we were visual with the wake we followed it at a very slow speed until we saw the stern. Climbed to get above the flight deck, (keeping the ship in sight), and cautiously moved over the deck to land on.
The deck crew then removed the tv aerials we had collected on the undercarriage as we skimmed over the houses of Stanley!!!!!
The skipper, (ex submariner) invited the boss and myself to a long stiff one in his cabin which we gratefully scuppered in quick time. If our HC/AC hadn't been so switched on they could have been pulling us out of the harbour. We couldn't go back ashore because we wouldn't have found it!!! There were still active mine fields around Stanley then!!!
Bloody scary.
Had the same during the Gulf conflict due to sand storms. Emergency Low Viz Approaches (as they were called in my time) were greatly received by the aircrew.

Had beers paid for many a time by the aircrew.
 

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