Just done PRNC and have joining date, but have doubts too

Misspiggy

Newbie
I've just done my PRNC and it took me way out of my comfort zone, which I know is to be expected. Are they as horrible to you at Raleigh??!! Or is the PRNC to sort the men from the boys...
 
RALEIGH is only a couple of months, and everyone I've met is proud to have for it.

If in doubt, just keep going to the next meal, and forget the "big picture".
 

Alfacharlie

War Hero
Going by the other thread about life as an AC, I’m not sure what you’re expecting from a life in the RN? It’s not all rainbows.
 

SONAR-BENDER

War Hero
Misspiggy - reading this and your other post, you are coming across as a bit 'precious'. Comfort zone FFS? You'll be getting pushed hard, but you'll cope. Inless you just give in.

You are about to enter the Armed Forces. The ethos is 'Train hard, Fight easy'. All it takes is to do what people say for a few weeks - it isn't that difficult. Thousands have done it before.

Re the AC thing - how do you imagine aircraft are tracked? I'll give you a clue - by radar, which can involve the operator sitting at a computer screen for several hours in a darkened room. Think playing a computer game in your bedroom all weekend.......
 

Misspiggy

Newbie
Thanks for your replies. For someone who's not yet in the Navy, yes I'm finding it a bit daunting and am just trying to find out more info from people who have been there and worn the t shirt. I don't mean to come across as precious, sorry, I just figured the best way to get honest replies is for me to be honest too.
 

Drakey

War Hero
I've just done my PRNC and it took me way out of my comfort zone, which I know is to be expected. Are they as horrible to you at Raleigh??!! Or is the PRNC to sort the men from the boys...
They will be horrible to you at Raleigh. If you found the PRNC to be unpleasant, perhaps the real thing isn't for you.
 

Waspie

War Hero
After reading both your posts you seem to have a suitcase full of doubts about what you're letting your self in for.
Going off tack for a second I watched an army recruitment prog on the tv the other day. A female was handed an SA80 rifle and burst into tears when told it was a tool to kill! She hadn't obviously done her homework. The job of the armed forces can include killing! It's part of the role. Either directly, firing the actual weapon or, indirectly. Directing an aircraft to its tactical objective which may mean weapon release and again, killing.
So. its healthy having doubts, training is hard, it's meant to be. It will push you to do things outside your normal comfort zone. However, rest assured, thousands have been where you are now. If you talk to them, (us), we will all tell you it was an experience we wouldn't change. Most would do it all again.
Carry on asking questions, it's how we discover what is right or wrong for us.
Whatever you do make sure the job you finally decide on is the one you really want to do. Changing later can be difficult or impossible.
Good luck, stop doubting yourself and choose wisely.
 

Alfacharlie

War Hero
Adding to waspie, direct/ indirect engagement would be your ‘bread and butter’. You will be a weapons director.
Anyway, joking aside, what foot size are you?
 

clonmel

Lantern Swinger
Thanks for your replies. For someone who's not yet in the Navy, yes I'm finding it a bit daunting and am just trying to find out more info from people who have been there and worn the t shirt. I don't mean to come across as precious, sorry, I just figured the best way to get honest replies is for me to be honest too.
For what it's worth, anyone who doesn't tell you that they've had butterflies or goosebumps before joining up is a f***ing liar; it is perfectly natural to have a sense of apprehension about the unknown, something that you know is going to challenge you, and that you really want. Arguably the training system wants you to be a little unsettled, that way they will see how you respond under pressure.

One thing you can guarantee, is that everyone else in your intake will be feeling exactly the same way. Some will be better at putting a brave face on it, but they will all be feeling the same way.

I've been in 28 years and completed, ahem, one or two courses (some with a high failure rate) and my advice would be to go, and give it your very very best shot. Everyone respects a trier, no-one likes a quitter.
 

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