Joining the navy with Aspergers Syndrone (Autism)?

#21
IB08 said:
Id say dont mention it on your forms, if its not severe they are not going to notice it anyway. Youll get better at socialising after youve been in for a while, you are probably just a slightly awkward young man.
If they find out that you have lied during the selection process YOU WILL be thrown out.

SM

:)
 

IB08

Lantern Swinger
#22
I personally have never lied on any application form. But in this guys case, it might be a wise choice of action if he is going to be forbidden ever to join anyway. Aspergers is a load of b*llocks, Im convinced most people with aspergers just find it hard to socialise. That is not autism ffs, they are just a bit shy.
 
#23
supermario said:
IB08 said:
Id say dont mention it on your forms, if its not severe they are not going to notice it anyway. Youll get better at socialising after youve been in for a while, you are probably just a slightly awkward young man.
If they find out that you have lied during the selection process YOU WILL be thrown out.

SM

:)
Also bear in mind Andy, that there are careers staff and other officials on this site. In 2 mins I have a picture on you From Blackburn, going to Preston Uni, Potential Knife crime/offence, Potential Aspergers/Autism. It will be easy for people to catch you out!!!!

SM

:roll:
 
#24
IB08 said:
I personally have never lied on any application form. But in this guys case, it might be a wise choice of action if he is going to be forbidden ever to join anyway. Aspergers is a load of b*llocks, Im convinced most people with aspergers just find it hard to socialise. That is not autism ffs, they are just a bit shy.
Aspergers is not autism though there are common aspects, it does vary in the extent it affects people, and whilst the most obvious aspects are social interaction, there are other potential areas of difficulty. It is not life threatening but for the person with it they do have to work to get the best out of their life. It gives them advantages in some instances over so called normal (and I have already pointed the perception of nermality itself is difficult) people and can excell in some fields, whilst in others they have limited chances of success.

One must always remember the RN medical is not an artificial barrier, it is meant to both project the service from employing a medical liability, and to protect the potential recruit from putting him/her self in a position where they may come to harm, or harm some one else. Particularly these days I do not see them excluding people who are safe to employ.
 
#25
Ok, just got back from the careers office. The chap said that I do have a chance at joining, but the decision is entirely down to the navy doctor. He told me not to get my hopes up.

Good news I guess - at least he didn't tell me I have zero chance of getting in. I'll put in the application and give it a shot. Might aswell I guess...

Also bear in mind Andy, that there are careers staff and other officials on this site. In 2 mins I have a picture on you From Blackburn, going to Preston Uni, Potential Knife crime/offence, Potential Aspergers/Autism. It will be easy for people to catch you out!!!!
Hehe, that case was dismissed btw - turned out the guy was BSing all along, and didn't turn up to court... theres some real nutters in this world :?
 
#26
This site covers a number of misunderstandings. http://www.addandadhd.co.uk/adhd-aspergers-syndrome.html

IB08 makes an interesting point. Aspergeres syndrome was never heard of when I were a lad but I went to school (and cadets) with a few who would probably now qualify for it! It does seem that everybody who’s behaviour is deemed odd must acquire a label, these days. Now I think about it, I would probably qualify for some of those labels if were growing up now, when I would still be just an argumentative and wilful little sod.

Andy, if it's on your Med records, you'd just be p**sing against the wind trying to hide it. Ask your GP to have you professionally assessed. It could save you a lot of misery.
 
#27
Passed-over_Loggie said:
IB08 makes an interesting point. Aspergeres syndrome was never heard of when I were a lad but I went to school (and cadets) with a few who would probably now qualify for it! It does seem that everybody who’s behaviour is deemed odd must acquire a label, these days. Now I think about it, I would probably qualify for some of those labels if were growing up now, when I would still be just an argumentative and wilful little sod.
quote]

I would agree, but having found out a fair bit more about it in recent years I can now identify it with 'strange' behaviour in some people I have known, all stranglely pure mathematitians and holding down serious jobs. On the other hand I have equally know quite a few pure mathematitians who do not exhibit such tendencies, though aspergers and pure maths and computer programming (in many ways an ofshoot of pure maths) go well together, providing a very creative and often rewarding outlet for those with aspergers.
 
#28
Asperger is a very mild form of autistic spectrum disorder. If the AFCO need specialist advice I suggest they contact Professor Simon Baron-Cohen at the Autism Research Centre in Cambridge. Details below.

http://www.autismresearchcentre.com/arc/staff_member.asp?id=33

In the past this diagnosis would not have been a problem as Asperger syndrome shares many characteristics with Klinefelter syndrome and I know of at least one serving officer in the RN with this condition and an oppo who served as a Stoker, man and boy.
 
#29
Sapphire said:
Unfortunately today, schools are only too keen to label 'awkward' children if only to get them off their statistics. However, having met a few, and I have to say mostley boys, with aspergers syndrome there is more than an inability to socialise with those in their peer group. They can be unable to cope with new situations, sometimes slavishly following the same routine, prone to irrational behaviour or an irrational response to something you and I would not. Quite often they are those who are only happy being by themselves.
I don't know what the criteria are for being labeled with this but usually those who do and are accepted for it are because those around them compensate for their behaviour.
:oops: I didn't realise we'd met! 8O :D
 
#31
Sapphire said:
Unfortunately today, schools are only too keen to label 'awkward' children if only to get them off their statistics. However, having met a few, and I have to say mostley boys, with aspergers syndrome there is more than an inability to socialise with those in their peer group. They can be unable to cope with new situations, sometimes slavishly following the same routine, prone to irrational behaviour or an irrational response to something you and I would not. Quite often they are those who are only happy being by themselves.
I don't know what the criteria are for being labeled with this but usually those who do and are accepted for it are because those around them compensate for their behaviour.
Whilst I would whole heartedly agree that the current process of pidgeon holing the difficult to meet meanigless targets has great potential for social damage for some people, I equally find your summation of aspergers a result of that process. I covers a quite wide range of behaviours, not the simple few you used to pidgeon hole them, and does not mean in any way that most do not lead what we would call normal lives. Now I happen to be very keen on routine, but I put that down much more to spending a few of my formative years in the hands of the Andrew as I do not exhibit any other aspects of aspergers. As the application of logic is a very strong aspergers characteristic I would suggest that rather than being irrational that they expose the irrationality and lack of logic in 'normal' behaviour.
 
#32
Sapphire said:
Unfortunately today, schools are only too keen to label 'awkward' children if only to get them off their statistics. However, having met a few, and I have to say mostley boys, with aspergers syndrome there is more than an inability to socialise with those in their peer group. They can be unable to cope with new situations, sometimes slavishly following the same routine, prone to irrational behaviour or an irrational response to something you and I would not. Quite often they are those who are only happy being by themselves.
I don't know what the criteria are for being labeled with this but usually those who do and are accepted for it are because those around them compensate for their behaviour.
That may be true of those with moderate to full-blown Aspergers, but Andy seems to be at the mild end of the spectrum. In his case I shouldn't think that those around around him would be aware of it or feel the need to modify their own behaviour.
 
#34
all_purple_now said:
thingy said:
Asperger syndrome shares many characteristics with Klinefelter syndrome
No it doesn't. Klinefelter's is a genetic disorder. Asperger's isn't.

APN
Asperger is an autistic spectrum disorder which appear to be X linked disorders and may share characteristics with genetic conditions where there is social-communication disorder, which appears to be associated with incomplete Lyon X-inactivation in X-diploidy. I was involved in research several years ago with Professor Baron-Cohen to see if KS men had Asperger. The data suggested not but there were certainly similarities and KS men who have had a diagnosis of Asperger exhibit behavioural traits that can be confused with or appear indistinguishable to, Klinefelter syndrome, especially with the less common karyotypes such as XXYY, XXXY & XXXXY.
 
A

angrydoc

Guest
#35
Don't fall into the Daily Express trap of putting too much weight behind associations. A prime example of an association f*ck up was the whole MMR / autism thing.

Associations are dangerous things. Those who get chest infections breathe in oxygen. Is oxygen therefore associated with chest infections?
 

Physical

Lantern Swinger
#36
so angrydoc mild aspergers whats the chances of it stopping someone from serving, have a friend whos in the exact same possition and doesn't want to apply because of it
 
#37
angrydoc said:
Don't fall into the Daily Express trap of putting too much weight behind associations. A prime example of an association f*ck up was the whole MMR / autism thing.

Associations are dangerous things. Those who get chest infections breathe in oxygen. Is oxygen therefore associated with chest infections?
That's brilliant! At last a cure for the common cold! Cutting off the victim's oxygen supply! :razz: :lol: ;)
 
#38
thingy said:
Asperger is an autistic spectrum disorder which appear to be X linked disorders and may share characteristics with genetic conditions where there is social-communication disorder, which appears to be associated with incomplete Lyon X-inactivation in X-diploidy. I was involved in research several years ago with Professor Baron-Cohen to see if KS men had Asperger. The data suggested not but there were certainly similarities and KS men who have had a diagnosis of Asperger exhibit behavioural traits that can be confused with or appear indistinguishable to, Klinefelter syndrome, especially with the less common karyotypes such as XXYY, XXXY & XXXXY.
So, what you're saying is that people with Klinefelters are more likely to have Aspergers?

That is not, if I may be pedantic, the same thing as saying that Aspergers has many of the same features as Klinefelters. Aspergers doesn't give rise to hypogonadism for one thing.

APN
 
#39
all_purple_now said:
So, what you're saying is that people with Klinefelters are more likely to have Aspergers?

That is not, if I may be pedantic, the same thing as saying that Aspergers has many of the same features as Klinefelters. Aspergers doesn't give rise to hypogonadism for one thing.


APN
I conceed the point though I should point out that contrary to popular medical misconception hypogonadism is not a universal characteristic of classic 47,XXY Klinefelters though interestingly abnormal levels of FSH & LH are common.
 

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