Joining the Navy with Aspergers Syndrome

R12_CV

Lantern Swinger
I've become very attune to people with AS since my youngest lad was diagnosed 5 years ago (now 10). It's a condition that you learn more about as you witness their day-to-day activities...every day is a school day for us and him.

AS is a very broad spectrum and where an individual has been diagnosed for whatever reason, then they are tagged, END OF!

For those that HAVEN'T been diagnosed (and tagged), esp those that are at the higher functioning end of Aspergers, they go on to create their own coping mechanisms and fit in with the rest of society... including the RN.

Look around you on board your subs & ships, you'll see them if you know what you're looking for. I know of at least one Aspi in my RNR unit and have come across several other officers (excellent ones at that)!
My colleagues traits are identical to my sons yet because he wasn't 'diagnosed', he's now serving. AND as has been said before, copes with service life perfectly. By and large he is more than accepted by the rest of us.

Question is, why can't others cope with him..?
 

Gombear

War Hero
R12_CV said:
I've become very attune to people with AS since my youngest lad was diagnosed 5 years ago (now 10). It's a condition that you learn more about as you witness their day-to-day activities...every day is a school day for us and him.

AS is a very broad spectrum and where an individual has been diagnosed for whatever reason, then they are tagged, END OF!

For those that HAVEN'T been diagnosed (and tagged), esp those that are at the higher functioning end of Aspergers, they go on to create their own coping mechanisms and fit in with the rest of society... including the RN.

Look around you on board your subs & ships, you'll see them if you know what you're looking for. I know of at least one Aspi in my RNR unit and have come across several other officers (excellent ones at that)!
My colleagues traits are identical to my sons yet because he wasn't 'diagnosed', he's now serving. AND as has been said before, copes with service life perfectly. By and large he is more than accepted by the rest of us.

Question is, why can't others cope with him..?

I totally agree with you.

What grips my sh*t, is when the shrinks come up with a “high functioning†diagnosis, give the person concerned a label and virtually say “now fcuk offâ€. As I see it, if he is near the high functioning, “normal†end of the spectrum, all he gets is stuck with the label. Gee! Thanks a lot. :roll:
 
A

angrydoc

Guest
Labels are a problem, and one which has affected several people on RR who have asked me for advice.

The blame does't purely lie with doctors though - often people will not rest until there is a diagnosis, something to explain <whatever>. It can be mental health, an ache, a rash - people don't always accept that everyone is different. If you press a doctor enough, we will come up with a stab at a diagnosis which may keep you happy but will haunt you longer term. I'm thinking of higher-functioning Aspergers kids (who, to me, are blokes - nothing more pathological than that). Many are in the forces, never diagnosed because it was never pushed. Those who have been assigned the label will never have it refuted and they will be permanently unfit to serve.

Mental health is tricky, because it's very hard to prove you don't have many psychiatric conditions.

This is a general comment by the way - I'm not accusing previous posters of having a role in their kids' conditions. I'm talking about "mild" cases only.
 
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