Joining the Navy in the 1960's

Hi,

I am a student currently writing a screenplay. It tells the story of a man named Jimmy, who is 65 in the present day but served in the Navy from 1960-1970.

So as to be correct with my details, I was just wondering if anybody could help me out.

I need to know what the process would have been for a 15 year old boy in Manchester enlisting in the Navy in 1960, and what type of training/work he would have set out to do. Also, it would be helpful to know what the uniform was like.

If anybody could help me out at all I would be hugely grateful.

Thanks so much,

Kate.
 

bollotom

War Hero
writergirl said:
Hi,

I am a student currently writing a screenplay. It tells the story of a man named Jimmy, who is 65 in the present day but served in the Navy from 1960-1970.

So as to be correct with my details, I was just wondering if anybody could help me out.

I need to know what the process would have been for a 15 year old boy in Manchester enlisting in the Navy in 1960, and what type of training/work he would have set out to do. Also, it would be helpful to know what the uniform was like.

If anybody could help me out at all I would be hugely grateful.

Thanks so much,

Kate.

Strangely enough I am from Manchester, joined the navy at 15 and a half in September 1959:)
Most, if not all, Northerners went to HMS Ganges at Shotley GAte near Ipswich, Suffolk.
There is a website dedicated to HMS Ganges.

HMS Ganges Association
 

Seaweed

RIP
Book Reviewer
Sounds rather a daunting task from the point of view of achieving the appearance of authenticity from a zero base. My experience of reading anything to do with the RN is that people who haven't worn a blue suit can NEVER get it right.
 
I cant help you with any of the details as it wasn't me era. Good luck with your screen play I hope it will be good enough for someone to turn it into TV one day.
 

Rumrat

War Hero
You attended the recruiting office twice. The first time you took your education test, and brought with you a letter of consent if under 18.
You were told on the spot if you had passed or failed.
If past you came back about three weeks later and had your medical and colour blindness/hearing test.
You were informed within days if you were passed and were given a start date within a couple of weeks. The whole process from Birmingham recruiting office to Raleigh main gate took me approx 9 weeks.
I went to Raleigh as although still only 15 I was too old for Ganges by about two weeks.
The rig was great to wear except when wearing blue fronts (sea jumper) as unless I wore a tee shirt it was like a hair-suit.
I suppose a few will remember the fact that you could tell a trainee at a fair few yards as trainees wore the sea jumper under the shirt, a trained man wore it over.
One thing I never expected when I went to Raleigh was that about forty years later I would be having a sunday meal in a castle as the guest of the then Captain. 8O
 

bollotom

War Hero
writergirl said:
(Sorry if I'm sounding really simple here, I just don't have a clue) but how often would boys return home to their families?

Term time was approx 14 weeks. Leave was three weeks long. Training consisted of Seamanship/Trade training and a hefty wack of academics. If anyone was to describe their time at Ganges/St Vincent, it would take volumes. So much was crammed into that one year. You entererd as a wet behind the ears sprog and came out a man, even though only 16 years old.
In 1959/60, boys were paid 62 and a half pence pocket money per week, the rest reamaining in credit until leaving Ganges.
Kids had to learn to laundry, iron, clean, polish, sweep, drill, box, train for the navy and sometimes at one and the same time.
Someone said if you never did it you'd never understand. That about sums it up. 8) 8)

edit fer spuling
 
All good educational stuff.

It might be useful to explain how long it was before you were granted your first night leave 'ashore'. I assume you were inspected before joining the 'liberty boat' and it was Cinderella leave (back 'on board' before midnight) as a junior.
 

Rumrat

War Hero
Naval_Gazer said:
All good educational stuff.

It might be useful to explain how long it was before you were granted your first night leave 'ashore'. I assume you were inspected before joining the 'liberty boat' and it was Cinderella leave (back 'on board' before midnight) as a junior.

I think at Raleigh it was one week new entry, and then you got to go ashore at the end of the third week part one, on a Saturday after skippers rounds. As its 45 years ago I could be out by a week or two. I dipped in as the end of part one coincided with summer leave, which was two weeks.
Money was £3.00 a week and three tobacco coupons every four weeks.
Blue liners were 8/- for the three hundred I think, but its been a long time.
 
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