Jp0901

Midshipman
Hello everyone, I’ve just recently passed my recruit test and was told that with my score the best option you can go for is a marine engineer. I just wanted to ask if there is any marine engineers here who can tell about what life is like as a marine engineer?

I understand it will be hard and I know about a few of the pros but i would rather hear it from some one who is one.
Thanks
 

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
TBH, it can be hard work, especially alongside when the ME dept have to do maintenance and repairs and the other branches have more time off (not so much the WE's). Having said that I got a lot of job satisfaction out of it as I like repairing things and getting stuff working.
 

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
Pay differs from branch to branch as a generalisation but everyone is paid 24/7.

Sometimes you dip in, others you dip out.
 
D

Deleted 493

Guest
When on deployment (example: 6months) how often will you stop at different docks?
There will be port visits, but unfortunately the glamorous image of yesteryear - port hopping from sunny, beach bedecked and bar-heavy location to location isn't quite the story. Don't forget,this is a job. You're paid for your service and paid quite well compared to your contemporaries and you do have a certain guaranteed status for many years, if you want it and you stay on message and out of trouble.

You'll join, complete Phase 1 at HMS Raleigh and Phase 2 at the Defence School of Marine Engineering at HMS Sultan in Gosport. Phase 1 is a coarse filter to strain out non hackers of discipline and military ethos, Phase 2 gets rid of those who aren't technically gifted enough to cope with the basics of engineering. Phase 1 is tough, uncompromising and requires a lot of effort and focus, Phase 2 needs you to think with the stuff you think with and still stay ahead of the curve. Don't forget also, this is 'free training'. You're getting paid to extend school with an adults wage. So switch on, open your ears, be respectful, shut your mouth. Remember, you call people 'sir' and 'Chief', and 'PO' and 'Leading Hand' because of the badge on their arm and not because you necessarily like them. As said, it's a job, and this is part of the terms and conditions. They've done what you've done, know more than you do so take heed.

You'll join your ship at the bottom of the pile so don't be surprised for it to be an bewildering whirl of confusing shit and for you to think you are a complete fuckwit and not suited to the job. I did, and I'm now in my 35th year in uniform of 40 attached to naval engineering. It's hard work, you'll be watchkeeping at all hours and you'll be expected to learn stuff quick and take over even quicker on the watchbill. Listen, learn, ask questions, get professional, be conscientious. You're being paid for it. Stuff will break, you'll be involved in fixing it, others will seemingly have better times than you. Suck it up. The whole idea is to survive. Get pissed when you want to (within permitted reasonable and allowable limits) stay clean, and take interest. Make sure you are front and centre when there's a good opportunity to be so.

Above all else, never forget you're a clanky. Everyone else are just unworthy non-coms who rely on your skill to do their jobs.

:)

levers
 

Jp0901

Midshipman
Cheers mate, I wasn’t expecting it to be all as glamorous as the adverts are anyways haha but I feel pretty confident that it’s the sort of lifestyle for me. I’m good at switching me head on and focusing and things and I’ve got the ability to learn with out ******* about that much so I think I’ll do well and get far
 

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