ITV HMS Raleigh civvy to sailor

Discussion in 'Joining Up - Royal Navy Recruiting' started by RhysJJ, May 9, 2011.

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  1. Did anyone watch the series i think its about 10 years old now? Been looking to view it online or buy the DVD, no joy yet though! Does it give a good insight as to what it could be like there?
     
  2. Yeah before Labour made it all pink and fluffy.

    Was it not called "Nozzers"?

    YouTube - NOZZERS Episode 1 Part 1.wmv

    And theres always this throbber!!!

    YouTube - Royal Navy Introduction
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2011
  3. cheers its not the series/programme i meant but not bad viewing! seems more like 30 years old!
     
  4. This is more recent:

    BBC - HMS Raleigh
     
  5. I'm convinced that the word 'nozzer' is a media made up word which has unfortunately stuck. I joined in '77 and had never heard the term until the programme - anyone remember differently?
     
  6. Guzzler

    You probably won't believe this, but the etymology is said to be as follows.

    Around 1910, at HMS Ganges, there was one particular instructor, who was in charge of the new entrants, who had a particularly large and bulbous nose. The common word in the vernacular and one which the boys would have used for a nose like that was 'Schnozz'. You still hear it used for 'nose' today.

    Lads in this instructor's class came to be known as Schnozzers, as they were 'Schnozzer's' Lads. As time went by, the initial 'Sch' began to fall off the word and eventually just the 'Nozzer' bit was left, hence the use of the word for a New Entrant ever since.

    Having said that, if you have never heard it, it suggests that it flits in and out of fashion and was perhaps becoming less widely used around the time that you joined.
     
  7. Have to admit I'm with Guzzler on this one and I joined up at Ganges so I would have thought it would have been used there.
     
  8. Have to say that I have borrowed the explanation which Rick Jolly included in JackSpeak. Having said that, elsewhere on Rum Ration:

    "Nozzers - Local slang name for a newly entered Boy at H.M.S. GANGES, the Boys' Training Establishment at Shotley, near Harwich. The word is said to be derived from 'Nosey's boys', since a notable Instructor there once was named Parker."

    http://www.navy-net.co.uk/history/41332-nozzers-documentary-5.html
     
  9. Maybe it fell out of use and Rick Jolly's book resurrected it.
     
  10. Guzzler,

    Whilst typing, Sol & Wrecks have shed some light on the subject but could I still add my humble 2d's worth?



    IIRC (hearing from others who attended there, circa 1960) that term 'Nozzer' was used purely for the New Entry Division at HMS GANGES. Other NE's elsewhere were, I believe, just as 'affectionately', known as 'Sprogs'* and more often than not; with the F word as a prefix.

    As time marched ever onward, and the boy's establishments shut down, I'd hazard a guesss that this 'Nozzer' tally was transferred to, or resurrected for, HMS RALEIGH Part One trainees.

    *Incidentally, it was only after I'd been in a couple of years or so that I first heard the term 'Sprog' applied to newly-born babies. too.


    JACKSPEAK (being like any other language, a living language**) has taken some turns and knocks over the years as well as being introduced into mainstream English, thanks to Television and aided by Cdr. Rick Jolly's 'Jactionary'

    ie Prior to the Falklands 'Yomping' had always and only meant 'eating' within the RN - Although perhaps, internally, the Booties had previously also used it to mean 'eating up the miles'. Whatever - their exploits certainly added it the National vocabulary and I've hardly ever heard it used in relation to eating since that time!



    **And a rich vein, too - Probably worthy of some serious academic study!

    Finally, when JACKSPEAK was newly hot from the presses, many of us with several years servce were just a tad bewildered that some terms (which were possibly only 'Acting Local') had been included whilst many, many more in common usage were omitted.=-( Yet once it was out print it then seemed to gain it's own authority......
     
  11. Thanks Sol and others - interesting stuff.

    BOOTWU - yes I remember discovering the 'other' term for yomping in '82 - only had one meaning for me before then. As you say, like all 'language' it's always evolving.
     
  12. The term "Nozzer" certainly wasn't in use in '83 when I joined. I agree with the idea of the meeja digging it up to suit their selves.
     

  13. Wasnt in use at Ganges in 74
     
  14. Wasnt used in 85 when the programme was made!!!
     
  15. Are the BBC HMS Raleigh programmes only 5mins each? They seem to cut out half way thru sentences but I can't seem to find any longer versions. I found them quite interesting and would like to see full versions if possible
     
  16. Todays your lucky day!

    The Royal Navy page on Facebook released this message a few minutes ago.

    BBC Special Civvy To Sailor
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2011
  17. Lol I just saw that myself. Looks like its just the small bits stuck together but am sure it'll be interesting
     
  18. witsend

    witsend War Hero Book Reviewer

    I believe the first time I heard the phrase 'nozzer' was on here by the salty seadog 'thingy'.
     
  19. ie Prior to the Falklands 'Yomping' had always and only meant 'eating' within the RN - Although perhaps, internally, the Booties had previously also used it to mean 'eating up the miles'. Whatever - their exploits certainly added it the National vocabulary and I've hardly ever heard it used in relation to eating since that time!




    Thank **** you brought that up again Bob. I typed a post on here recently using the word Yomping as in eating, but changed it in order to avoid being attack as to the meaning.
    I still think some booty told Brian Hanrahan they had been yomping up the miles and he brought out the headline "Bootnecks Yomp across Falklands.

    I was amazed to be told by a fuckin civvy that I had used the wrong word once when describing eating. I was told by the Civilian Instructor at the sea cadets that I surely meant Yoffling.
     
    Last edited: May 10, 2011

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