Iran navy in suicide attack pledge

#2
I think it is more important now for the rules of engagement in the Gulf be changed and any unidentified vessel on a direct course with no acknowledgement be sunk within three miles, I think need a few more major assetts to support our guys
 
#3
I suspect the HMG will require casualties in the forces before taking remedial action, so as to attempt not to get blamed for starting a new conflict. They will get blamed by the Iranians, of course. That's theopolitics!
 
#4
As I think someone pointed out on another forum, there seems to be two distinct factions at work here. There are the regular Iranian defence forces who seem to be causing no trouble and there are the Revolutionary Guards nutjobs who are constantly provoking incidents and dribbling on about martyrdom.
 
#6
RoofRat said:
Plastic boat versus quick squirt from a Phalanx system! Mind you it would take a bit of political Bollox I suppose.
RoofRat
How many Phalanx systems do you have and how many cheap plastic bath tubs do they have. Only one cheap plastic bath tub has to get through to make the USN look not as bright as they appeared and that of course would be a major coup for the revolutionary guard.
 
#7
I think the USN not looking clever would probably be the least of the world's worries if the revolutionary guard actually gave the USA an excuse to start a war with Iran. Bloody trigger happy yanks!
 
#8
I'm not convinced that coalition forces would be able to deal with multiple attacks from small surface craft, especially at night. One question: Would Phalanx take out anything not coming at it's own platform e.g. any small craft heading for the oil tankers?
 
#10
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/7181929.stm

An alleged threat to blow up US warships "may not have come" from Iranian speedboats involved in a recent stand-off, the BBC has learned. The voice on a Pentagon tape could instead have come from another ship in the area or a transmitter on land, senior US Navy sources told the BBC.
Iranian state-run TV has broadcast a separate video of the stand-off, in which there is no sign of threatening behaviour by the Iranian patrols, thought to belong to the Revolutionary Guards. But the four-minute clip does not appear to show the whole incident.
The New York Times noted on Wednesday that the US-released audio includes no ambient noise of the kind that might be expected if the broadcast had come from on one of the speedboats. Pentagon officials said the voice heard in the video clip is not directly traceable to the Iranian military, but could still have come from a high quality radio on one of the small boats, the paper reported.
In this sort of incident, who knows what to believe. I believe we are in serious danger of kicking the dog up the a**e while having our fingers in his mouth!
 
#12
From experience manning VHF in those delighful waters (last visit over 10 years ago) what was described was an almost daily occurance.
An exchange would start with the IRGC which would be polite enough. There would then be some other, non connected, slaphead on the VHF who would start threating to rain down death and destruction on either ship being questioned or the one doing the questioning.
Tensions were not so high and there did not appear to be so many 'hot heads' in attendance.
It seems the Yanks acted correctly, there was a perceived threat. The IRGC were doing their own thing letting the big boys know they were there. How did we used to react when Ivan sent a Warship through the dover straits? we tailed it, we tried to talk to it. we let them know we were there and they were in our patch.
Luckily common sense prevailed.
The Iranian press has now raised the stakes again. Brinkmanship, with the amount of weaponry in attendance and the stakes that are being played for, is not something that should be saluted.
Both sets of politicos will not back down and reign in the appropriate idiots.
 
#13
Any one else ever hear the "Flippino monkey" in this part of the world[/quote]

And how much they 'Like Bananas'....The other one that sticks in the mind was the regular night watch requests on CH16 to F**k your mother'.
The amount of times I would wander up to the bridge after dropping the old mans signals off during the morning and found the volume turned down by the OOW. Ah 'happy' days.
 

sgtpepperband

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#14
‘Filipino Monkey’ behind threats?

Navytimes.com said:
The threatening radio transmission heard at the end of a video showing harassing maneuvers by Iranian patrol boats in the Strait of Hormuz may have come from a locally famous heckler known among ship drivers as the “Filipino Monkey.â€

Since the Jan. 6 incident was announced to the public a day later, the U.S. Navy has said it’s unclear where the voice came from. In the videotape released by the Pentagon on Jan. 8, the screen goes black at the very end and the voice can be heard, distancing it from the scenes on the water.

“We don’t know for sure where they came from,†said Cmdr. Lydia Robertson, spokeswoman for 5th Fleet in Bahrain. “It could have been a shore station.â€

While the threat — “I am coming to you. You will explode in a few minutes†— was picked up during the incident, further jacking up the tension, there’s no proof yet of its origin. And several Navy officials have said it’s difficult to figure out who’s talking.

"Based on my experience operating in that part of the world, where there is a lot of maritime activity, trying to discern [who is speaking on the radio channel] is very hard to do,†Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Gary Roughead told Navy Times during a brief telephone interview today.

Indeed, the voice in the audio sounds different from the one belonging to an Iranian officer shown speaking to the cruiser Port Royal over a radio from a small open boat in the video released by Iranian authorities. He is shown in a radio exchange at one point asking the U.S. warship to change from the common bridge-to-bridge channel 16 to another channel, perhaps to speak to the Navy without being interrupted.

Further, there’s none of the background noise in the audio released by the U.S. that would have been picked up by a radio handset in an open boat.

So with Navy officials unsure and the Iranians accusing the U.S. of fabrications, whose voice was it? In recent years, American ships operating in the Middle East have had to contend with a mysterious but profane voice known by the ethnically insulting handle of “Filipino Monkey,†likely more than one person, who listens in on ship-to-ship radio traffic and then jumps on the net shouting insults and jabbering vile epithets.

Navy women — a helicopter pilot hailing a tanker, for example — who are overheard on the radio are said to suffer particularly degrading treatment.

Several Navy ship drivers interviewed by Navy Times are raising the possibility that the Monkey, or an imitator, was indeed featured in that video.

Rick Hoffman, a retired captain who commanded the cruiser Hue City and spent many of his 17 years at sea in the Gulf was subject to the renegade radio talker repeatedly, often without pause during the so-called “Tanker Wars†of the late 1980s.

“For 25 years there’s been this mythical guy out there who, hour after hour, shouts obscenities and threats,†he said. “He could be tied up pierside somewhere or he could be on the bridge of a merchant ship.â€

And the Monkey has stamina.

“He used to go all night long. The guy is crazy,†he said. “But who knows how many Filipino Monkeys there are? Could it have been a spurious transmission? Absolutely.â€

Furthermore, Hoffman said radio signals have a way of traveling long distances in that area. “Under certain weather conditions I could hear Bahrain from the Strait of Hormuz.â€

Cmdr. Jeff Davis, a Navy spokesman at the Pentagon, could not say if the voice belonged to the heckler.

“It’s an international circuit and we’ve said all along there were other ships and shore stations in the area,†he said.

When asked if U.S. officials considered whether the threats came from someone besides the Iranians when releasing the video and audio, Roughead said: “The reason there is audio superimposed over the video is it gives you a better idea of what is happening.â€

Similarly, Davis said the audio was part of the “totality†of the situation and helped show the “aggressive behavior.â€

Another former cruiser skipper said he thought the Monkey might be behind the audio threats when he first heard them earlier this week.

“It wouldn’t have surprised me at all,†he said. “There’s all kinds of chatter on Channel 16. Anybody with a receiver and transmitter can hear something’s going on. It was entirely plausible and consistent with the radio environment to interject themselves and make a threatening comment and think they’re being funny.â€

This former skipper also noted how quiet and clean the radio “threat†was, especially when radio calls from small boats in the chop are noisy and cluttered.

“It’s a tough environment, you’re bouncing around, moving fast, lots of wind, noise. It’s not a serene environment,†he said. “That sounded like somebody on the beach or a large ship going by.â€

He said he and others believe that the Filipino Monkey is comprised of several people, and whoever gets on Channel 16 to heckle instantly gets the monicker.

“It was just a gut feeling, something the merchants did. Guys would get bored, one guy hears it, comes back a year later and does it for himself,†he said. “I never thought it was one, rather it was part of the woodwork.â€

The former skipper noted that he warned his crew about hecklers when preparing to transit Hormuz. “I tell them they’ll hear things on there that will be insulting,†he said. “You tell your people that you’ll hear things that are strange, insulting, aggravating, but you need to maintain a professional posture.â€

A civilian mariner with experience in that region said the Filipino Monkey phenomenon is worldwide, and has been going on for years.

“They come on and say ‘Filipino Monkey’ in a strange voice. They might say it two or three times. You’re standing watch on bridge and you’re monitoring Channel 16 and all of a sudden it comes over the radio. It can happen anytime. It’s been a joke out there for yeas.â€

While it happens all over the world, it’s more likely to occur around the Strait of Hormuz because there is so much shipping traffic, he said.
[Source]
 
#16
5dits said:
Daily Telegraph

Following on from last post,

Any one else ever hear the "Flippino monkey" in this part of the world
We had what we termed the female Lord Haw Haw berating us daily at our station just outside the 50 mile limit in the Mekong Delta just before the fall of Saigon. We were there to steam in and pick up Brit embassy staff and nationals if need be, sanity prevailed in the end as the Vietcong allowed one RAF VC10 in ( all seating ripped out ) to rescue our nationals.
 
#17
HarryBosch said:
I'm not convinced that coalition forces would be able to deal with multiple attacks from small surface craft, especially at night. One question: Would Phalanx take out anything not coming at it's own platform e.g. any small craft heading for the oil tankers?
Back in 2002 a very forward thinking USMC General [Van Riper] led the enemy [Iranian] forces in a Persian Gulf war-game named Millenium Challenge:-

The Immutable Nature of War



Battle Plan Under Fire

In Millennium Challenge 2002, a $250 million war game designed to test the new technologies and concepts of transformation and network-centric warfare—in which U.S. forces are data-linked with one another as never before—Lt. Gen. Paul Van Riper, former president of the Marine Corps University, was asked to command the "enemy" forces. In the first days of that mock battle, he used unconventional methods, including a preemptive attack that featured air-, sea-, and ground-launched cruise missiles to sink 16 American ships. After the American forces decided to refloat the ships and restart the game, Van Riper stepped aside from his role, contending that the rest of the game was scripted for American victory. In this interview, Van Riper explains the peril of placing too much faith in technology at the expense of a deeper understanding of the nature of war.

[align=center]---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[/align]


His battle plan included swarming USN assets with small fast boats and time after time the USN were mauled. They were mauled so badly that the war-games were stopped and Van Riper withdrew saying that they were being scripted to ignore the real Iranian dangers.

People are now starting to take a new look at Van Riper's predictions as up until now the only people who appear to have learned anything from the $250m exercise are the Iranians :thumright:

As long as the crews of the "suicide craft" are wearing hi-vis life-jackets we can assume that they are not in suicide mode :bball:

RM
 
#18
Bergen said:
HarryBosch said:
I'm not convinced that coalition forces would be able to deal with multiple attacks from small surface craft, especially at night. One question: Would Phalanx take out anything not coming at it's own platform e.g. any small craft heading for the oil tankers?
Back in 2002 a very forward thinking USMC General [Van Riper] led the enemy [Iranian] forces in a Persian Gulf war-game named Millenium Challenge:-

The Immutable Nature of War



Battle Plan Under Fire

In Millennium Challenge 2002, a $250 million war game designed to test the new technologies and concepts of transformation and network-centric warfare—in which U.S. forces are data-linked with one another as never before—Lt. Gen. Paul Van Riper, former president of the Marine Corps University, was asked to command the "enemy" forces. In the first days of that mock battle, he used unconventional methods, including a preemptive attack that featured air-, sea-, and ground-launched cruise missiles to sink 16 American ships. After the American forces decided to refloat the ships and restart the game, Van Riper stepped aside from his role, contending that the rest of the game was scripted for American victory. In this interview, Van Riper explains the peril of placing too much faith in technology at the expense of a deeper understanding of the nature of war.

[align=center]---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------[/align]


His battle plan included swarming USN assets with small fast boats and time after time the USN were mauled. They were mauled so badly that the war-games were stopped and Van Riper withdrew saying that they were being scripted to ignore the real Iranian dangers.

People are now starting to take a new look at Van Riper's predictions as up until now the only people who appear to have learned anything from the $250m exercise are the Iranians :thumright:

As long as the crews of the "suicide craft" are wearing hi-vis life-jackets we can assume that they are not in suicide mode :bball:

RM
Don't be so sure, you never know who far the Health and Safety mafia have spread...!
 

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