Indian Boat loses scopes and part of fin in Collision

Discussion in 'Submariners' started by Nutty, Jan 11, 2008.

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  1. Posted on Barrow Forum and copied over to here.

    SubSmash

    Indian Kilo Class has fin and masts damaged while at Periscope depth. Some thing which has happened often over the years. This time no damage to pressure hull and all the crew are safe.

    Shades of Opportune et-al.

    Nutty
     
  2. For the benefit of us unknowledgeable skimmers does it not seem obvious that when one is at PD one deploys the bloody periscope! Or the radar. Or the use of hydrophones/sonar to dectect skimmers who might run you over? Or, am I being too obvious?
     
  3. Old Sparks that is what should happen and in 99.99% of cases does. It fails when you come up from deep in an emergancy and do not have to opportunity to have a listen or look.

    The Opportune was coming up from 800ft. where our descent to oblivion had been arrested after out scopes and bridge had already beeen redesigned after a ranging error on the scope.

    If you can use your Scope or raise and operated the radar you are all ready in the danger zone. If you do not get the other vessel on sonar you are blind and on offer. The news papers do not make clear what the Indian boat was doing at the time of the collision. i.e. coming up from deep or already at PD (periscope depth).

    Nutty
     
  4. On the Okanagan it was the rovers variable pitch propellers, she went full ahead on Port and full astern on Starboard, sucked the boat up.... :thumright:
     
  5. We lost most of the fin when a russian trawler (A :censored: I) ran us over, see cold war dit


    Scouse :thumright:
     
  6. Whats that shit?

    Indian ones might run blind but all the other nations keep a listening watch. Don't the Indians have a sound room.
    If you can't hear a merchantman close enough to run over you, you must be doing something wrong. Perhaps they were at prayers.
     
  7. Probably having an 'English' and throwing bread rolls at each other!
     
  8. Have you seen the name of the Reoprter?Poor bastard.


    Sandeep Dikshit
     

  9. If its coming straight at you the prop is shielded by the hull and you carnt hear it. :dontknow: espesialy if its in your stern arcs
     
  10. Just glad they`re safe :whew:
     
  11. You also tend to get run over by tankers if snorting off Portland at night when the Jimmy falls asleep on the after periscope.

    However it's no problem to fix. You just cut the fin off a decommissioned boat and weld onto the bent one easy!
     
  12. I reckon several sets of underwear needed changing though, and no doubt the CO is pondering his new career in a call centre or IT help desk.
     
  13. Not neccessarily. I remember seeing two guest CASEX submarines (Dutch, Norwegian or German) after they were involved in PD collisions with merships in the PEXAs, only a few months apart, shortly before FOST moved out of Portland. Happily, damage was restricted to the fins.

    There was also this incident reported in 2004.

    Unless I misunderstand the gist of your final remark, you should know that Indians tend to be Hindus, not Moslems. That is why there was a bit of bother which led to partition and the birth of a country called Pakistan in 1947. I understand that it was in all the papers at the time.
     
  14. To be able to operate safely at sea in any area you have to know what it is you are doing! It doesn't matter how much 'all the bells and whistles kit' the boat is fitted with. If it's not used properly you may as well not have it onboard.
    The collision may have just been 'one of those things' but usually it's because somebody was not doing the job he (Indian Navy is all male I take it) was supposed to. Or maybe because the ATBAW kit was telling them something and they ignored it or believed it and it was the wrong info!
    The RNSM service practice of always conducting themselves as if at war and ALWAYS keeping things as simple as possible in order to pick up developments before they become dangerous has stood us in good stead. BUT not all the time. Accidents will happen...usually they are caused by human error though.

    The Royal Navy in general operates by Sods Law...and it's a good 'un. If it may happen it will...so be ready for it!
     
  15. Reading in between the lines it seems it was fortunately a minor bump. Fortunately in general the Indian Navy is a bit more professional than the reporter on the Hindu who like most of the other reporters in India go for the limited facts sensational approach to journalism.
     
  16. Have you forgotten what happened to the Newport News, almost exactly a year previously?

    Oh, and if the prayers comment was aimed at their supposed raggedyheadedness as NG suggests, you obviously missed the mahooosive clue in the original link!
     
  17. .........I guess when you sundodgers get it wrong (or someone else gets it 'wrong' for you) it tends to be serious stuff. We might take the p**s out of each other but in such incidents we are all matelots and feel the pain for each other!
     
  18. Thank god we live in good old blighty and don't have to put up with that style of journalism ourselves eh? :w00t:
     
  19. I visted India regularly during the 80s and knew quite a few IN officers, both serving and retired, hence my comments on their profesionalism. As for their press, once you get past their tabloid style headlines and get to understand Indian English (it is getting quite different from our version) most of their papers were far better than many of ours in terms of both serious news and sensible comment when one got past the sensationalist front page stuff, where as with amny of ours things go down hill once you are past page 3.
     
  20. These things happen.....we know they should'nt but they do.

    Most if not all of us have suffered some near misses.

    I know I have.
     

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