Identifying service numbers

#1
Can you tell where someone joined the navy by their service number - e.g:
P/J109631 CPO GM, C/JX147366 P/O, D/MX70143 ERA, P/J34873 P/O , D/JX213676 A.B. ,
D/JX168188 , D/SSX14680, D/JX165912, D/JX150732 , D/J113542 P/O (GM), D/JX200187 W/N, D/JX191917 A/B , P/JX269766 W/M, S.A., D/JX219889 A/B, 68371 Ord., D/MX75586 ERA, S/476RAN , P/JX103624 STO , P/LX874 (R.M.), D/K61013 Ch/Sto, P/MX79478 ERA, P/X55342 SPO, D/KX129123 Sto, D/KX127090 Sto , D/KX129173 Sto, D/KX118351 Sto , PX 203 Sgt (R.M), D/JX206209 A/B, P/ 22305 MNE, P/LX 1808, D/RX115203 Sto , D/JX169958 A/B, P/KX133844 Sto, C/JX262366 Ord, C/KX107134 Sto , D/K14146 Spo, NZD 3093, D/SSX17956 A/B, D/KX98090 Sto, D/MX53079 EAR P/JX205689 Sig

Also many of the abbreviations I know but what do these mean CPO GM, W/M, S.A. RAN, MNE, SPO and EAR
Thanks
 
#2
MNE means Marine, SPO is Stoker Petty Officer, ERA is Engine Room Artificer, so EAR may be a typo, ready to be corrected on that one. The D, P and C means Devonport, Portsmouth & Chatham. I can't remember what the other parts of the official number mean, I'll get my googling head on.
 
#6
Because it was bothering me and because it might help those assisting:

P/J109631 CPO GM
C/JX147366 P/O
D/MX70143 ERA
P/J34873 P/O
D/JX213676 A.B.
D/JX168188
D/SSX14680
D/JX165912
D/JX150732
D/J113542 P/O (GM)
D/JX200187 W/N
D/JX191917 A/B
P/JX269766 W/M S.A.
D/JX219889 A/B
68371 Ord.
D/MX75586 ERA
S/476 RAN
P/JX103624 STO
P/LX874 (R.M.)
D/K61013 Ch/Sto
P/MX79478 ERA
P/X55342 SPO
D/KX129123 Sto
D/KX127090 Sto
D/KX129173 Sto
D/KX118351 Sto
PX 203 Sgt (R.M)
D/JX206209 A/B
P/ 22305 MNE
P/LX 1808
D/RX115203 Sto
D/JX169958 A/B
P/KX133844 Sto
C/JX262366 Ord
C/KX107134 Sto
D/K14146 Spo
NZD 3093
D/SSX17956 A/B
D/KX98090 Sto
D/MX53079 EAR
P/JX205689 Sig
 
#7
Thanks all, this helps quite a lot with background information - now the next question.... In those early years of the war (1938 -1942) how likely would it have been for someone to sign on under a false name?
 
#9
Thanks all, this helps quite a lot with background information - now the next question.... In those early years of the war (1938 -1942) how likely would it have been for someone to sign on under a false name?
Kipling had something to say on the matter, if I may paraphrase:

The sergeant arst no questions, but 'e winked the other eye,
'E sez to me, " 'Shun!" an' I shunted, the same as in days gone by;
For 'e saw the set o' my shoulders, an' I couldn't 'elp 'oldin' straight
When me an' the other rookies come under the barrik-gate.

I took my bath, an' I wallered - for, Gawd, I needed it so!
I smelt the smell o' the barricks, I 'eard the bugles go.
I 'eard the feet on the grave! - the feet o' the men what drill -
An' I sez to my flutterin' 'eart-strings, I sez to 'em, "Peace, be still!"

I carried my slops to the tailor; I sez to 'im, "None o' your lip!
You tight 'em over the shoulders, an' loose 'em over the 'ip,
For the set o' the tunic's 'orrid." An' 'e sez to me, "Strike me dead,
But I thought you was used to the business!" an' so 'e done what I said.

Next week I'll 'ave 'em fitted; I'll buy me a swagger-cane;
They'll let me free o' the barricks to walk on the Hoe again,
In the name o' William Parsons, that used to be Edward Clay,
An' - any pore beggar that wants it can draw my fourpence a day!

Back to the Army again, sergeant,
Back to the Army again.
Rather too free with my fancies? Wot - me?
I'm back to the Army again!

Although, he was referring to the Great War rather than the Second World War, but you imagine that it would be as common.
 
#10
Thanks all, this helps quite a lot with background information - now the next question.... In those early years of the war (1938 -1942) how likely would it have been for someone to sign on under a false name?
With everything being paper records and the amount destroyed in various city archives due to the bombing I would imagine it was relatively easy, even assuming a dead persons identity so you had a background if checks became stringent.
 
#15
With everything being paper records and the amount destroyed in various city archives due to the bombing I would imagine it was relatively easy, even assuming a dead persons identity so you had a background if checks became stringent.
This is what I thought! though we think Dad did a really weird one. It would seem he signed on under a false name, then somewhere along the way ditched the false name and reverted to his proper identity - it is proving very difficult to trace
 
#16
This is what I thought! though we think Dad did a really weird one. It would seem he signed on under a false name, then somewhere along the way ditched the false name and reverted to his proper identity - it is proving very difficult to trace
Rather begs the questions as to why he felt the necessity to use a psuedonym .Then how the RN handled it when he finally came clean.
 
#17
Rather begs the questions as to why he felt the necessity to use a psuedonym .Then how the RN handled it when he finally came clean.

Sorry Fishhead I missed this! Do not think he ever came clean to the Navy - but swapped services via US enlistment
and into the Merchant Navy where he spent the last 18 months or so of the war
 
#18
When I joined in 1963 it was easy to tell where a sailor was based by the prefix to his official number.
D for Devenport
P for Portsmouth
C for Chatham
L for Lee on the Solent.
These prefixes denoted the Welfare authority for the sailor and nothing else.

After pay went computerised sometime in the 1970s all this changed and the prefixes were done away with and a new prefix and suffix added instead. My number changed from L075*** to D075***D.
I still kept my welare authority Lee on Solent (Wafu)
Hope this helps
 

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