Identify the T boat?

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
I was on Turbs for 2 years, I was on her when they fitted the reelable TA and we had the distinctive hump on the after casing.
 

powers2

Midshipman
As previously stated the photo shows the entrance to Devonport’s No 5 basin between 7 and 8 wharves, with HMS Invincible under refit in the background in No 10 dock. The date therefore can certainly be confirmed as between 1986 and 1988.

The SSN is being guided into the basin by the tugs Mastiff (nearest the camera) and Corgi, with Frances up ahead. The submarine is HMS Trafalgar. Regards
 

Lemacque

Badgeman
I can see that from my window :)
Well, obviously not that actual scene, but the view. I've seen that pic around, there's loads of those old pics hanging out in the corridor outside our office, and there's a stack of them in our store room. I'll see if I can find this particular one and see if it has any ID on the back

Sometimes boats will come into 5 basin for defect rectification (sit in the bottom left corner in pic) or to be prepped for long term storage in 3 basin with the rest of the old boats (in smelly corner (top right corner) I think). Not always necessarily to go into the SRC dock. Torbay (the Blue tile boat right?) sat in the corner of 5 basin for a very long time.

2333.jpg
 
Last edited:

powers2

Midshipman
Good to see a picture of the SRC still intact! Having been one of the small MoD team preparing the complex for commissioning, I was located on-site during the latter stages of its construction. In between fitting it out with furniture and certain equipment items (ironically, all supplied by the Royal Air Force) and convincing dockyard/naval departmental heads that their allocated spaces were suitable for their needs, we were involved in giving guided tours to numerous visitors including MP's, Government officials, Military Chiefs, local dignitaries, Press and TV etc - a dubious pleasure at times.

During one of these visits by a group of very senior Whitehall Civil Servants, one of them was thrilled on seeing his first nuclear submarine afloat in 14 dock. Unfortunately, I had to quickly point out that the dock had been flooded-up for test purposes only and the fin of the submarine he was excited about was in fact a floating dockyard caisson! And he was an Admiralty man too!!.

Forty years on, the Complex is a shadow of its former self with the CMO block and Refuelling crane just a distant memory. A little disappointing for me having witnessed the expertise and effort that went into their creation. But then again that's progress I suppose - Hey Ho!
 

Lemacque

Badgeman
Good to see a picture of the SRC still intact! Having been one of the small MoD team preparing the complex for commissioning, I was located on-site during the latter stages of its construction. In between fitting it out with furniture and certain equipment items (ironically, all supplied by the Royal Air Force) and convincing dockyard/naval departmental heads that their allocated spaces were suitable for their needs, we were involved in giving guided tours to numerous visitors including MP's, Government officials, Military Chiefs, local dignitaries, Press and TV etc - a dubious pleasure at times.

During one of these visits by a group of very senior Whitehall Civil Servants, one of them was thrilled on seeing his first nuclear submarine afloat in 14 dock. Unfortunately, I had to quickly point out that the dock had been flooded-up for test purposes only and the fin of the submarine he was excited about was in fact a floating dockyard caisson! And he was an Admiralty man too!!.

Forty years on, the Complex is a shadow of its former self with the CMO block and Refuelling crane just a distant memory. A little disappointing for me having witnessed the expertise and effort that went into their creation. But then again that's progress I suppose - Hey Ho!
Yeah, I remember watching the removal of the SRC crane, massive undertaking. The legs stayed, but are gone now too. A lot of the cranes in the yard have gone, moved to mobile cranes mostly.
That is quite an old pic now, they did a series of aerial shots over the yard & plymouth sound for some reason.
 

powers2

Midshipman
During my occupation of the SRC's CMO building around 1980, I recall the night when the huge rail mounted dockside crane that ran along 11/12 wharves was blown over during a severe gale, crashing down on the hangar of the Leander class frigate HMS Minerva and the rear end of the the outboard Type 21 frigate HMS Ambuscade. Luckily, because of the extreme weather, duty RN personnel were taking shelter away from the affected areas so no injuries were sustained although the ships were badly damaged. The subsequent enquiry established that the crane's jib had become locked into one position instead of being able to swing free in the wind. In so doing it had acted as a giant sail. The two ships were berthed together in the position where the single Type 23 frigate is shown in your picture.

Regarding the taking of official pictures in the Yard or in Plymouth Sound, this has been going on for around a century and was always carried out by the old dockyard photographic sections or, for aerial shots, either by the HMS Seahawk photograhic section at RNAS Culdrose, or further back, RAF photographers onboard aircraft from the Cornish RAF bases at St Eval and St Mawgan. It used to be common practice for ships to be photographed from every angle whilst in pristine condition immediately after refits. This was usually achieved whilst they were secured to Charlie buoy in Plymouth Sound. Many of these old photos can be found on the internet.
 

WreckerL

War Hero
Super Moderator
During my occupation of the SRC's CMO building around 1980, I recall the night when the huge rail mounted dockside crane that ran along 11/12 wharves was blown over during a severe gale, crashing down on the hangar of the Leander class frigate HMS Minerva and the rear end of the the outboard Type 21 frigate HMS Ambuscade. Luckily, because of the extreme weather, duty RN personnel were taking shelter away from the affected areas so no injuries were sustained although the ships were badly damaged. The subsequent enquiry established that the crane's jib had become locked into one position instead of being able to swing free in the wind. In so doing it had acted as a giant sail. The two ships were berthed together in the position where the single Type 23 frigate is shown in your picture.

Regarding the taking of official pictures in the Yard or in Plymouth Sound, this has been going on for around a century and was always carried out by the old dockyard photographic sections or, for aerial shots, either by the HMS Seahawk photograhic section at RNAS Culdrose, or further back, RAF photographers onboard aircraft from the Cornish RAF bases at St Eval and St Mawgan. It used to be common practice for ships to be photographed from every angle whilst in pristine condition immediately after refits. This was usually achieved whilst they were secured to Charlie buoy in Plymouth Sound. Many of these old photos can be found on the internet.
I was duty on the boat the night of those high winds. We were on 9 wharf at the time and walking home the following day I well remember the crane lying across the two frigates.
Due to the weather we shut all hatches and the upper deck trots kept their watches on the bridge.
 

Latest Threads

Top