I used to be the CPOMA at MBOS

Ninja_Stoker

War Hero
Moderator
#3
Welcome to the site, doubtless your experience in this particular field will be invaluable to those currently serving & those trying to rejoin after a MBOS.

One of the things we find at AFCOs is that applicants who fail to reach the medical standard for entry will often quote individuals who have the same condition who are currently serving.

The difficult bit is trying to explain that the service will try to continue to employ those that develop a condition which occurs after joining as a duty of care, whereas experience shows that no two conditions are the same & the standards for entry are necessarily set high.

A good example of this parallel was a Royal Marine who lost a leg but went on to re-take the Commando Tests to prove he was still operationally capable - compared to the many potential recruits (or re-entrants) who have had ACL reconstruction & consider themselves fit to join but are gutted to hear they can't join the Royal Marines because of the stringent entry criteria.
 
#4
trelawney126 Posted: Tue Jul 21, 2009 12:08 am Post subject: Re: I used to be the CPOMA at MBOS
3yearstilltx:
I may not know all of the answers but I'll know where to find em!
Commiserations so did Mat Chapman, don't think he enjoyed the job either
He's only happy when he's a barrack stancheon (sp) at VL..... :wink:
 
#5
Ninja_Stoker said:
Welcome to the site, doubtless your experience in this particular field will be invaluable to those currently serving & those trying to rejoin after a MBOS.

One of the things we find at AFCOs is that applicants who fail to reach the medical standard for entry will often quote individuals who have the same condition who are currently serving.

The difficult bit is trying to explain that the service will try to continue to employ those that develop a condition which occurs after joining as a duty of care, whereas experience shows that no two conditions are the same & the standards for entry are necessarily set high.

A good example of this parallel was a Royal Marine who lost a leg but went on to re-take the Commando Tests to prove he was still operationally capable - compared to the many potential recruits (or re-entrants) who have had ACL reconstruction & consider themselves fit to join but are gutted to hear they can't join the Royal Marines because of the stringent entry criteria.
Hi,

I see your predicament, however all you can do, as you rightly say some people develop conditions whilst in service which may not deem them unfit to continue but in the early days deemed them unfit to complete all arms.

Not many individuals who complete all arms go on to do anything MORE arduos at any time unless like a good friend of mine they are into Iron Man events!

The other consideration of course is that once a period of time has been served any continuation in service will have less of a 'potential' impact on peer group than an individual starting out on his 22 with said condition.

The example stated involving ACL reconstruction is a clear cut decision as the arduos nature of all arms training could prove too much causing permanent disability.

This is more of an RNMEB issue than NSMBOS.

When an individual attends NSMBOS all they leave with is a recommend...
The NSMEB then endorse or change this.

All sorts of people sit around a big table in the Dockyard and discuss the individual like they are a pawn as oppose to a real person with kids mortgages ect.

Represented are drafty of each branch, naval law (pusser), the chair (Dr David Aldis), the Pres of the Med Board and various others including RM and careers.

The Med Board don't recommend a person P8 when they would like to continue too often...this occurs at MEB when they consider impact on peer group, time left to serve and roles that could be undertaken by the individual with the stated caveats.

A person can appeal twice before the file is reviewed by no other than whatever MDGN is now called!
 

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