How did my dad get home?

Discussion in 'History' started by sidcumberland, Jun 5, 2014.

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  1. Hi all. My first post ...

    I've been looking at my dad's WW2 service record (Fleet Air Arm); he worked on Swordfish radar repairs at Nairobi, Colombo and Coimbatore. His cert of service has him in one place one day, the other side of the world the next - for example, HMS Garuda 8/8/1944-24/5/1945, then HMS Daedalus 25/5/1945-6/8/1945. I can see that there would be good reasons for maintaining continuity; my question is, how do the dates relate to successive postings - e.g. in the example given, would my dad have left India on 24th May 1945, or would he have arrived in England on 25th May 1945?

    Thanks for any responses,

    Sid
     
  2. Your dad would still have belonged to HMS Garuda until the date of him joining HMS Daedalus. Though he would have been in transit while travelling he would still belong to garuda until Daedalus accepted him.
     
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  3. Thanks for that.
     
  4. all dates on service certificates run on from each other so there is no period of time when a man does not belong to a ship. As Slim said he would have belonged to his old ship (including transit time) until he joined Daedalus, so there would be no break in service on his SC. As an aside he was probably out in Colombo the same time as my old man, he was an AEM on swordfish too, small world hey. He went out to Ceylon in 44 and came back in 46 after the yanks dropped the bucket of instant sunshine
     
  5. It's just an accounting phenomena: his pay, paperwork, etc, is done by his previous ship until he joins his new one and they take over.

    The same principle applies to small ships that are too small for clerical staff, in these cases the paperwork is done by a bigger ship such as a depot ship or a shore base and the man will be listed as down as this latter unit even though he may never have set foot aboard it.
     

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